Prakash Jha Curated

Director, Producer, Actor

CURATED BY :  

This profile has been added by users(CURATED) : Users who follow Prakash Jha have come together to curate all possible video, text and audio interview to showcase Prakash Jha's journey, experiences, achievements, advice, opinion in one place to inspire upcoming directors. All content is sourced via different platforms and have been given due credit.

  • What were you trying to find out in politics ?

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  • How did you changed your strategy in the coming years of changing cinema?

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  • Do you still feel the same energy and enthusiasm to make films or is it just a responsibility?

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  • What is your opinion on changes occurring in the film industry?

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  • How did you realise your responsibility towards society and country?

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  • When did you realise your responsibility towards society and country?

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  • Why don't you make movies primarily for entertainment?

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  • What is the main thing that inspired you to make movies on root causes of the rural side?

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  • When you started making films with which stream of cinema did you associated yourself?

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  • Why is there always a social political thrust in your movies?

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  • What was one thing in Dharma that inspired you the most?

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  • Which one movie that changed the course of your life?

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  • What inspired you to follow arts and films?

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  • What inspired you to make your next film Pareeksha ?

    the idea of the film came from a story former Bihar DGP and educationist Abhayanand told him years ago. He has a huge contribution in educating underprivileged kids and helping them. He used to go to Naxal areas where he met kids. The parents were always on the run, but when he spoke to kids he realised they were really intelligent. He started teaching them. They got inspired and it changed the whole structure of the society of there. Few of those children even became engineers. I believe parents, at times, go on a wrong path to provide best education to their kids. This film is the story about a father who can go to any extent to provide best education to his child.

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  • Why does your film always question the society norms ?

    Questions are always raised about how things function in our society. So when I'm making films on things happening around it will obviously have a glimpse of it. It doesn't matter how much it questions or criticises the system or products of that system. For me, a film should be engaging otherwise it won't work.

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  • How do you think about a story ?

    I find things happening around me and I see stories in them. It has always been about sharing those things. I try and understand why it is happening the way it is, give it a cinematic shape and put it in front of the world.

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  • Do you think being an artist is difficult ?

    Being an artiste is not tough, getting recognised is. I believe everybody is an artiste, I'm just one of those few who have pursued it as a career and it is a difficult process. From exploring the criminal-politician nexus in Bihar to questioning the system and society i have always dealt with hard-hitting stories. I only tries to tell an engaging story, everything else is a byproduct.

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  • Do you believe it is a difficult process to make living out of art ?

    it is a difficult process for those who want to make a living out of art. It has never been easy for me to bring my films to theatres. The struggle is constant. Even after so many releases and successes it is never a cake walk. The standing I have in the industry brings a little bit of equity, but one should never think that they have become a brand and can release whatever they want to. Sometimes releasing a film can take the life out of you.

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  • Can you tell us about your film here, 'Pareeksha'?

    It's a very emotional film about the education of an underprivileged child. Father is a rickshaw puller who takes kids to a big school every day. He wants his child to get the same education. Because education is the only way to bridge the gap betwee...

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  • Do you not watch as many films at festivals anymore?

    There's a paucity of time and all that. I will only be here for a day for the screening of my film and I will be leaving tomorrow. But some wonderful films are being screened here and I am sure I will get to see them.

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  • Is the recent IFFI any different?

    In recent years I have come here, it has been like this. And I have not really gone around and seen, but I see the buzz of people who come to sessions. I just finished a session. These are people from all over the country, I hear.

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  • Could you tell us about your association with IFFI?

    I have been making films for a long time and several of my early films have come to IFFI. It has grown and it has become a big festival, probably the biggest festival in Asia.

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  • What about the biopic on Vashishtha Narayan Singh ?

    I think it is still very preliminary. The research is happening... The script and story. I know the basic story because he is from Bihar and we have often talked about him. But (it is) still preliminary. Singh was born in 1942 in Basantpur village in Bhojpur district of Bihar and received a PhD on Reproducing Kernels and Operators with a Cyclic Vector from the University of California-Berkeley in 1969.

