Rihanna . Curated

singer, songwriter, actress, businesswoman

CURATED BY :  

This profile has been added by users(CURATED) : Users who follow Rihanna . have come together to curate all possible video, text and audio interview to showcase Rihanna .'s journey, experiences, achievements, advice, opinion in one place to inspire upcoming singers. All content is sourced via different platforms and have been given due credit.

  • Did you graduate from your high school?

    No, instead i decided to pursue music career

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  • Who is your tour guitarist?

    Nuno Bettencourt is from the Grammy-winning heavy metal band Extreme and is a heavy metal pro.

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  • She banned people bringing umbrellas to her gigs, why?

    After the release of her hit single ‘Umbrella’ Rihanna feared fans might bring umbrellas to gigs and hurt themselves or other people – so she banned them.

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  • She’s been in the Guinness World Book of Records six times, isn't it?

    Her records include being the first female artist to have a UK No. One five years in a row (2007-2011), Best Selling Digital Artist (US), as well as being the most-liked person on Facebook in 2014

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  • Can you wink?

    absolutely no!

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  • Did she insure her legs?

    In 2007 Rihanna insured her legs in for $1 million after winning Gillette’s Venus Breeze competition for the best legs.

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  • Did she win a school beauty pageant?

    When she was 16, Rihanna took part in her high school’s beauty pageant, singing ‘Hero’ by Mariah Carey. She went on to win the title of ‘Miss Combermere’.

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  • Is it real, In Barbados there is a Rihanna Day?

    In 2008 former Prime Minister of Barbados, David Thompson, announced that there would be an annual Rihanna Day every year on 22nd February. Although this is not a bank holiday, people come together to celebrate it every year by listening to her music. Occasionally she even returns to perform. What’s more, the street where she used to live has been renamed to ‘Rihanna Drive’.

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  • Who is your biggest influence?

    She once said that she wanted to be the “Black Madonna,” explaining that she admires the way Madonna constantly reinvents herself.

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  • Where did Rihanna got vocal training?

    Upon rapidly entering the charts, Rihanna admitted that she had never received official singing lessons. She said of her work with Ne-Yo: “I’ve never had vocal training, so when I’m in the studio, he’ll tell me how to breathe and stuff… He’ll call out these big fancy words: ‘OK, I want you to do staccato.’ And I’m like, ‘OK, I don’t know what that is.'”

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  • Who discovered Rihanna?

    After sending in her demo tapes to Def Jam Records, she was auditioned by their (then) president, Jay-Z, who signed her afterwards. Jay-Z was reportedly so impressed that he demanded Rihanna not leave the building until the contract was signed.

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  • Do you dance everyday?

    yes at 3PM

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  • Whats your favourite dish?

    A carribean style curry

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  • What about friends and family time?

    Rihanna admits she has not always been the best at making time for friends and family, often becoming overwhelmed with her demanding career. She even publicly posted about this on Instagram in November, stating “To all my friends/family/coworkers who I have yet to get back to in the past months…please forgive me. this year has been quite an overwhelming one, and I’m working on that ish called Balance. brb.” She has noted that this year she will place an emphasis on spending time with family, despite the pressures of her music career.

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  • What is your workout plan?

    Rihanna explains much of her motivation to workout is so she can eat whatever she is craving, guilt free. She told Vanity Fair “Legit, I have been in the gym every day this week because I am not willing to give up my food. But I will sacrifice an hour for the gym.” Her workouts are led by her personal trainer, Ary Nunez. To keep her workout’s interesting, Rihanna uses a mix of martial arts, dancing, and calisthenics to stay in shape. She also places a large emphasis on strengthening her abs and doing body weight exercises.

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  • What do you eat in breakfast?

    “I have egg whites and pineapple for breakfast with hot water and lemon. For lunch I have fish and potatoes. I hate vegetables but I make myself eat them. For dinner I have fish again.”

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  • How do you maintain the work-life balance?

    I’ll shut things down for two days, three days at a time. On my calendar we now have the infamous ‘P,’ which means personal days. This is a new thing.

