Ranveer Allahbadia Curated

Founder of BeerBiceps Media Pvt Ltd & Co-Founde...

CURATED BY :  


  • Traditional Ethnic Wear, Or Something Contemporary?

    Traditional Ethnic Wear. They have a charm of their own.

  • Your favourite style icon from Bollywood that you would like to collaborate with, for a video?

    Akshay Kumar, and Shahid Kapoor. I really like Ranbir Kapoor's sense of style as well.

  • One historical era that you find extremely fashionable?

    The extremely fascinating Mughal era

  • Do you have a dedicated skincare routine?

    Just a very basic one, actually. I just wash my face twice a day. My skin is super oily, so I don't feel the need to moisturise. Other than that, twice a week I will use an exfoliator and an aloe vera face mask. Those are the only two hatke things I have in my skincare routine. I am very careful about the stuff that I eat, and what gets into my body, which I think is where good skincare starts.

  • What do you think of men using cosmetics?

    As long as you are comfortable using cosmetics, go for it, it's perfectly fine. There's nothing “unmanly” about them. I personally am very comfortable in my own skin, so I don't find the need to use cosmetics.

  • Walk us through a typical workday - how do you go about?

    In the morning, I have a meditation session and plan out the day ahead of me, followed by a long shower. After that, the day gets a little fast. From 11:00 AM till 8:00 PM, I am at the office, which usually is very fast-paced. At about 9:00, I get back home and work out till 10:30 PM. After that, I usually just chill out or read, till 1:00 or 2:00 AM. A large part of my work is to write, and the only way a writer gets good at his craft is by being a voracious reader.

  • What advice would you give someone who wants to pursue a career as an influencer?

    Focus on one post at a time and try to incorporate as much value as you can in that post. Secondly, post consistently.

  • What has been the best fashion advice that you've received to date?

    To get my shirts and pants tailored.

  • Who is that one historical figure that you'd love to dress up as?

    I am deeply in love with sherwanis. Assuming that Mughals wore that more often, I would say Akbar. Jodha Akbar was a great film, and I think Hrithik Roshan looked like a boss in it.

  • What is that one fashion trend that you don't understand or are unable to relate to?

    Dad shoes. I can't imagine myself wearing those bulky shoes. Not my style at all.

  • What do you prefer to wear on a date?

    I like to play things safe, so there are a few safe, staple options. A pair of blue denim jeans with a white shirt, or a black shirt, or a black t-shirt with black pants and white sneakers. If it's somewhat formal, then a burgundy or wine coloured shirt tucked inside a pair of black trousers, with a pair of good dress shoes.

  • Who is that one style icon that you always look up to? Why?

    I really look up to Tom Ford. The kind of suits he wears, and the way he carries himself. I also really like Akshay Kumar. I think Punjabis are inherently well-dressed. I love his sense of style, especially the shoes that he wears.

  • How would you define your personal style statement?

    There are two faces to my style actually. Sometimes, I dress really sharp, especially when I am going to the office or have to attend meetings and other formal events like conferences etc. Other times it's very athleisure friendly. If I am dressed in casuals, it will always be athleisure. I don't wear any other kind of casuals, mainly because I like to go straight to the gym after that date, or hanging out with my friends.

  • What are some sartorial staples that every guy should have in their closet?

    guys should also have sherwanis, and jodhpuri suits. Also, get a few tailored dress shirts, especially if you work out regularly. Working out gives your body a great frame. Tailored shirts are a great way to make your frame pop out and stand apart.

  • There's this perception that men do not need to be fashion-conscious and that men have an intrinsic style that they are born with and need to stick with. Do you agree?

    No, Not at all. I will talk about myself. I figured out my own sense of style over a period of time, by experimenting a lot. Even at this stage, I try and experiment with my style. I think by the time you are in your late 20s and early 30s, you get an idea of the things that work for you and what you enjoy as a guy. That being said, you shouldn't limit yourself to anything. Don't be the guy who only wears shirts or t-shirts or polos. Change things up a little, and try new things. That's why we have YouTube

  • What are the best ways to curb cravings?

    Don't keep junk food at home, try and identifying triggers in terms of friends. There are friends who keep ordering junk foods and sweets, so identify triggers and try to stay away from them. Back then when I wanted to be ripped for a shoot and wanted to avoid the junk, I used to fill my body with protein and a lot of water.

