Jennifer Lawrence Curated

Talented female movie star

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This profile has been added by users(CURATED) : Users who follow Jennifer Lawrence have come together to curate all possible video, text and audio interview to showcase Jennifer Lawrence's journey, experiences, achievements, advice, opinion in one place to inspire upcoming actors. All content is sourced via different platforms and have been given due credit.

  • But you were rocking the boat several years ago when you came out talking about the differences in pay for men and women doing the same job.

    I felt this frustration that women in every field felt, which was: I'm trying to negotiate, and we're going through the numbers, and I'm seeing that the numbers aren't adding up, and it's like you just keep hitting a wall where you can't get paid more, [and] if you ask for more, we'll hire somebody else, and the whole movie will fall apart. They'd rather pull a whole movie apart than pay me fairly. And when the Sony hack happened, I was like, "You know what? Fuck it. I'm not the only woman who's going through this. If everybody's looking at it anyway and everybody's talking about it …" I didn't see an option other than saying something. I had just had it up to my fucking eyeballs.

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  • What's the best advice you've been given?

    It was probably by you. You just said it under your breath. You were talking, and then under your breath you said, "You have to teach somebody how to treat you." That's the smartest thing I've ever heard.

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  • How do you choose what you're going to do next?

    It's chemistry. It's like meeting a boyfriend. Red Sparrow [March]was sexual, and I haven't done anything sexy or sexual. I've been afraid of that since 2014, when I got my pictures hacked. I just thought, "I'll never do that again. I'll never share that part of myself ever since it got shared against my will." And then when I said yes to Red Sparrow, I felt I was taking something back.

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  • I read this wonderful book by Elizabeth Strout [Anything Is Possible]. And in it, she was speaking about one of the characters who was so embittered and regretful, and the line she used was, "because her life did not turn out the way she had expected." Is your life what you expected?

    When I started acting, I was totally satisfied when I was on a sitcom because I had a steady paycheck. And I was like, "Maybe I can just find a way to be on sitcoms forever." I was totally satisfied and good. I never dreamed that I could have this kind of career.

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  • Jennifer Lawrence THE HUNGER GAMES Interview - Collider.com

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  • Twenty years ago, Katniss would have probably been a male character, and the two male characters would have been girls. How do you feel about that shift, in getting to be the strong female character at the center of this story?

    It’s great! I feel like, not only have we gotten to the place where we have a strong female lead, like Lara Croft being the female James Bond, we have somebody who’s not even the female James Bond. She is somebody who is literally really a young girl, being thrown into this situation and not knowing if she’s going to survive it. That says a lot.

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  • What did your sponge soak up from Woody Harrelson?

    Woody is the nicest person in the entire world. You know that he would be the exact same, no matter what his job was or what he was doing. He is just still that guy from Texas. He can strike up a conversation with anybody. It almost seems odd, seeing him on a movie set. He’s one of the most incredible actors in the world, and he almost doesn’t fit on a set. He’s just too relaxed. He has no air about him. You see him hanging out and it’s almost like somebody brought their really nice cousin from Texas, and then, all of a sudden, he's on camera

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  • How was it like to work with the camera all around you? Did that effect your performance at all, or did you just have to ignore where the camera is?

    No, you can’t ever let yourself be thrown by cameras. That’s never good for an actor. That’s also trusting your director. That’s why, when you’re reading a script, you find a director that you want to work with and make sure they’re somebody that you trust, so that when you see something odd or something different, you know [it will be okay]. I knew there was nothing to worry about. I knew the camera was behind me and that was odd, but I didn’t think twice about it.

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  • Do you have a favorite scene from the movie?

    Yeah, the scene with Stanley Tucci, before I go to the Games. That was just hilarious, to see that. That was also the moment that Katniss realizes that it’s a game, and if she wants a chance to win, she has to play along.

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  • When you’re looking at projects that you’re thinking of doing, do you consider who will be directing?

    That’s something I’ve always looked at. It’s always been about the script and the director, for me. There are directors that I want to work with and that I admire. You can love a script, but if it doesn’t have a good director, it won’t be that. I like to adapt to a director’s way of working. I love doing that. Each director is so different, and you have to adapt to this new way of doing something. That’s what’s amazing to me. That’s why I love directors. I don’t want to director to have to work around me. I think it’s more fun for me to come in on their thing.