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  • How many hours do you sleep?

    I would get around 4 hours of sleep per night, coming back home from meetings at 1 am just to wake up 4 hours later to hustle.

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  • What are your thoughts on immigration issues?

    “I know what it feels like to have the immigration come into your home in the middle of the night and drag people out. Not my mother, my mother was legal, but let's just say I know what that fight looks like. I've witnessed it. I've been in it.”

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  • What are your thoughts on racism?

    “I think police brutality is probably extremely severe in America, but racism is alive everywhere. Everywhere, It's the same [in the UK]. It's either blatant, which is becoming more and more of a norm, or it's underlying, where people don't even know they're being obvious about it. You know, it's just a subconscious layer that's embedded from their entire core.”

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  • Do you wear every piece in your Fenty collection?

    “I’m not the face of my brand, but I am the muse, and my DNA has to run all the way through it,” she tells Vogue. “I don’t want anyone to pull up my website and think, Rihanna would never wear that.”

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  • Have you ever felt that god abandoned you? Or have you questioned your faith?

    Not my faith, but I have been in a place where I felt like maybe I had disappointed god so much that we weren’t as close. Actually, that happened to me while I was making Anti. That was a really hard time, but, thank god, I got through it.

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  • Have you always been a person of real faith?

    I’ve always been. My first time praying and fasting was when I was 7 years old. I did that on my own, because I wanted to go to New York, and I knew that this was a sacrifice I had to make in order for god to make sure I could get there.

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  • What’s the first thing you do when you wake up in the morning?

    Pray. u mean first thing? Unless I have to pee or something. I always want to start my day with a little devotion. I buy these devotion books and they’re dated, so you just pull up the date and that devotion is for that day.

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  • Do you want to be a mother?

    More than anything in life.

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  • I love that you happen to be an extraordinarily famous person but can also be a person who is afraid to look someone in the eye?

    It’s true. I still get nervous going to award shows.

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  • What’s the biggest misconception about you?

    People don’t know that I’m shy

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  • It’s kind of amazing to go through life knowing that there are people out there who are just loyal to you. isn't it good?

    It’s an amazing feeling, because I started off as a kid, so I know my fans were kids, too. We’re all growing up together. It’s crazy to see where our paths are taking us, and how our journeys are evolving at the same time. I feel like they’re completely responsible for who I am, and where I am at in my career. God got me to a place, and they supported me and got me to where I am now. I feel really indebted to them.

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  • what makes a Rihanna fan different from other people’s fan bases? How did they even come up with “The Navy”?

    I think that happened from a song called “G4L,” where I say, “We’re an army, better yet, a navy, better yet, crazy.” Then Battleship kind of pushed that forward even more. But my fans are persistent, they’re loyal, they’re protective, they’re defensive, they’re fun. To be completely honest, the thing that makes my fans different from other fans is me.

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  • What was it like for your mom when you started dressing for videos?

    The only thing my mom didn’t let me do was dye my hair black and cut it short. I’d wanted to do that since I was 14 and she was like, “No, not having it.” So instead, I tried putting on burgundy extensions and I got sent home from school. They told me to either take them out or dye it dark. I left school and went to town to buy some hairspray and spray them dark brown. I was like, “I spent $70 on these extensions! I’m going to make them work.”

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  • When do you sleep, girl?

    I don’t have a sleep pattern. I have sleep pockets. I fit it in when I can. That’s why I take those personal days so seriously. Because it’s like, “You had all of me. I gave you the answers."

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  • If there are things going on in the beauty line, do you all of a sudden go, “Wait, I don’t want to leave this hanging. I want to take care of this”?

    I don’t leave things hanging. I will work all day in a meeting, leave that meeting at 1 or 2am, and then come home with a tiny group of staff and work until 5, 7am.

