Vicky Kaushal Curated

Bollywood Film Actor .

CURATED BY :      +44 others

This profile has been added by users(CURATED) : Users who follow Vicky Kaushal have come together to curate all possible video, text and audio interview to showcase Vicky Kaushal's journey, experiences, achievements, advice, opinion in one place to inspire upcoming actors. All content is sourced via different platforms and have been given due credit.

  • Okay, tell me what’s your sort of singular memory of Raazi? What is the most joyous thing from this film that you will take away with you?

    I think for me it has to be the screen test I gave for the film. I didn’t know that Alia was going to join me for the screen test. She was very sweet to join me just to give the cues. And that was something special. That was just the beginning because right after the screen test, I was told that I was on-board and that’s a special feeling.

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  • Okay, tell me what’s your sort of singular memory of Raazi? What is the most joyous thing from this film that you will take away with you?

    I think for me it has to be the screen test I gave for the film. I didn’t know that Alia was going to join me for the screen test. She was very sweet to join me just to give the cues. And that was something special. That was just the beginning because right after the screen test, I was told that I was on-board and that’s a special feeling.

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  • What are the unique pressures of being a Hindi film actor, today? Like, what is the one thing that you really hate?

    I don’t know, I just love it too much. I mean, I treat it as a privilege to be getting opportunities to showcase your work. And also it’s such a personal process to be an actor. There are many times you are on-set and you are in a certain headspace which people around you are not aware of because you have to get into a scene or whatever. But there’s a different atmosphere going on on-set but you have to cut everything off and just be in a certain space – your own little bubble – so that you can be that honest in front of the camera when the time comes

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  • Both of you are industry kids with very different journeys. Vicky, you’ve spoken in interviews about growing up in a very small flat in Malad and the ten years it took for your father to go from being a stunt man to being an action director. How did these experiences shape you as an actor?

    First and foremost, the biggest advantage I had of having my father from the industry was that I had a reality check all the time. I wasn’t a guy who came into the industry with just candy flossed eyes. I wasn’t delusional. I knew that it takes a lot of sincerity, a lot of hard-work to expect any kind of reward. In fact when I told my father that I don’t wanna be an engineer and I want to be an actor, his first question was, “Why? Because you think I’m related to the industry and you think your path is going to be easy?” So, I had this clear picture because he always gave me that harsh reality of things as they are. It’s not a really pretty picture. You have to really work. Everybody in this industry is aiming for the moon – nothing less than that. And you have to really try and reach out to the sun to reach the moon. I feel that was the biggest advantage that I had. And he always said, “I’m always there with you as a father but not as an action director. I have my own journey, I have my own struggles. And I know nothing about acting. What you are doing, you have to be naked to do. You will get caught if you don’t know your job. The camera is brutal.” He said you know it’s going to be your own journey and I’m glad it was that way.

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  • Cate Blanchett just did an interview. She’s the jury head at the Cannes Film Festival and she did this long amazing interview in which she said our primary job as artists is to be fearless. Do you think that’s true? And what’s the biggest professional risk you’ve taken?

    I think every shot we give is a risk that we take because we are exposing our inner self, completely. We are being naked in a way. And that for me is being fearless as an actor. With emotion, many a times you have to feel it for the first time in the middle of a shot. You can’t really prep for that emotion when you leave your house knowing that this is the scene we’re gonna do today. It has to be felt when you’re doing that scene and you don’t know if you’ll be able to feel that for whatever reasons. I think that’s the risk we always take as actors and that’s something we feel nice about when we overcome it, when a shot is done. And sometimes you do get that feeling of ‘Oh wow!’ That’s what happened with me in Masaan in that breakdown scene. I didn’t know that was going to happen to me but it happened and there was a certain truth in it. I really, really felt it. And those are moments that you really cherish as an actor.

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  • know, I’m a big admirer of Aamir Khan’s creative choices. I feel he has the best gut in the business. So I asked him how he does it. And he said he has ability to look at the whole film rather that just his part in it which is what enables him to do a film like Taare Zameen Par or Rang De Basanti where he is not in every frame. Is that a hard art to cultivate? And do you think you have it, both of you?