  • Many people hit weight loss plateau; how can one deal with it?

    The first protocol is to try and add some cardio to break weight loss plateau. If it still does not break, I feel like, a lot of cases especially the ones that I have studied, people don't end up doing cheat meals for 2-3 weeks and that's why they hit a plateau. And it is the way the body is responding to the dietary measures saying I do need excess calories once in a while. The body produces certain hormones which prevent fat burning to take place. So take a cheat day where you can have 300-400 gram of carbs that's a lot of rice, roti and then go back to your regular diet. So, ya, you should eat cheat meals.

  • Weight loss plans that promise overnight or in weeks time results, what's your take on it?

    It will help you to get views (smiles). People who follow it are the ones who are not guided properly, they might have not found the right YouTube channels. So, I would say, you do your research first. No kind of change will happen in a week. With these weight loss recommendations, there will be muscle loss and it is unhealthy.

  • There are so many slimming teas in the market; do they work? What is your take?

    I think you should focus more on the basics, as they make just 1 or 2 percent difference in the weight loss journey. The kind of solid food that you put in your body matters way more than any of these products. I personally don't recommend them and endorse them as they are a tiny part of weight loss.

  • Can you brief us about your weight loss journey? What was your diet and workout regime to lose weight?

    EXCLUSIVE: Beer Biceps fame Ranveer Allahbadia OPENS UP on his weight loss and why he recommends cheat meals In an exclusive chat with Pinkvilla, Ranveer Allahbadia, who is best known for his YouTube channel Beer Biceps, opened up on weight loss topics and dispelled some weight loss myths as well. Written By Nikita Roy 88835 reads Mumbai Updated: February 12, 2020 09:36 am weight loss,Health & Fitness,Beer Biceps,Ranveer AllahbadiaEXCLUSIVE: Beer Biceps fame Ranveer Allahbadia OPENS UP on his weight loss and why he recommends cheat meals 0 facebooktwitterShare on whatsapp Weight loss is one of the common issues that many of us face and there are ample information and videos available online. Sometimes, we end up getting misled because of so many unfiltered information on the web. Right from which diet fads to follow to slimming teas to videos promising overnight weight loss, weight watchers are super confused on what to do and what not to follow. In an exclusive tete a tete with Pinkvilla, Ranveer Allahbadia, who is best known for his YouTube channel Beer Biceps, opened up on weight loss topics including his own weight loss journey and dispelled some weight loss myths. Check out the interview right below. Can you brief us about your weight loss journey? What was your diet and workout regime to lose weight? So, initially, I did a lot of weight training. A little bit of cardio, probably every week 30 minutes of cardio, it was primarily it was weight training centric, I used to lift heavyweights. I backed it up with a lot of clean foods. I had cut off sugar, processed food. I used to eat a cheat meal twice a week. Rest of the time I was eating veggies, chicken breast and fish, back then I am vegetarian now. Back then I was eating a very clean meal.

  • Any Tips for aspiring YouTubers out there?

    Only do regional content and don’t think of doing English content in India. It will not grow in India. Also, put out a lot of videos, as people want to see a lot of content, and also focus on the thumbnails and captions.

  • What do you think are the pros and cons of the digital space?

    The pro is that you get a voice to market your own product. Basically, you get a marketing platform for your business. The con would be the intensity, like if one video is up, you need to constantly think of the next video. You don’t get breathing space and it becomes difficult to balance personal and professional life. Overall, there are way more pros than cons

  • How do you keep yourself updated in the competitive space?

    I really feel that being Indian is a blessing. It isn’t a competitive country because we have immense viewers. You just need to put things of value that will entertain or teach them something valuable and that’s how you can also be updated.

  • How have you seen the growth of the digital platform?

    I think Reliance Jio in India really changed the game for us. I remember we took a year and a half to hit 100K and the next 900K happened in the next year and a half, so Jio just changed the scenario. We became celebrities overnight.

  • How did you come up with the idea of conceptualizing each episode?

    I have a day after every 3-4 months, wherein I just sit in my room and write down my ideas in one go. I write some 80 to 200 ideas and stock it up. Later, I select the best ones out of these.

  • How do you make sure your content stands out?

    I study my comments section a lot and try getting consumer feedback and understand what the audience wants. The originality and X-factor, I can’t explain. These ideas just pop into my mind and I execute the same. I only think a video should be made for the consumer and not for you.

  • Looking back, what was the turning moment in your life?