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  • Do you find work as a producer daunting?

    Everything (acting, directing and producing) is enjoyable. If I don't enjoy something, there is no point in doing it. So, acting also is enjoyable... It is to be able to find one more form of expression which you can work on, so I really find it enjoyable. I am doing films, I did short films and I will soon be acting in another film.

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  • Are you changing gears from sociopolitical to comedy ?

    Before 'Rajneeti', 'Aarakshan' and 'Apaharan', I made 'Mungerilal Ke Haseen Sapne' (show). And if you see those darker films, there is a lot of comedy in them... Life cannot be without laughter. Sometimes it is helpless laughter or enjoyable laughter. But there is laughter. When actors like Saurabh Shukla and Arshad Warsi came on board, it became an interesting project.

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  • What do you have to say about films ?

    My films primarily deal with issues which deal with our day-to-day affairs and they have social and political connotation. But I don't really make political films... that is my subject, that is my story. There is a lot of comedy in politics.

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  • Do you think there is a dearth of political films in Bollywood ?

    No idea. But I feel there is politics in everything... There's politics in a husband-wife relationship, at homes, in the society, school, institutions and offices... There is politics everywhere. And in politics there is a lott of comedy.

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  • Do you believe a propaganda film works ?

    You can have a propaganda film. It will work if the story is working and if the story is working, then it is a valid film... why not?

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  • Do international film festivals like Cannes add something meaningful/help Indian Cinema in any way?

    I think it is a wonderful platform for all Indian filmmakers and cinema lovers. It gives a wonderful exposure. Cannes is considered to be one of the most prestigious film festivals of the world. It definitely adds to the glory of Indian cinema.

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  • Do you see representation of women in story telling, writing, directing or cinematography changing?

    Representation of women in every aspect of filmmaking like story telling, writing, directing and cinematography is abysmally low. Males dominate every aspect of filmmaking, from stories, camera to direction. Given the opportunity, girls will excel at every stage of filmmaking but they are not given the opportunity. The need of the hour is to provide opportunities to women. The producers, market and the audience does not trust women filmmakers, but this attitude has to change.

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  • Where do you think India is lacking from hollywood ?

    I believe now the Indian cinema is also making bigger films. In fact, now Indian filmmakers are also using technology to mount bigger films.

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  • Do you agree that Hollywood has varied topics and their movies are also technologically richer?

    I believe now the Indian cinema is also making bigger films. In fact, now Indian filmmakers are also using technology to mount bigger films.

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  • Do you agree that life in India for filmmakers is not easy in terms of freedom of expression and art?

    Does censorship place boundaries? It is difficult to make a socio-political film in India without offending anyone. You can’t name a party, an ideology, you can’t do anything. Somehow I negotiate and make films, despite that there are fights. We try to say what we want but we have to also keep in mind the limitations of the society. Even though it would be difficult to make films in today’s time, one has to remain undeterred by certain hiccups and focus on their work. I think the concept of censorship is not in tandem with the concept of democracy and the freedom of expression. A country that lets adults vote and elect their leaders must let its adult citizens choose the films they want to watch. Particularly in 2018, with the digital age, the concept of censorship makes no sense. It definitely places boundaries. Like I said, censorship needs to be replaced by just certification.

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  • Did you expect Lipstick Under my Burkha to create such a controversy?

    With flaming gender equality issues in India ranging from violence to dowry, we need a gender-sensitive CBFC (Central Board of Film Certification) for sure. There cannot be a government body that is sitting and trying to clamp down voices and stories of women. It cannot be allowed. It is wrong. Censorship needs to be replaced by just certification.

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  • what are your views on censorship of sociopolitical genre of movies in India?