    I try to. My entry into the industry was with a film like Masaan. It was a multi-narrative film. And I was just a part of one of those stories. My belief became stronger because for that film, people took back the story of the film and that’s how I realized that it’s very important for the story to be the hero. That’s truly what I feel. So when I’m reading the script for the first time or hearing a narration, I always at least try to have a POV of an audience, forgetting that they’ve approached me for this particular part in the story. I try to judge it by the feeling I have post reading the entire script or hearing the entire narration as an audience. “Okay, I was watching this film. What do I think of it? What do I feel about it? You know as, as a story.” I think that’s a very good approach.

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  • Alia, you’ve always been a Dharma girl. Vicky, for you, it’s the first. What it is like? Is it like being invited to the cool kids party?

    In a way it is. There are these random moments where I’m sitting in the Dharma office having a cup of coffee and the coffee mug states, ‘Dharma.’ I just take a moment. It feels good. For this film, when I got a call from Karan (Johar) saying, “Meghna’s making this film for us and she’s thinking of you for a part. She finds you suitable for that part, why don’t you come to office and meet her?” It was like slo-mo with background music going on. You feel nice, you feel grateful, you feel blessed that these kind of opportunities are coming your way.

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  • You know when I see the two of you as leads in a film, it also speaks to me of a evolution in hindi cinema. Alia, you’re this big Bollywood star. Vicky, you’re the poster boy for indie cinema. And you both are doing a movie that seems like a happy marriage of everything. How do these kind of blurring boundaries benefit you as artists?

    I think like you said it is benefitting the industry. Hats off to the makers for thinking of this pair and I truly feel blessed. I feel blessed to be a part of the industry in this phase where you know parts are being written where a Vicky Kaushal could be a choice.

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  • What are your upcoming projects?

    I've just wrapped shooting for a film called Love Per Square Foot which is directed by Anand Tiwari who is also a phenomenal actor himself. The film is produced by Ronnie Screwvala and will come out this year. The other film I'm working on is the Dutt biopic directed by Raju sir (Rajkumar Hirani) and it's like a dream going on working with him.

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  • What are your upcoming projects?

    I've just wrapped shooting for a film called Love Per Square Foot which is directed by Anand Tiwari who is also a phenomenal actor himself. The film is produced by Ronnie Screwvala and will come out this year. The other film I'm working on is the Dutt biopic directed by Raju sir (Rajkumar Hirani) and it's like a dream going on working with him.

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  • I've seen your Instagram account and you're a true Punjabi by heart. So who is your favourite Punjabi singer?

    Gurdas Mann ji. No one can go above him. There's a mysteriously positive aura around him. I had the good fortune of meeting him at his home and he has a different energy about himself. There's a different world in his words.

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  • What's that one memory in your career that stands out from the rest of them?

    It was a very small thing but I remember how happy I was when I saw this video. It was a review of Masaan. I hold Anupama ma'am (Anupama Chopra) in a very high regard as a film critic. So, in her review when she called me the 'Debut of the Year' and it meant a lot to me. It was a very small thing but it was very very special to me

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  • You went from being an AD to Richa Chadha and Nawazuddin Siddiqui (Gangs of Wasseypur) to sharing the screen with them. Was it intimidating to share the screen with someone you've assisted before?

    Not at all. I thought it would be intimidating but the credit goes to them because they are such secure actors that they made me feel extremely comfortable. I personally feel that your performance enhances when you're working with a good actor. I've been lucky to work with Richa Chadha (Masaan) and Nawaz bhai (Gangs of Wasseypur) because they always supported me during rehearsals and even in front of the camera. I was never made to feel like I was an AD on the film that they acted in and that's probably why I never felt intimidated by them. I remember on the first day of shoot for Raman Raghav, I was sitting with Nawaz bhai and rehearsing a scene when an AD came and said that the scene is ready. It was then that it hit me that I used to be that AD 5 years ago who would go up to Nawaz bhai and say that the shot is ready. That feeling didn't come to me because of Nawaz bhai, it came to me because of that AD and that's when I realized how much comfort Nawaz bhai is giving me as a co-actor.

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  • It's interesting because your father is a legendary action-director in Bollywood. And yet, the kind of movies that you've done are far from what a star-kid does in Bollywood. So, how does your father react to your film choices which are far from being big budgeted glamorous films?