    The turning point was when I put up my first video. It gave me the confidence to keep moving ahead and all positive things happened.

  • Tell us a bit about your journey, how you started and more.

    I began as an engineering college student who was trying to begin a fitness startup right after my studies. I didn’t want to do a regular job. We thought of a great strategy to promote it on social media handles. And the rest is history. We did it for Indians as it was India-specific fitness content – fashion, grooming, etc.

  • Describe life before and after being a YouTuber?

    Life before becoming a YouTuber was trying to figure out what I wanted to do in life. YouTube was the one thing that I was meant for. I love coming onscreen and putting my thoughts out there. I love creating videos, so life after being a YouTuber is like a dream life.

  • How does it feel to be a digital star?

    It feels good. Eventually, when numbers start growing, you start feeling the burden of responsibility. Now, I wake up very grateful that I have an audience that consumes my content. Viewers also shower their love on social media. I try to focus on the positives than the negatives. However, there are very few negatives, so it is a beautiful life.

  • What led us to start regional content, how the audience who consume regional content differ from the English speaking audience?

    All social media platforms work on algorithms. YouTube algorithm is promoting regional content; if you create videos in Hindi, your video would be recommended to a huge number of people. For every English content consumer in India, we have got about 9 or 10 Hindi content consumers. That’s one obvious reason we started regional content and secondly I don’t do this job for money, for fame or for career goals, I do this job to make a difference to the world. An average kid from the rural part of the country should also have the right to knowledge. The plan is to create BeerBiceps content in every single regional language in India. Currently we are working on the Tamil channel.

  • Looking back which was the one moment that made it all worth it?

    Lot of times young kids come to me and say that you helped when I went through depression or you helped me lose weight – all that makes it worth it because we work 7 days a week.

  • What is the weirdest brief you have gotten from a brand? How did you deal with it?

    I can tell you the biggest mistake brands make. They think influencer marketing is advertising. They want us to hold the product and sell it’ that’s not how you sell products now. That’s how you sold products in the 90’s and 2000’s when TV was reaching out to villages and not just in in 2 or 3 cities. Indian audiences all over the country have become more educated; they switch off the TV the moment they see conventional advertising methods. That’s what pisses us off as creators as well.

  • Do you work with brands often? What are the factors you take into consideration before working with a brand?

    It’s a concept of a long-term brand image so the brand image of BeerBiceps is honesty and genuinity. If I genuinely believe the brand and feel that it will help my viewers, I take up that brand. For every brand deal we take up, there is only 20-30 brands that get rejected because I think it doesn’t go with the brand image of BeerBiceps, Now, I constantly talk about hair product usage, I tell in my videos to use it in quantities that makes your hair look good but don’t spoil your hair; so I can’t promote hair product all the time.

  • How do you monetize your content? What will be your tips to other creators who have just started off?

    Initially, don’t think about monetization. Just do it for the love of it. We monetize our content through YouTube ad sales, we get our salary at the end of every month depending on the number of views we get on YouTube and secondly, the big money comes from brands. We have a team of 10 people and everyone is earning their money through the brands, through the work we do.

  • Do you have any exercise or routine before picking your topic?

    BeYouNick is my best friend from the world of YouTube and when I met him, I was going through a tough phase. He then said that, Abhi na doosro ke liye karna band kar, khud ke liye karna chalu kar! Basically it means that Start creating videos for you, start creating the kind of videos you enjoy doing. I was going through some issues and I was reading life improvement books and watching motivational documentaries. I realized that’s the kind of mental state I am in so we launched a series of mental fitness videos dealing not with mental health but mental fitness. The difference between the two is that mental health is your current state of mind and mental fitness is your ability to tackle different kinds of difficult situations and states of mind. That’s what we enjoyed and really had a lot of fun doing it. Eventually, we will dive back in fitness but right now I am just listening to my heart. There are a lot of YouTubers in India; look at it as a business. Look at running a YouTube channel, a startup; you need to understand that if this is the startup, what’s your product? Your product is your Instagram post or your YouTube videos

  • In the immense clutter, how do you make sure your content stands out?

    I believe that in India you should understand that an average Indian always wants some value out of the content.Whether that value comes out of laughs or actual value in terms of information that they are picking up from the content, Indians want value for money. So, every time I am picking up a topic, I ask myself these two questions: -Is this video adding any value to anyone’s life? -Am I personally enjoying creating this video?