    With flaming gender equality issues in India ranging from violence to dowry, we need a gender-sensitive CBFC (Central Board of Film Certification) for sure. There cannot be a government body that is sitting and trying to clamp down voices and stories of women. It cannot be allowed. It is wrong. Censorship needs to be replaced by just certification.

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  • Where do you see independent cinema in India in next 10 years?

    For me, independent cinema is a film with original voice and content. There are unusual stories from all parts of the country, which are coming to fore, and audiences are opening up to these films. The landscape of independent cinema in India is exciting because it’s continuing to evolve. There is definitely awareness among the audience. People are looking for new content. And, there are makers who are thinking on the same lines. Take the example of a movie like Court (2014). People at least came to know that such a movie existed. In the future, there will be more films like this. These films are made on low budget, so they recover their cost, which encourages others to join in. I see a kind of brightness around it.

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  • Where do you see cinema in India in next 10 years?

    For me, independent cinema is a film with original voice and content. There are unusual stories from all parts of the country, which are coming to fore, and audiences are opening up to these films. The landscape of independent cinema in India is exciting because it’s continuing to evolve. There is definitely awareness among the audience. People are looking for new content. And, there are makers who are thinking on the same lines. Take the example of a movie like Court (2014). People at least came to know that such a movie existed. In the future, there will be more films like this. These films are made on low budget, so they recover their cost, which encourages others to join in. I see a kind of brightness around it.

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  • What is independent cinema in India to you?

    For me, independent cinema is a film with original voice and content. There are unusual stories from all parts of the country, which are coming to fore, and audiences are opening up to these films. The landscape of independent cinema in India is exciting because it’s continuing to evolve. There is definitely awareness among the audience. People are looking for new content. And, there are makers who are thinking on the same lines. Take the example of a movie like Court (2014). People at least came to know that such a movie existed. In the future, there will be more films like this. These films are made on low budget, so they recover their cost, which encourages others to join in. I see a kind of brightness around it.

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  • How will Satsang explore religion?

    My upcoming film Satsang is based on religion. Religion has become an important aspect of social-political life. The film explores a man’s relationship with religion. I am gearing for this film, writing, setting it up. It’ll take a little more time. This is all I can share for now.

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  • Can you tell us about your upcoming film Satsang, and about other future projects

    My upcoming film Satsang is based on religion. Religion has become an important aspect of social-political life. The film explores a man’s relationship with religion. I am gearing for this film, writing, setting it up. It’ll take a little more time. This is all I can share for now.

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  • Are you also planning to experiment with genres other than politics?

    Yes. In fact I am looking at doing newer subjects. Currently I’m working on subjects that are very different. It is an education, a challenge. I am trying to perfect it, and I am learning with every film.

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  • How do you see the growth of hindi cinema industry in all these years?

    Yes, I started my journey as a documentary filmmaker and I enjoyed working on them. Making documentaries was a learning process for me after which I moved to making art films until the 1990s. Hindi cinema has definitely evolved over the years. As technology has evolved, storytellers now have more tools and methods than ever, and audiences are increasingly open to stories outside the mainstream. The only formula is good content and a well-told story. This is an excellent time for new filmmakers to experiment with small films. These small films are low on budget and now with the option of multiplexes, they can be easily released and recovered. The distribution landscape is always evolving. There are so many platforms available these days – various international film festivals. There are web platforms like Amazon and Netflix that are aggressively moving into India like they are in other parts of the world. They offer a much-needed platform for these films to reach wider audiences. This was not the scenario few years ago.

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  • How has the Hindi cinema industry grown in these years?

    Yes, I started my journey as a documentary filmmaker and I enjoyed working on them. Making documentaries was a learning process for me after which I moved to making art films until the 1990s. Hindi cinema has definitely evolved over the years. As technology has evolved, storytellers now have more tools and methods than ever, and audiences are increasingly open to stories outside the mainstream. The only formula is good content and a well-told story. This is an excellent time for new filmmakers to experiment with small films. These small films are low on budget and now with the option of multiplexes, they can be easily released and recovered. The distribution landscape is always evolving. There are so many platforms available these days – various international film festivals. There are web platforms like Amazon and Netflix that are aggressively moving into India like they are in other parts of the world. They offer a much-needed platform for these films to reach wider audiences. This was not the scenario few years ago.