    My father is really happy with my choices because he has never discriminated movies based on their budget. Of course, there's a difference between a Sultan and a Masaan but my father doesn't come from the school of thought where one is bigger than the other. I also come from an Anurag Kashyap school of films as I was an Assistant Director on Gangs of Wasseypur, so my knowledge about films came from Anurag Kashyap sir on the sets of GOW. Meeting incredible actors like Nawazuddin Siddiqui, Piyush Mishra, Richa Chadha and Manoj Bajpai who told me the importance of theater. So, I started doing theater with Manav Kaul and other theater groups where I did backstage work, I acted. Now that you remind me of, due to my experience on Gangs of Wasseypur and in theater, I've never had any expectations about having a particular kind of 'launch film' for myself. I had a 2-minute role in Luv Shuv Tey Chicken Khurana because I was a guy who just wanted to act, for however long. Thus, the thought of waiting for a more glamorous role never crossed my mind. Instead of taking the credit for myself, I'll be honest with you, I'm really lucky to have found immensely talented people like Aurag Kashyap and Neeraj Ghaywan in my life who trusted me with important roles. I was only 1-year old in the industry when I was offered Raman Raghav and that was really scary for me because it's not just an art form, there's also a mathematics attached to it. It's a commercial medium where someone invests their money. So, I'd thank these people for taking a chance on me which helped me evolve as an actor. My father has been extremely supportive of my choices. He was really happy after seeing the response I received after doing Masaan, Zubaan or Raman Raghav.

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  • What gives you the strength to struggle in a profession where there's no job security?

    The thing with pursuing a career of your own choice is that you motivate your own self and that's very empowering. As an actor, I know there'll be moments of hardship and adversities but every morning I'll be self-motivated because it was my choice to struggle in this profession. You are your own strength. There will be times when you'll see your engineer friends will be planning to buy a house and get married and at the age of 25, you're taking a rickshaw, going from audition to audition and yet nothing will seem to work out. However every morning, even in adversities, I'll be self-motivated to get better. In that sense also I feel really lucky that my family stays in Mumbai, I had a house to go to at the end of the day. I had my parents for emotional support. My father categorically warned me to not expect any calls by sitting at home. So, that motivated me to struggle on my own and be my own strength. I've been really lucky to meet the right kind of people

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  • How did your father react to your decision of becoming an actor?

    My dad asked me if I wanted to become an actor just because my father is a part of the industry. I explained to him that I'd witnessed my dad come up in life and struggle his way through the adversities. I was born in a 10x10 chawl that my father had in 1988 and I know how each and every piece of furniture has come in to the house that I currently live in. So, professional favors and glamour wasn't something that I was eyeing. Instead, I wanted to become an actor because I loved being on stage ever since I was a kid, because I didn't want to blame anyone for not pursuing what I wanted to. I didn't want to think as an old man that "I wanted to become an actor at the age of 22 but I feared failure". My father understood all of that and said that "I'm always here for you as a father but don't expect me to give you favors as an action director".

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  • So, what was that one incident that made you decide against becoming an engineer?

    We were taken on an industrial visit which is where I realized that I can't do this for the rest of my life. I can't sit in front of a computer from 9 to 5 and work like a machine. Other people may be able to do it, and I respect them for it but it's not something that I'm capable of.

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  • You may or may not know this but you're a hero to thousands of students across the country as you gave up a traditional course (engineering) to pursue your dream. Many students from the current generation face the dilemma of stable job vs passion. What advice would you give to the youth who are faced with this moral dilemma?

    Obviously, the first thing I'd say is that one should follow their heart, their gut, so that you don't have anybody else to blame in case things don't work out for you. I told my dad about becoming an actor in my second year of engineering. My dad was shocked because my grandfather had a small shop in a village, my own father has struggled through his 20s-30s and even 40s. He was at least happy that his son was doing engineering which would provide him with a salary cheque at the end of the month, where Diwali would be an off, where weekends would be spent with the family. It's the kind of life my dad always wanted for himself. So, he was very happy when I joined engineering, he had hoped for me to do my post-graduation from overseas etc. But when I told him in my second year that I love being on the stage and that I wish to be an actor for the rest of my life, he was quite shocked. But then I had a heart to heart conversation with him where I told him my perspective and he began to understand it better. So, I'd always suggest the youth to communicate with their parents whenever they have a dilemma about their careers. As students, we tend to not speak with our parents and that's where the disconnect happens. I spoke to my dad and it helped me shift careers and be happier, it would help everyone if they communicate with their parents.