  • How did it help in establishing yourself as a content creator?

    Once I started running the YouTube channel, I realized that Tanmay from AIB had lost weight with the help of my videos. He introduced me to the world of media; he said that now you should look at other things, like the clothes you wear. That’s how I developed an interest in fashion. Afterwards I realized that my life isn’t just about fitness. There are these factors like fashion, grooming, and etiquettes. I help a lot of my cousins with communication skills and social. I realized let’s take all this content and put it up online because after a point, this fitness content became a little bit saturated and I wanted a change as a creator. That’s how I switched from fitness to fashion.

  • How did you pick the niche of health and men’s grooming?

    The only reason is I started putting out fitness videos because at that time, that was all I knew. My life was all about fitness. I started off as an obese kid, lost a lot of weight. I am writing my first book on health, it will be like a fitness autobiography of how I went from being obese to running a YouTube fitness channel.

  • How did you overcome the challenges?

    Lot of people told us to take conventional career despite of us hitting 10K and 20K subscribers, still relatives would come and say, Good! Good! But do real things, Do MBA. The correct mentality of running a social media channel is enjoying the process. If you start an Instagram page, enjoy clicking pictures, if you’re running a YouTube channel, enjoy that process. Video creation is a slightly difficult job and to do it as a career, you need to put up videos on YouTube at least once a week; ideally twice or thrice a week. If you start creating YouTube videos, or any kind of content, you’ll know within the first 2 or 3 months that this career is for me or not. I realized that it was because it is photography, videography, coming on screen; anything media related is a passion of mine. A lot of times, my videos are like a creative release for me, after a point it definitely becomes addictive.

  • Before you became THE BeerBiceps, what were the challenges faced?

    The biggest challenge at that time was that YouTube wasn’t a real option. People now look at YouTube as an actual career.

  • How did it all start with you? Please take us through your journey

    As most of you know I am an engineer, didn’t enjoy my engineering college and immediately after that, I tried launching a fitness startup. I approached an investor and he recommended that if out of so many startups, you need to stand out then a great strategy would be to start a social media handles. Throughout college, I watched a lot of American YouTubers. Once we started, I came to know that YouTube pays you for running this channel so I thought they pay me and it is a lot of fun too, so why not make this my startup! We started putting up videos; I recorded basic videos on my mobile phone. I had a lot of content ideas. I believe that if you want to become a social media star, you need to have unlimited amount of content. Also, you need to learn how to use cameras, how to record sound, how to promote, how to market your own YouTube channel. It involved a bit of a learning curve. Eventually I realized that in order to run the business, I need more people; I can’t run a startup alone and got Rajas Pardeshi and Viraj Sheth on board.

  • If you have to give one piece of advice to someone who wants to make it big in life then what would it be?

  • What would you recommend to someone who wants to get into meditation?

  • Has success in Youtube changed the life of 20 years old Ranveer in terms of relationships with family, friends?

  • Is there any Youtube channel you draw inspiration from?

  • How do you deal with negativity around you?

  • What are the top 5 mistakes that today's youth do?

  • What qualities would you want to inculcate in your life from your idols?

  • What does your life after retirement look like, as you want to retire early?

  • How has spirituality and meditation helped you, and how can it help others?

  • If you could go back in time and give 20 years old Ranveer some advice, what would it be?

  • If you could go back in time and give 20 years old Ranveer some advice, what would it be?

  • Keeping your business journey in mind what top 3 mantras would you like to give?

  • Do you think you need a co-founder when you start a start-up?

  • What would be your advice for someone who wants to start a startup/

  • Who are the few people that inspire you?

  • what's your last thought before you go to bed?

  • What is your motivation for Business or Youtube that helps you keep going when things start becoming repetitive?

  • What do you think makes your Youtube channel different from other Youtube channels?

  • How did you get the idea of starting a Youtube channel?

  • How did your Youtube journey start?

  • Could you walk us through the initial journey of your career?

  • Can you give any tips for aspiring YouTubers?

    Only do regional content and don’t think of doing English content in India. It will not grow in India. Also, put out a lot of videos, as people want to see a lot of content, and also focus on the thumbnails and captions.

  • What do you think are the pros and cons of the digital space?

    The pro is that you get a voice to market your own product. Basically, you get a marketing platform for your business. The con would be the intensity, like if one video is up, you need to constantly think of the next video. You don’t get breathing space and it becomes difficult to balance personal and professional life. Overall, there are way more pros than cons.