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  • You have worked with some new faces while retaining your favourite, Ajay Devgn?

    Ajay fits very well into the characters I write, but yes, I do have many new faces in Rajneeti, from my cameraman to actors like Ranbir who will surprise a lot of people. I could see the potential in his earlier work but he is leagues ahead of many of the new actors, while Katrina has worked very hard and she will shock everyone with her dialogues.

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  • How critical are producers in your kind of cinema?

    Commerce is extremely important, I think my films are expensive and Rajneeti is a very expensive film — it’s got seven actors and a crowd of 7,000 people. As for production, we are always our own producers, here UTV has acquired the film from us. Even where the marketing is concerned, we work together to see that they recover their money. Rajneeti has already sold for a good price in Bihar.

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  • How important is commerce to you?

    Commerce is extremely important, I think my films are expensive and Rajneeti is a very expensive film — it’s got seven actors and a crowd of 7,000 people. As for production, we are always our own producers, here UTV has acquired the film from us. Even where the marketing is concerned, we work together to see that they recover their money. Rajneeti has already sold for a good price in Bihar.

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  • How important is research for subjects like politics?

    Critical. But if you are not connected to the social progress of the country its history or geography, then you should not being doing that subject. However, there are very few political films made in India maybe because they feel they may not be able to marry it to commerce. But we do go very, deep into research and my assistants go to great lengths to confirm the smallest details, be it legal, political, or social — it must be absolutely correct.

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  • How do you achieve the balance between art and entertainment?

    I believe that the cine fan is entertained because of the catharsis that happens at the end of the film. Real life does not give you a chance to erupt, cinema gives you that power to do that. So you balance between drama, saying what you want to and yet entertain. Rajneeti is this story of personal power and politics. It is not the story of any political party, or political leader, it is an entertaining story which gives you an insight into what politics really means. Democracy gives you the power to elect somebody and you give your life to that person. It means the rule of the majority, but in a country where the average voting percentage is never more than 42%, how can 42% decide for 100%? Democracy often becomes a tool for people to only garner votes, leaving the process restricted to just electioneering. Democracy is true representation of people, active participation of people, which is not an easy thing.

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  • What is the biggest challenge in making films on political subjects?

    My constant challenge is to weave real life with the story, to be true to the incident, the story. This is why it takes me so long to write. Rajneeti’s first draft was ready in 2004 but I was able to shoot it only in 2009. It took me five years to round off the script. The narrative has to gel, the characters have to help the incident, the drama must be right, the acts have to be right, the actions have to be made right. You have to get the mind working for the two-and-a-half hours. If the mind doesn’t move, then you have lost your audience. It is a constant battle of trying and trying with every line, every bit of music. But, of course, the most important bit is writing the script and the story. Cinema has its own language and you have to adapt to that language. If you have to tell a story to a child, or a villager or an urban audience, you have to find a language which is able to talk to them. Take the example of Gangaajal — it worked because of the constant bottling angst of the relationship between society and the police.

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  • So the five films from Damul to Rajneeti are a good reflection of the changing society and politics in Bihar?

    Every film is a creation in time. Every film is the study of a different period. Damul was about a feudal society comprising upper castes, lower castes, the untouchables — all of that has changed today. In the late ’80s and early ’90s, we adopted the open market economy and the Mandal Commission came into action — two potent acts which changed the whole society — which were reflected in my film Mrityudand. Eight years later, when I made Gangaajal, the whole situation of the saturation of Mandalistaion was the norm and one Yadav would kill another Yadav, it was a different world. Each film is a progress of the society as it moves. Apaharan, reflected the nexus of crime and politics, the Bahubali society as it was and that too is changing. Society is coming a full circle. The last election saw a record number of Bahubalis losing the elections. There has also been a decline in the regionalisation of of politics. Today, we are going for a larger consensus and larger parties.