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  • Before Uri, you did Sanju which was a Ranbir Kapoor film, but you still carve your own place in the audience's heart as Kamli. With the kind of expectations the audience has from a film when you are a part of a film, does that add to the pressure now?

    There is a pressure but of a good kind. That will bring the best work out of me. And I have worked very hard to get that pressure on me, because being pressured by the audience is a privilege because if there is no pressure means they don't love you care about you. I have knocked a lot of doors to get this pressure. Now that I have it, I am not letting this go.

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  • Before Uri, you did Sanju which was a Ranbir Kapoor film, but you still carve your own place in the audience's heart as Kamli. With the kind of expectations the audience has from a film when you are a part of a film, does that add to the pressure now?

    There is a pressure but of a good kind. That will bring the best work out of me. And I have worked very hard to get that pressure on me, because being pressured by the audience is a privilege because if there is no pressure means they don't love you care about you. I have knocked a lot of doors to get this pressure. Now that I have it, I am not letting this go.

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  • Vicky, your choice of films have always been very different where you don't repeat yourself. When you pick up scripts, do you have a certain template in your mind or just follow your instinct?

    I always make a conscious effort not to repeat myself in films. If I have attempted a certain kind of role or genre before, I try not to immediately follow it with the same thing. I try to take up something else in between instead. Another thing is when I read a film's script or hear a narration for the first time, I don't react as an actor. Instead, I see through the audience's perspective and think in my mind that I have paid 300 rupees for this film. So after the reading, if I feel that I should tell about this story to more people, and I get excited by the character, then I will do it or else I won't do it. The story has to work on me as an audience. After that, I focus on my character, the director and the producer. The first step is that the film's story has to touch my heart.

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  • You have been a part of both, multistarrer and solo films. How do you feel when both of them work well at the box office?

    You always feel happy when your film does well because there's a lot of team efforts involved in making it. These days, the audience is looking out for good stories. Of course, the cast may help you in achieving a certain box office number and occupancy in theatres, but the film makes its way into the audience's heart only if it has a good story. It isn't important for me whether I am playing the main hero or supporting hero. Rather I am interested in being a part of films where the script is the hero. Thankfully, I have got to work with some good scripts and directors and hope to continue to do so in the future as well.

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  • Which film do you believe was a major game-changer for you?

    My first film Masaan gave me a lot of credibility, because it was such an underdog film that nobody had any expectation from it. But when it released, people were surprised and everyone associated with the film got the credibility. Masaan opened a lot of doors for me, but with Sanju, I could reach every audience's house, I got a bigger base and spread with that film.

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  • Are you selective when it comes to choosing your films?

    But that's how I have been right from the beginning. After Masaan, I was offered a lot of roles which were based in UP or Bihar, which I tried to stay away from. Instead, I wanted for a film like Raman Raghav, where I knew, it is not for the masses, but at least I will get to show that I can do a lot more. No actor wants to get stereotyped. I always believe that the industry or audience doesn't stereotype you; it's you who do that to yourself. That choice is in your hands. I have always tried to take up different characters. I never want to repeat myself. Even now I am shooting for a horror film, so that's my agenda, that I do everything, rest is destiny.

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  • Vicky, now that you are being termed as a bankable actor in the industry, how do you plan to encash this success?

    I don't think I need to encash it. I will continue the same process of my work as I have been doing. I want to be truthful to my work and that's very important for me. But now is the time when I cannot lose focus, I cannot take this success for granted. I have to put a lot more hard work and not take things lightly. I will not take success or failure very seriously. I am in a good phase where I am getting to work with good directors and good scripts. I will never take this for granted. I will continue to focus and work hard.

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  • There is a funeral scene in the film where your character is devastated but he has to hold back his tears. What was your head-space like when you filmed that sequence which was devoid of any dialogue?

    As an actor, I get excited when I do not have the luxury of words to express my feelings, but still have to express myself. I believe, as an actor, that gives you a lot of scope to prove yourself and it's a self-test period as well. When were were shooting that scene, the first shot was that of the little girl giving the war-cry. The minute we heard her giving that cry for the first time, it pierced our hearts and gave us goosebumps. I think that energy has been reflected on what you watch on screen.

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  • What was the best compliment that you received for the film?

    For me, the claps are the biggest compliment from the audience. You hear them in theatres only when the audience feels connected to the film. We wanted to instill the feeling of patriotism in everyone and make them feel proud about the country and we have achieved that with Uri.