  • How do you keep yourself updated in the competitive space?

    I really feel that being Indian is a blessing. It isn’t a competitive country because we have immense viewers. You just need to put things of value that will entertain or teach them something valuable and that’s how you can also be updated.

  • How have you seen the growth of the digital platform?

    I think Reliance Jio in India really changed the game for us. I remember we took a year and a half to hit 100K and the next 900K happened in the next year and a half, so Jio just changed the scenario. We became celebrities overnight.

  • How did you come up with the idea of conceptualizing each episode?

    I have a day after every 3-4 months, wherein I just sit in my room and write down my ideas in one go. I write some 80 to 200 ideas and stock it up. Later, I select the best ones out of these.

  • Looking back, what was the turning moment in your life?

    The turning point was when I put up my first video. It gave me the confidence to keep moving ahead and all positive things happened.

  • How do you make sure your content stands out?

    I study my comments section a lot and try getting consumer feedback and understand what the audience wants. The originality and X-factor, I can’t explain. These ideas just pop into my mind and I execute the same. I only think a video should be made for the consumer and not for you.

  • What challenges have you faced in your journey?

    The challenge at every stage has been just learning about something new, keeping the hunger alive to learn every day.

  • Tell us a bit about your journey, how you started, and more.

    I began as an engineering college student who was trying to begin a fitness startup right after my studies. I didn’t want to do a regular job. We thought of a great strategy to promote it on social media handles. And the rest is history. We did it for Indians as it was India-specific fitness content – fashion, grooming, etc.

  • Describe life before and after being a YouTuber?

    Life before becoming a YouTuber was trying to figure out what I wanted to do in life. YouTube was the one thing that I was meant for. I love coming onscreen and putting my thoughts out there. I love creating videos, so life after being a YouTuber is like a dream life.

  • How does it feel to be a digital star?

    It feels good. Eventually, when numbers start growing, you start feeling the burden of responsibility. Now, I wake up very grateful that I have an audience that consumes my content. Viewers also shower their love on social media. I try to focus on the positives than the negatives. However, there are very few negatives, so it is a beautiful life.

  • What would you go for, Traditional Ethnic wear, or something Contemporary?

    Traditional Ethnic Wear. They have a charm of their own. As much as people like to bash social media, there's no denying the fact that a large chunk of our lives is being shaped by it. What better way to really gauge this phenomenon than by the rise of influencers over platforms like YouTube and Instagram? Indeed, the world has become one small 'gram'. As a series, Influencing The 'Gram seeks to explore how social media influencers have changed the way we think of fashion over the decade, and how for most of them, even though they consider themselves to be ardent renegades, fashion and style contribute immensely to their online personas.

  • What do you recommend, Sneakers or Boots?

    Sneakers, anytime.

  • What do you recommend, Tailored Suits Or Ready-To-Wear Suits?

    I've never worn a ready-to-wear suit in my life, and I don't think I ever will.

  • One traditional Indian menswear item you believe every Indian man should have in his wardrobe, and why?

    A classic black sherwani.

  • Your favourite style icon from Bollywood that you would like to collaborate with, for a video?

    Akshay Kumar, and Shahid Kapoor. I really like Ranbir Kapoor's sense of style as well.

  • Who would that one celebrity be who can teach everyone else a lesson or two on how to pull off the Indian aesthetic elegantly, when it comes to menswear?

    Shahid Kapoor. Just stalk him on Instagram.

  • One historical era that you find extremely fashionable?

    The Mughal era.

  • Do you have a dedicated skincare routine?

    Just a very basic one, actually. I just wash my face twice a day. My skin is super oily, so I don't feel the need to moisturise. Other than that, twice a week I will use an exfoliator and an aloe vera face mask. Those are the only two hatke things I have in my skincare routine. I am very careful about the stuff that I eat, and what gets into my body, which I think is where good skincare starts.

  • What do you think of men using cosmetics?

    As long as you are comfortable using cosmetics, go for it, it's perfectly fine. There's nothing “unmanly” about them. I personally am very comfortable in my own skin, so I don't find the need to use cosmetics.

  • Walk us through a typical workday - how do you go about?