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  • You see a change from Lalu’s Bihar to Nitish Kumar’s?

    One, it is very difficult to say this is Lalu’s Bihar and this is Nitish’s Bihar and it is also not the right way to put it like that. Some systems are coming into place and the quality of life is improving but a lot still needs to be done. The biggest challenge facing Bihar is to create an atmosphere of industry, which means the attitude of people, government and of investors towards creating the same. Patience is key here, as Bihar has a history of being mistreated, misrepresented and neglected as far as national progress is concerned. We were neglected during the Mughal period, the British era and also by Independent India. The Mughal treated it like a suba, where they sent people to collect their taxes. The British developed Bengal and Awadh (which was already developed) but ignored Bihar. And post-Independence, there was no public investment happening in Bihar, there were hardly any public sector units (PSUs). The Green Revolution, which hit the entire country hardly touched Bihar. It is only now that the people of Bihar are realising the potential of their own state and working towards it, otherwise Bihar is only famous for exporting labour. It did so during the British time, when the Biharis went to every sugar-producing country right from Jamaica to Mauritius. For Bihar to come up in the production zone, we definitely need to give the state a special status. It has the capability with its non-polluted farm lands, high water tables all best suited for organic farming. I think Bihar will rise one day as India has risen, it’s a fact about which I have absolutely no doubt.

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  • How do you see the changes in the Bihar of Damul to the Bihar of Nitish Kumar?

    Definitely, there is a sense of security, a sense of prosperity, of change today. The people there breathe an easier air. There is some kind of system which is in place now. There is also a lot more public investment which has come in. This needs to continue for some time to reflect in terms of economy and economic welfare of the state. An empowerment in teachers, in terms of government, the regularisation of civic elections, bodies like panchayats and nagar palikas and the way they have been conducted is commendable. But whatever investments are being put into creating infrastructure, roads, and power all need to pay back.

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  • Why did you see the need to enter the political system?

    My take on politics and engagement, involvement, intervention —whatever you may call it— was for a very definite purpose. I have never been an active member of any political party. I took the LJP (Lok Jan Shakti) ticket only for contesting the elections. Political ideologies and parties have never been my forte. My idea of politics is economic development, creating processes of wealth generation, bringing in investment and creating an infrastructure in the district in agricultural because that is what my home district (West Champaran) is famous for. Contesting parliamentary elections was singularly for being in a position where I would have access to resources and help my constituency, which I have been doing otherwise as well. But cinema is what I know and cinema is what I do.

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  • Does the director in you interfere with your acting process?

    As an actor I do discuss things with my director. I follow my director's vision. But I never interfere. Even if I am behind the camera, writing a script or shooting in front of thousands of people, it has always been enjoyable. It has been exhilarating and extremely enriching, learning process.

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  • Are you happy with the different kind of roles being offered?

    I was really surprised they thought of me as I am nothing like Valmiki but he was quite convinced. I thought it would be a great learning experience, trying to find that character so it was fun.

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  • Do you enjoy being in front of the camera ?

    I am not professionally an actor but there are people who now do think of me and there are roles offered to me. I am looking it as a new form of expression that I would like to bring into my life. I really want to do characters which I enjoy. That is the criteria.

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  • What do you have to say about the police-politician relationship?

    The politician was not as blatant. Many in police have also compromised their position. My films are always realistic and here I feel an honest police officer still has enough space within the confines of law. Abha Mathur is not Singham. She is a firm police officer who knows how to get the work done but in the process I have not denuded Abha Mathur of her femininity.

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  • What do you have to say about the cases being filed during the release of film ?