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  • Were you expecting the kind of response that Uri has been getting from all corners?

    We are pleasantly surprised with the kind of response the film has been getting. We were hoping to get a good response, but we never imagined that the numbers would be so good and we would hear claps, whistles and chants of 'Jai Hind' in theatres. This came as a surprise to us as well.

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  • How tough was it to get inside the skin of a corrupt cop in Raman Raghav?

    Till date, that's my toughest role. The character was so far away from me in real life that it was almost impossible to relate to it. But that was the challenge and the reason I wanted to play it.

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  • You started as an assistant director in Gangs of Wasseypur, Any plans to go behind the Camera?

    No. I was an assistant because I wanted to understand Film making. I have never been to a film school and didn't want to be lost in front of the camera.

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  • How was the experience of working with Anurag Kashyap in Manmarziyan?

    What is special about him is that he lets you interpret the character, he is never a dictator and trusts your intelligence. I always knew it would be enthralling. Not pushing is his way of pushing you for the best.

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  • There were reports that you have increased your rates, is that true?

    I need to buy food and cook also! Not that I have increased the fee but there are few films which get done in few days but some take a lot of time so I feel it should be accordingly because you put so much into it. At the end of the day, you are selling your services and you don’t have a fixed paycheck. And it is not only because of success, but there are other logistical reasons also which fluctuates it up and down.

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  • Do you think the industry has changed its take on you after Uri? How has your year been after Uri?

    It’s been a beautiful year. When you get so much love and trust from producers and filmmakers, you feel good. Your confidence boosts and you feel that you are on the right track so you just follow your gut. You must go for it if you like what you read and if it touches your heart. I never had that pressure of being solo before Uri so I had a lot of responsibility. So it made the crack and people liked it. If your film is great then it will make people watch it. My year went amazing after Uri, we got a lot of love from people and that was more special for us than the box office numbers. It is special when you get called by dialogues and you see that success reflecting in your parent’s eyes so you feel very happy about it.

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  • How much of a strategist are you as an actor?

    I don’t plan. As an artist I won’t justify my work if I am planning and sticking to it, I would feel very rigid. Being a part of good films made by good filmmakers is more important to me. People want to watch good stories, they will never complain if you are giving them 5 romantic films together back to back. But as an actor, it is fun to work in every genre and experience it. Before Uri, I hadn’t explored action so in Uri it was new for me. I don’t want one thing to become my home ground, I want to try different territories.

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  • Does emoting things in Bhoot become challenging for it to be believable?

    When you are performing a drama scene, you know whether or not that scene came out emotionally and honestly or not so I didn’t check it on the monitor that much but here it was required for me to check on the monitor if I was getting that expression of fear right or not. Because when we are shooting we don’t have that background music or the actual visual, it is just the expression. It should not be unnatural or too subtle. So I used to keep jamming with the director and talk about edit or background. I had to understand it beforehand so I was discovering it while I was shooting.

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  • Do you have any phobia?

    I was very scared of the water but now it has decreased to many levels because of the Bhoot film. I enjoyed shooting in water. But I still am not confident enough to go down to swim in middle of an ocean.

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  • For an actor, how do you get into that space of creating the atmosphere based on the scene with so many people around you?

    It requires a lot of understanding about what we are trying to create by all the teams coming together. Sometimes you are okay with moment happening around your set even while you are performing but in this film, it would bother me. There is a scene in the film in a ship where I walk in silence and one particular sound would get my attention but if something on the set would distracts me then it would destroy by concentration. So it is very important that the same atmosphere is created on the sets also. So that discipline was very important on the set where it is a narrow space. My behavior of feeling lonely should get transferred to the audience.

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  • How was it performing in this Bhoot alone?

    It was very tricky. I also as an actor, enjoy exchanging energy with co-actors which creates a scene so you keep the thrill alive. But when I was in the ship shooting haunting moments, I was wondering how would I do this with because even the ghosts would be put in later. Even on a very basic level, while we are shooting, I am supposed to react as if it is very dark and I can’t see much but while shooting it was well lit. So that in itself to act like there is darkness is very tricky. So where you had to react where there is no ghost or sound is difficult. I like to be in a flow when I am performing but I can’t do that here, I had to comply here according to what the camera and scene wants.