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  • Rihanna Speaks About Racism In London

    While speaking to British Vogue, she expounded upon her thoughts on racism and why she’s so driven to use her massive platform to shine a light on what's happening to Black people around the globe. Rih said that seeing firsthand how her Guyanese mother was subjected to discrimination while she was growing up in Barbados greatly impacted her outlook on the matter. “The Guyanese are like the Mexicans of Barbados,” she explained to British Vogue. “So I identify – and that’s why I really relate and empathise with Mexican people, or Latino people, who are discriminated against in America. I know what it feels like to have the immigration come into your home in the middle of the night and drag people out.” “Not my mother, my mother was legal,” she added, “but let’s just say I know what that fight looks like. I’ve witnessed it. I’ve been in it. I was probably, what, eight-years-old when I experienced that in the middle of the night. So I know how disheartening it is for a child – and if that was my parent that was getting dragged out of my house, I can guarantee you that my life would have been [in] shambles.” Because of her personal experiences with racism, the Fenty mogul says it is hard for her “to turn a blind eye” to many injustices that are still happening to this day. “It’s hard to pretend it’s not happening,” she expressed. “The things that I refuse to stay silent on, these are things that I genuinely believe in.”

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  • Artists seem to be going the streaming route more and more, right?

    It’s true. Streaming is a really big market for me. We’ve been doing great in the streaming market, so it’s not something I want to alienate at all. Streaming counts now. They’re treating artists the way we deserve to be treated. So it’s not blindly—it’s not invisible sales or invisible streams or invisible listens or downloads. Before it was just—it was robbing us. Before streaming, it was robbing artists. Robbing us of our sales. It’s free music. So now the free music counts. It is definitely going to make a big difference in the music industry. For a fact.

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  • You also announced the tour before dropping the album. You’re touring with Travis Scott. Creatively, why were you attracted to working with him?

    Well, when I go on tour, I like to bring people who can get the crowd excited. That’s why we got Big Sean in Europe. We also have The Weeknd. And Travis Scott. They are all really great performers. They know how to own the stage. And that’s really important before I come on. Because I want to come to a crowd that’s like [snaps fingers] in a great mood. They’re excited. They feel like they’re ready to party.

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  • It seems bold considering the state of the industry, to double down on the risk-taking.

    I always believed that when you follow your heart or your gut, when you really follow the things that feel great to you, you can never lose, because settling is the worst feeling in the world. Settling makes you feel like a sellout. It makes you feel like a liar. It doesn’t make you feel like you believe anything you’re saying or singing or performing. If you’re performing music that is not who you are or where you’re at, it is painful. It’s painful for the performer and for the audience. And I didn’t want to be caught doing what I felt like would sell or do what I’ve done before. I needed to do what I believed in.

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  • Overall, it seems like the songs are slower and slightly more introspective and personal. Did you know that that’s what you wanted to do?

    I didn’t really know what the sound of the album would be in the beginning. I knew what I wanted to feel. I didn’t quite know how I wanted to hear it, but I knew that I would know it when I felt it. And so I went through a host of songs—songs that I thought were big and songs that I thought were up-tempo and would make sense. In the end, I just gravitated toward the songs that were honest to where I’m at right now, and how I think. The things that I want to listen to. The things that I want to smoke to.

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  • How is working with Drake different from working with anyone else?

    Um, Drake. I mean, Drake has a lot to offer. He’s very intelligent, and so I trust him a lot with his direction. Doing a collaboration with him, you know it’s going to be great. Everything he does is so amazing. He’s so talented that you kind of just trust that it’ll be right. And plus, we know each other, so I know that whatever he writes is going to be honest, and it’s going to make sense to where I’m at in my life. That’s the difference. We know each other

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  • You dropped “Work” first, obviously. There’s sort of a vocal variation in that song. I think one writer called it “post-language”—that flourish on the chorus. Did that just unfold in the studio?

    Yeah. Because I felt like if I enunciated the words too perfectly, it would just not be the same attitude or the same sass. Because that’s how we speak in the Caribbean. It’s very broken and it’s, like, you can understand everything someone means without even finishing the words. This song is definitely a song that represents my culture, and so I had to put a little twist on my delivery.

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