    In the morning, I have a meditation session and plan out the day ahead of me, followed by a long shower. After that, the day gets a little fast. From 11:00 AM till 8:00 PM, I am at the office, which usually is very fast-paced. At about 9:00, I get back home and work out till 10:30 PM. After that, I usually just chill out or read, till 1:00 or 2:00 AM. A large part of my work is to write, and the only way a writer gets good at his craft is by being a voracious reader.

  • What advice would you give someone who wants to pursue a career as an influencer?

    Focus on one post at a time and try to incorporate as much value as you can in that post. Secondly, post consistently.

  • What has been the best fashion advice that you've received to date?

    To get my shirts and pants tailored.

  • Who is that one historical figure that you'd love to dress up as?

    I am deeply in love with sherwanis. Assuming that Mughals wore that more often, I would say Akbar. Jodha Akbar was a great film, and I think Hrithik Roshan looked like a boss in it.

  • What is that one fashion trend that you don't understand or are unable to relate to?

    Dad shoes. I can't imagine myself wearing those bulky shoes. Not my style at all.

  • What do you prefer to wear on a date?

    I like to play things safe, so there are a few safe, staple options. A pair of blue denim jeans with a white shirt, or a black shirt, or a black t-shirt with black pants and white sneakers. If it's somewhat formal, then a burgundy or wine coloured shirt tucked inside a pair of black trousers, with a pair of good dress shoes.

  • Who is that one style icon that you always look up to? Why?

    I really look up to Tom Ford. The kind of suits he wears, and the way he carries himself. I also really like Akshay Kumar. I think Punjabis are inherently well-dressed. I love his sense of style, especially the shoes that he wears.

  • How would you define your personal style statement?

    There are two faces to my style actually. Sometimes, I dress really sharp, especially when I am going to the office or have to attend meetings and other formal events like conferences etc. Other times it's very athleisure friendly. If I am dressed in casuals, it will always be athleisure. I don't wear any other kind of casuals, mainly because I like to go straight to the gym after that date, or hanging out with my friends.

  • There's this perception that men do not need to be fashion-conscious and that men have an intrinsic style that they are born with and need to stick with. Do you agree?

    No, Not at all. I will talk about myself. I figured out my own sense of style over a period of time, by experimenting a lot. Even at this stage, I try and experiment with my style. I think by the time you are in your late 20s and early 30s, you get an idea of the things that work for you and what you enjoy as a guy. That being said, you shouldn't limit yourself to anything. Don't be the guy who only wears shirts or t-shirts or polos. Change things up a little, and try new things. That's why we have YouTube.

  • Tell us about your journey, how did you start as a content creator?

    Right after engineering college, I thought I'll start a fitness startup. Once we started our work, we thought of approaching a few investors who would back us. It was at this point someone pointed out that I should use social media to market ourselves. That's how BeerBiceps came into being. Initially, the plan was to get around 2000 subscribers on YouTube. However, once we started, I could see that this was actually a profitable business as well. So this became a new startup for me.

  • In your opinion who is the most stylish person?

  • What was the one setback that you had on Youtube?

  • What are the biggest fitness myths in India?

  • How is making content in Hindi different from that in English?

  • How is it different for a creator to create content on Youtube as opposed to Facebook?

  • How did you felt after getting your first brand deal?

  • How much does Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram help one to create content?

  • Who do you think makes more money on youtube, fashion youtuber or comedy youtuber?

  • If someone wants to create content and wants to be self-sustaining, what tips would you give to them?

  • From where do you get the ideas of making videos?

  • Did you have an inferiority complex back in the days before starting youtube?

  • How did the fitness journey start for you?

  • Both your parents being doctors, why didn't you choose that profession?

  • Your both parents being doctors, why didn't you choose that profession?

  • How did the fitness journey start for you?

  • What led you to start regional content, how the audience who consume regional content differ from the English speaking audience?

    All social media platforms work on algorithms. YouTube algorithm is promoting regional content; if you create videos in Hindi, your video would be recommended to a huge number of people.That’s one obvious reason we started regional content and secondly I don’t do this job for money, for fame or for career goals, I do this job to make a difference to the world. An average kid from the rural part of the country should also have the right to knowledge. The plan is to create BeerBiceps content in every single regional language in India. Currently we are working on the Tamil channel.

  • Do you work with brands often? What are the factors you take into consideration before working with a brand?