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  • Did you experience anything spooky on the sets while shooting for Bhoot?

    Once a ladder fell down but it did not fell completely so we felt weird about it. So we thought if there was someone on the sets who is not letting us shoot their own biopic. Nothing serious other than that. But we started the shoot every day by praying to god.

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  • With the kind of expectations the audience has from a film when you are a part of a film, does that add to the pressure now?

    There is pressure but of a good kind. That will bring the best work out of me. And I have worked very hard to get that pressure on me because being pressured by the audience is a privilege because if there is no pressure means they don't love you care about you. I have knocked a lot of doors to get this pressure. Now that I have it, I am not letting this go.

    View Source:

  • Vicky, your choice of films have always been very different where you don't repeat yourself. When you pick up scripts, do you have a certain template in your mind or just follow your instinct?

    I always make a conscious effort not to repeat myself in films. If I have attempted a certain kind of role or genre before, I try not to immediately follow it with the same thing. I try to take up something else in between instead. Another thing is when I read a film's script or hear a narration for the first time, I don't react as an actor. Instead, I see through the audience's perspective and think in my mind that I have paid 300 rupees for this film. So after the reading, if I feel that I should tell about this story to more people, and I get excited by the character, then I will do it or else I won't do it.

    View Source:

  • You have been a part of both, multistarrer and solo films. How do you feel when both of them work well at the box office?

    You always feel happy when your film does well because there's a lot of team efforts involved in making it. These days, the audience is looking out for good stories. Of course, the cast may help you in achieving a certain box office number and occupancy in theatres, but the film makes its way into the audience's heart only if it has a good story. It isn't important for me whether I am playing the main hero or supporting a hero. Rather I am interested in being a part of films where the script is the hero.

    View Source:

  • Which film do you believe was a major game-changer for you?

    My first film Masaan gave me a lot of credibilities because it was such an underdog film that nobody had any expectations from it. But when it released, people were surprised and everyone associated with the film got credibility. Masaan opened a lot of doors for me, but with Sanju, I could reach every audience's house, I got a bigger base and spread with that film.

    View Source:

  • Are you selective when it comes to choosing your films?

    That's how I have been right from the beginning. After Masaan, I was offered a lot of roles that were based in UP or Bihar, which I tried to stay away from. Instead, I wanted for a film like Raman Raghav, where I knew, it is not for the masses, but at least I will get to show that I can do a lot more. I have always tried to take up different characters. I never want to repeat myself.

    View Source:

  • Vicky, now that you are being termed as a bankable actor in the industry, how do you plan to encash this success?

    I don't think I need to encash it. I will continue the same process of my work as I have been doing. I want to be truthful to my work and that's very important for me.

    View Source:

  • There is a funeral scene in the film where your character is devastated but he has to hold back his tears. What was your head-space like when you filmed that sequence which was devoid of any dialogue?

    As an actor, I get excited when I do not have the luxury of words to express my feelings, but still have to express myself. I believe, as an actor, that gives you a lot of scope to prove yourself and it's a self-test period as well. When we were shooting that scene, the first shot was that of the little girl giving the war-cry. The minute we heard her giving that cry for the first time, it pierced our hearts and gave us goosebumps. I think that energy has been reflected on what you watch on screen.

    View Source:

  • There is a funeral scene in the film where your character is devastated but he has to hold back his tears. What was your head-space like when you filmed that sequence which was devoid of any dialogue?

    As an actor, I get excited when I do not have the luxury of words to express my feelings, but still have to express myself. I believe, as an actor, that gives you a lot of scope to prove yourself and it's a self-test period as well. When were were shooting that scene, the first shot was that of the little girl giving the war-cry. The minute we heard her giving that cry for the first time, it pierced our hearts and gave us goosebumps. I think that energy has been reflected on what you watch on screen.

    View Source:

  • What was the best compliment that you received for the Uri film?

    For me, the claps are the biggest compliment from the audience. You hear them in theatres only when the audience feels connected to the film. We wanted to instill the feeling of patriotism in everyone and make them feel proud about the country and we have achieved that with Uri.

    View Source:

  • Do you watch your own work?

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  • Which movie character would you like to be friends with?

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  • Is it easy for you to let go your characters?

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  • Have you adjusted with media and your life constantly being in everyone's eyes?

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  • What do you think, how does the paparazzi know your location?