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  • You’ve gotten to work with some very strong directors. How does Gary Ross compare? What’s his style?

    He doesn’t even have one. He can communicate with every single actor. He can make anything work. I’m better with technical stuff. Just tell me what you don’t like and I’ll fix it. Don’t tell me to think about [something hypothetical]. That doesn’t work for me. Just tell me what’s right and what’s wrong, and just tell me what to do. So, he was very technical with me. If somebody else needed more emotional guidance, then he could do that.

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  • At some point, did you have to just let go of the book and concentrate on the script for the film?

    Yeah, when you’re making a film, the book is a huge tool in making the script. Once you have the script, then you’re making a movie and you have to let go of the book. As an actor, I held onto the inner dialogue. But, you do have to let go of the book, when you start making the movie.

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  • What did you find to be the most challenging aspect of stepping into the role of Katniss?

    That she was already in the minds of so many different people. Normally, when you’re coming out with a movie, nobody has really seen the character before. You’re just giving it to them. I’m playing a character that most people have already had in their mind, and heard her speak in their mind and seen her. That’s a scary thing to go into, knowing that so many people already have pictures or an idea of what your character is.

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  • On knowing her worth:

    “I get paid a huge amount of money to be able to do what I love,” she said, before adding, “I feel I know my worth, and I feel like I work to keep it that way…I can work with directors who I’ve admired for a very long time and get a screenplay written.”

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  • On living in New York at 14 with her 18-year-old brother:

    “It was terrifying,” she recalled. “I remember when my parents left the really crappy hotel we were staying in, they shut the door and my brother turns to me and goes ‘We’re gonna die.’ We’d go to Duane Reade and keep rewashing the same plastic cups from there until they started to mold. We were disgusting.”

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  • On dropping out of middle school to pursue her dream:

    “I dropped out of middle school I don’t technically have a GED or a diploma. I am self-educated.” When asked how she knew she was meant to follow this path to Hollywood, Lawrence said: “It’s so hard to explain. It was just an overwhelming feeling of, ‘I get this. This is what I was meant to do.'”

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  • Did you get hurt in the set of Hunger Games

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  • Jennifer Lawrence Gives the No-Filter, No-B.S. Interview of Your Dreams - Glamour

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  • Do you feel like you're misunderstood in any way?

    I don't feel like I'm misunderstood. I feel like I'm over-paid-attention-to. I'm not trying to be a GIF. I'm not trying to be a picked-up-on-Twitter quote. All I'm trying to do is act. And I have to promote these movies. And I am, at the end of the day, I guess, a f--king lunatic. So if you record what I'm saying, it's gonna be goofy. [Laughs and throws arms out.] What do I do? What do I do? I'm just a girl, sitting in front of the world and asking them to forgive her for speaking.

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  • And then how did you decide to take a stand about [fair pay]?

    It was so personal that it was scary.… I keep going back and forth on being opinionated. I completely agree when there are actors who say, "Actors should stay out of politics. We're not politicians." [And] my business is based on everybody buying tickets and seeing my movie.… It's not smart, businesswise, to be opinionated. But then what's the point in having a voice at all if I'm not going to use it for what I truly believe in?

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  • You mentioned Kentucky before. Do you feel like there's a Kentucky part of your personality?

    My cousin and I were talking last night about what we wanted to do with our dead bodies. And I'm like, "I want my ashes scattered on Lake Cumberland." And when I said it out loud, I was like, "Wow. You really are still rooted in your redneck [ways]." [Laughs.] But basically it's a certain grit. Everything's very family oriented. Nobody knows or cares about designers. I care! But I didn't used to.

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  • When you first got into acting, you said you felt like you weren't connecting with what was in school; you didn't feel smart in that situation. Then you read a script, and you were like, "This is where I'm smart." Do you still feel that connection when you read a script?

    Yeah. I'm addicted to work. And acting. I don't know how to describe it—reading a script is like a map. [But] it's on set, finding that character, feeling the emotions, getting that adrenaline—it is such a rush. Developing a character is the only thing in the world I feel 100 percent confident in, that I understand. I still have that feeling from being a teenager: "I'm good at this, and I like this." So I want to keep doing it, because it makes me feel good about myself.

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