    Even if we think about reservation, we are stoned. Aarakashan was banned in Uttar Pradesh and Punjab before release. Ramdas Athwale’s supporters threw stones at my office. But after the release, these politicians sent me bouquets. But by then the damage had been done. The MLA is doing it for publicity. He is doing it because nobody will ask him about Bankipore after the film’s release.

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  • What do you think about the freedom of expression in our country ?

    In this country except for journalists nobody has freedom of expression. You can still print what you believe in. We can’t even when we know the truth. We can’t say that this person belongs to the BJP and that person is from the Congress. We can’t show their flags. We can’t discuss a community. We can’t show the colour of an ideology. We face it day in and day out.

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  • Crowds form a major part of all your films. Do you manage it single handedly?

    No, no, if I give that impression then the credit goes to the leaders of the crowd association who communicate clearly with their groups and facilitate me to shoot difficult scenes on time. But yes, I enjoy shooting the crowd scenes…

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  • Why did you choose Priyanka Chopra for Gangajal sequel instead of Ajay Devgan ?

    The script was written with a female protagonist - Abha Mathur who is the first female SP of Bankipur district, Bihar and who fights against the local MLA. Priyanka fits the part and sometimes roles become an actor’s destiny. We had started training Priyanka while she was shooting Bajirao Mastani and the plan was to roll as soon as she wrapped up but then Quantico happened and everything was put on hold. Sometimes, circumstances are beyond your control because destiny wants it that way.

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  • You gave a change of image to stars like Saif Ali Khan, Katrina Kaif and Deepika Padukone, was there resistance initially?

    It is difficult to imagine Saif Ali Khan in the role I cast him in Arakshan, the same with Katrina Kaif, she was surprised I wanted her for Rajneeti. Deepika was the right choice as Amitabh Bachchan’s daughter in Satyagraha and she was ready for the change.

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  • How was your experience working with Shabana Azami in Mirtyudand?

    Shooting Mrityudand with Om Puri, Shabanaji, Madhuri and Shilpa Shirodkar was a sublime experience. We were camped in Wahi and the atmosphere at work was so stimulating. Shabanaji is a director’s delight; she works hard on her character and has a fund of questions for her directors. She kept me on my toes. It is nice to be challenged by your actors.

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  • Why do you only make political films, are you not attracted to other genres?

    My production house has made other genre of films too but politics is my calling. Growing up in Bihar, politics is part of life, which is why for me politics and cinema is the same thing. I read something in the newspapers; it bothers me so I translate my anguish into a film with human drama. A leader communicates from a platform, I express from the big screen.

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  • Have you always been adventurous and unpredictable?

    My family says that. I joined Delhi University to study Physics and ran away from there to Mumbai and enrolled myself in the JJ School of Arts. While I was there I decided I wanted to make movies and started shooting documentaries.

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  • Do you attend bollywood parties?

    Ha ha, nobody invites me to parties because everyone thinks I’m boring and if by mistake somebody does, the party halts as soon as I arrive. My music director Salim Merchant is giving me a make-over though, he is training me to become a seasonal party animal.

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  • is it that simple to be detached after making a film?

    I can’t speak for others but I like to move on. If I continue to be with this one how will I make my next film? In my head I’m already planning the next one.

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  • Are you thoroughly satisfied with every film?

    Satisfied I am, if I wasn’t I would be struggling at the post production. What is more important is that the audience should feel satisfied. As a filmmaker I can do my best, after that the film is determined by the audience.

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  • Are you usually so relaxed before a release ?

    I don’t know, but I do not feel tense. I feel happy, my heart keeps singing.

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  • Is it true that you had first offered this film to Akshay Kumar but he refused for he felt it had too much violence?

    No truth to it. We had discussed Gangaajal with Devgn while making Dil Kya Kare which was produced Ajay father Veeru Devgan.

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  • What did you make of Mukesh Tiwari as the role of Bachha yadav in Gangajal?