    It’s a concept of a long-term brand image so the brand image of BeerBiceps is honesty and genuinity. If I genuinely believe the brand and feel that it will help my viewers, I take up that brand. For every brand deal we take up, there is only 20-30 brands that get rejected because I think it doesn’t go with the brand image of BeerBiceps, Now, I constantly talk about hair product usage, I tell in my videos to use it in quantities that makes your hair look good but don’t spoil your hair; so I can’t promote hair product all the time.

  • How do you monetize your content?

    Initially, don’t think about monetization. Just do it for the love of it. We monetize our content through YouTube ad sales, we get our salary at the end of every month depending on the number of views we get on YouTube and secondly, the big money comes from brands. We have a team of 10 people and everyone is earning their money through the brands, through the work we do.

  • How did you pick the niche of health and men’s grooming? How did it help in establishing yourself as a content creator?

    The only reason is I started putting out fitness videos because at that time, that was all I knew. My life was all about fitness. I started off as an obese kid, lost a lot of weight. I am writing my first book on health, it will be like a fitness autobiography of how I went from being obese to running a YouTube fitness channel. Once I started running the YouTube channel, I realized that Tanmay from AIB had lost weight with the help of my videos. He introduced me to the world of media; he said that now you should look at other things, like the clothes you wear. That’s how I developed an interest in fashion. Afterwards I realized that my life isn’t just about fitness. There are these factors like fashion, grooming, and etiquettes. I help a lot of my cousins with communication skills and social. I realized let’s take all this content and put it up online because after a point, this fitness content became a little bit saturated and I wanted a change as a creator. That’s how I switched from fitness to fashion.Whether that value comes out of laughs or actual value in terms of information that they are picking up from the content, Indians want value for money. So, every time I am picking up a topic, I ask myself these two questions: -Is this video adding any value to anyone’s life? -Am I personally enjoying creating this video? BeYouNick is my best friend from the world of YouTube and when I met him, I was going through a tough phase. He then said that, Abhi na doosro ke liye karna band kar, khud ke liye karna chalu kar! Basically it means that Start creating videos for you, start creating the kind of videos you enjoy doing. I was going through some issues and I was reading life improvement books and watching motivational documentaries. I realized that’s the kind of mental state I am in so we launched a series of mental fitness videos dealing not with mental health but mental fitness. The difference between the two is that mental health is your current state of mind and mental fitness is your ability to tackle different kinds of difficult situations and states of mind. That’s what we enjoyed and really had a lot of fun doing it. Eventually, we will dive back in fitness but right now I am just listening to my heart. There are a lot of YouTubers in India; look at it as a business. Look at running a YouTube channel, a startup; you need to understand that if this is the startup, what’s your product? Your product is your Instagram post or your YouTube videos.

  • Before you became THE BeerBiceps, what were the challenges faced? How did you overcome them?

    The biggest challenge at that time was that YouTube wasn’t a real option. People now look at YouTube as an actual career.Lot of people told us to take conventional career despite of us hitting 10K and 20K subscribers, still relatives would come and say, Good! Good! But do real things, Do MBA. The correct mentality of running a social media channel is enjoying the process. If you start an Instagram page, enjoy clicking pictures, if you’re running a YouTube channel, enjoy that process. Video creation is a slightly difficult job and to do it as a career, you need to put up videos on YouTube at least once a week; ideally twice or thrice a week. If you start creating YouTube videos, or any kind of content, you’ll know within the first 2 or 3 months that this career is for me or not. I realized that it was because it is photography, videography, coming on screen; anything media related is a passion of mine. A lot of times, my videos are like a creative release for me, after a point it definitely becomes addictive.

  • How did it all start with you? Please take us through your journey.

    As most of you know I am an engineer, didn’t enjoy my engineering college and immediately after that, I tried launching a fitness startup. I approached an investor and he recommended that if out of so many startups, you need to stand out then a great strategy would be to start a social media handles. Throughout college, I watched a lot of American YouTubers. Once we started, I came to know that YouTube pays you for running this channel so I thought they pay me and it is a lot of fun too, so why not make this my startup! We started putting up videos; I recorded basic videos on my mobile phone. I had a lot of content ideas. I believe that if you want to become a social media star, you need to have unlimited amount of content. Also, you need to learn how to use cameras, how to record sound, how to promote, how to market your own YouTube channel. It involved a bit of a learning curve. Eventually I realized that in order to run the business, I need more people; I can’t run a startup alone and got Rajas Pardeshi and Viraj Sheth on board.

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