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  • How do you protect the essence that got you here in the first place?

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  • How does success impact on an actor's craft i.e. do you become sure of your instincts?

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  • Did you at sometime became frustrated while training for 'Uri'?

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  • As you were trained by special army for 'Uri', what did you learn from that?

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  • Do you feel that sometimes your character's dialogues are controversial and you don't want to say them?

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  • What are your views on the dialogues of your movie 'Uri'?

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  • Did you learn swimming for the film 'Masaan'?

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  • Do you believe in supernatural powers and have you experienced it?

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  • As you are afraid of horror films, what convinced you to go for 'Bhoot'?

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  • Do you not like horror films?

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  • As you had and have been doing few biopics, do you think it's making a pattern and are you conscious about it?

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  • As you look like a decent guy, is hard for you to say no to people?

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  • Do you have any moments where you wake up in cold sweat?

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  • Do you feel heavy now that your responsibilities have increased because you are a star?

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  • What was your reaction after winning the National Award?

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  • Have you had time to process your success and introspect your wonderful year?

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  • Do you think after attaining success, your life has been busier?

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  • Whom are you closer to, your mother or father? And with whom you can't share much?

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  • How did you feel when Narendra Modi tweeted your dialogue 'How's the Josh'?

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  • How does feel to be a star in Bollywood now?

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  • What’s your personal style like?

    I have always been a very fashion handicapped person, as I’ve not really understood fashion much. But all I know is that I like to keep myself comfortable, because I think one’s clothes and style are an extension of one’s personality and who you are. I actually like keeping things simple, relaxed and comfortable. I’m not much into experimental stuff. Just basic clothing is my kind of fashion statement.

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  • Do you think the web platform has changed the way things used to be in the acting profession?

    The web platform has really opened up a whole new horizon for not only actors, but also for technicians, writers, directors, storytellers and producers too, because it has made entertainment very accessible to people now. They have entertainment in their pockets and what has happened is that it has also made filmmakers very cautious of what they are making. They now have to make something on par with international content, because people are more abreast of things globally now. They’re willing to pay 300 and take out three hours of their lives to come and watch a film — only if it’s worth it. Otherwise, they are happy taking out their mobile phones and watching entertainment on that. So, web platforms have done a lot of good in terms of quality of work as well.

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  • How do you manage the attention and fame that has come with your success?

    I don’t really know how I manage fame, but all I know is that I am surrounded by some very close people ­— my family and friends — who keep me grounded, and also the fact that I don’t take fame, success or failure or anything for granted. I know they are all a part of life. All I want to keep focusing on is the journey. I want to keep enjoying my process of acting ­— the rest is all subservient to that.

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  • Do you think Bollywood films are becoming more realistic?

    Bollywood is not only becoming more realistic, I think now, it’s more relatable too. People like to see stories they relate to, they like to see characters they have seen around them and flawed like we all are. They like to see how those flawed characters get into trouble and come out of a certain situation — which we can relate to and want to escape from. But they want to see that answer on the larger screen.

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  • Who is your pillar of strength?

    My father is the pillar of strength for me, because his experience in the industry is as much as my age. So, if there’s any second opinion I need or guidance I want, I look up to him — and I’ve seen him grow and struggle in this industry. So I know the harsh realities, too. I know it’s not just glitter and glamour, it’s also a lot of hard work and a lot of sincerity that this industry demands from you as a professional. That clarity was always there. Thanks to his journey, I could see things up close and personal. It helps me stay focused, and does not let me take anything for granted.

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  • How much hard work went into making Uri a success?

    A lot of hard work goes into creating a character and portraying it in the most honest way possible. In the case of Uri, especially, there was a lot of training involved. For seven to eight months at a stretch, we went through rigorous training as a team ­— actors, technicians, all of us. For me, personally, it was divided into many stages. First, it was gaining about 15 kilos of weight. There was a three-month boot camp and then training by the military personnel. I, along with 20 other actors, who played special force commandos in the film, were trained by the 7th Battalion of the Sikh regiment team in Mumbai. So, there was a lot of preparation and hard work involved, and it’s not just till we reached the film sets, but also after we reached the sets and started shooting those action sequences. Those 15-16 hours of work every day was very taxing, but very enriching and stimulating for each one of us in the team. It was a wonderful team effort and we are very glad it paid off.

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