    Like I said, each character had a different arc. Tiwari's character had a tremendous arc, as he turned positive from negative. He is a simple man who did a fine job.

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  • What are your thoughts on police being presented as cliched manner in indian cinema ?

    You are right. I don’t think I can add anything to it. The film showed the reality. Police is corrupt, but its corruption is self-explanatory. I have always made such films. I had made Mrityudand earlier. I take care that my stories don’t get fantastical. It is circumstances that make people behave the way they do.

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  • In terms of your career, how do you look at the film today?

    My experiments [with commercial cinema] started with Mrityudand. I made arthouse films like Damul and Parinati. I make realistic cinema, but I had to adapt it to translate such subjects into commercial cinema. So, I had to learn a whole new language . After Mrityudand, this journey has continued with films like Apaharan , Raajneeti , Aarakshan, Chakravyuh and Satyagraha . I have held on to that grammar. Purists reckon I have sold out to commercial cinema. The commercial audience would say I only make 'art' films. The way I see it, I continue to hold a conversation with the public through my films. A film that doesn’t connect with the audience, that cinema is non-existent. My cinema must continuously have a dialogue with the people.

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  • Do you think Gangaajal gave a new turn to Ajay Devgn's career?

    Well, Ajay Devgn was already a star. He had done Zakhm (1998) before. That film gave me confidence in him. His intensity struck me. New turn, I can’t comment on that. Devgn today has done a Singham (2011) too. He never did another Gangaajal though.

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  • Can you recall one or two fond memories of shooting the film Gangaajal ?

    The film will remain fresh even after 150 years because it deals with the reality of society’s relationship with the police. I don’t think this will change. Things are pretty organized in my films. I enjoyed making that film. One scene that comes to mind is of Mangani Ram when he stops a bus for checking, wanting to collect money , without realizing that SP Amit Kumar is on that bus. Mangani Ram is misusing his position. He gets suspended and thereafter runs a tea stall and how he eventually redeems himself. Each character had that arc in the film. A police constable has no respect in this country.

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  • Why was it important then to have the ‘Bhagalpur blindings’-like violence as a subplot?

    It took me eight years to finish writing the script. The blindings were not the reason for me to make the film. The reason to make the film was how society cooperated, collaborated with the police. When these officers were charged by the law, people came out on the streets to support them. That is when I started writing this script. I wondered what is this relationship between the police and society.

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  • Traditional Hindus have believed that Gangaajal washes away one’s sins, but the Gangaajal in your film wasn’t so forgiving?

    That was a dark synonym used by the people who used acid [from car batteries] to cleanse society of [criminal] elements who had disturbed the peace. They felt the system was not helping them. The police used to arrest these criminals and they would get away on bail. This was like mocking the system. Apparently, the first such incident didn’t happen in a police station but in a village close to Bhagalpur. Villagers there accidentally blinded some robbers whom they had caught. That scared the people so much that robberies stopped in that village. The police took the cue from there and it slowly caught on.

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  • How do difficult do you think making cinema in today's condition?

    Cinema is a process and a part of our social thoughts. Just like books, poetry, songs and speeches, cinema also holds the power to change a few things. The process must go on, whether a cinema makes a difference or not is another thing... At least, it keeps the cauldron boiling which is necessary.

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  • What about setting a film against a realistic backdrop often leads to controversies ?

    It is difficult to make a film without offending anyone. You can't name a party, an ideology, you can't do anything. Somehow I negotiate and make films, despite that there are fights. We try to say what we want but we have to also keep in mind the limitations of the society.

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  • Do you always make films that is rooted deep in reality ?

    I primarily make a film to entertain and I try to engage the audience with a compelling story. If the backdrop is realistic, it's fun. I find stories rooted in reality exciting.

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  • Which is your next film and what. is it about ?

    I am making a film titled 'Satsang'. It is about religion... I am gearing for it, writing, setting it up. It'll take a little more time. It will go on floor next year. I can't talk anything more about it.

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