Jasleen Royal Curated

Indian singer, songwriter and composer

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This profile has been added by users(CURATED) : Users who follow Jasleen Royal have come together to curate all possible video, text and audio interview to showcase Jasleen Royal's journey, experiences, achievements, advice, opinion in one place to inspire upcoming singers. All content is sourced via different platforms and have been given due credit.

  • It was director Vikas Bahl (who has been accused of molestation) who got you in the world of Phantom Films. What kind of person you have found him to be?

    I remember chasing Vikas after watching Queen. I got Ghoomketu, a film made under Phantom Films banner because of him. He was extremely busy as he was working on Shaandaar but he heard my couple of songs and in the initial couple of meetings, he was very encouraging. I don’t know the truth behind the allegations, but personally, I found him to be a really kind and nice person.

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  • What will keep you busy in the coming months?

    There is Fukrey 2 and I am working on Sunny Deol’s son’s launch movie.

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  • Being a composer of many love tracks, are you a romantic at heart too?

    Even though I am happily single, I feel that love is all around us. I love my God, my family, and friends. Also, I’ve no time to chill out but I am not complaining. This is what I have always wanted to do. I am happy that my friends tolerate my mood swings.

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  • What do you like more — composing or singing?

    I enjoy both. I want best of all worlds.

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  • How were your Delhi University (DU) days?

    My DU days were very special. I always wanted to come to Delhi to get more exposure. And I also always wanted to come DU to get exposed to different kind of music. I was an ECA quota student and participated in many college fests. My friends used to show up for my gigs when no one used to. Playing the guitar and jamming at the Virgin Tree in my college (Hindu College) will always be a cherished memory. Also, it was during college, when I went for India’s Got Talent.

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  • Has being a self-taught artiste impacted your work anyway? Positive as well as negative?

    Even if I were trained, I am sure I would have to go looking for work like I have and relentlessly keep visiting production houses. But there are pros and cons of being a self-taught musician. When people tell me to do a certain kind of music, I never say no because I have always been experimenting. My first reaction has always been to say ‘let’s try this’ but when you belong to a certain school of music, you have restrictions and limitations. But then, trained singers have such great control over their voice. So, the idea is to keep learning. I don’t have regrets. It’s not even like I am very content with what I have achieved. But I am in a good place. I’m still getting to do the kind of work that I feel like doing. It’s a dream come true to be working with people whom I’ve grown up idealising. I’m working a lot and there’s so much more music that I want to create. And also I’m doing a lot of live shows from Bangkok to Dubai. I recently performed at Jesus and Mary College too.

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  • Was it fun for a Ludhiana girl like you to be part of a project that was based in Punjab?

    Yes, indeed! I remember sitting with Anvita Dutt (the writer of the film) and my mom packing makki di roti and saag for us. And, at Mika’s place, we enjoyed some delicious butter chicken. All in all, it was this big fat Punjabi-bonding happening throughout the film.

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  • You seem to have begun the year on a good note.

    This year has just started and it has been great overall. Phillauri is doing well. I got to collaborate with Mika Singh for the Anushka Sharma film at such an early stage of my career. It was great!

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  • You’re a self-trained musician? Does that restrict you in any way or is it creatively liberating?

    There are pros and cons. I have learnt by observing and experimenting. I just do anything without restricting myself. There is never enough. The idea is to keep learning.

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  • Are you interested in cutting a private album or putting out some singles, as is the trend these days?

    I just want to make music. I have released singles in the past and those have got picked up by films and now, I am composing for films. I am still doing what I love. I don’t have indie and film categories in my head.

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  • For one of the songs, you collaborated with the Dharavi rappers. How was the experience of creating that song?

    It’s the prank song in the film, where the kids play all sorts of pranks on their teacher. The film gave me scope to experiment and while researching for different sounds which would justify the world of the film, I got to meet the rappers — David Klyton, Yoku and his friends. We jammed and it was like a party to be working with them!

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  • There are not many female music composers in the playback industry. Do you think the scenario is changing or that much more needs to be done to encourage more female composers?

    I honestly don’t have an answer to that! It’s not like people are biased towards male composers. I have always looked up to Sneha Khanwalkar.

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  • How was the process of composing all the songs for Hichki?

    It was a challenging film to do and a great deal for me to compose for the entire film. The brief for every song was different as the music had to help the narrative of the film.

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  • Who are your inspirations when it comes to music? And what kind of music do you listen to?

    My inspiration includes AR Rahman, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, Coldplay, the Bee Gees — I listen to music that is lyrically and melodically strong. I like my music to flow, if you look at my compositions, and that’s how I approach most of my compositions.

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  • What are the compositions close to your heart and why?

    All my songs are close to my heart, but if had to pick I would say Jahan Tu Chala from Gully Boy, Teri Dastan from Hichki, and Kho Gaye Hum Kahaan and Nit Nit my latest single. Jahan Tu Chala was composed for my friends. We were on a trip to Goa for my birthday, spent a lot of time with each other, talking our hearts out with conversations that brought us closer and people opening up without fear of judgement and that’s the most beautiful thing – the people connect. Nit Nit is close to me as it stars the star of my house, my dog Kobe and our life together. I like Kho Gaye Hum Kahan because it’s one of the first albums I worked on and it got such a great response from the audience. Even after two years, people are going mad over it, and I see a lot of covers being made on it. I realise good music is going to reach whenever it has to. I love Teri Dastaan from Hichki because I related to the character of Rani Mukherjee

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  • You are a self-taught artiste. Has the journey been different because of this?

    I am a self-taught artiste and I have learned by listening to people or observing them, so it’s been different because I don’t have any rules in my mind.

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  • Tell us how composing for Bollywood was like.

    Hichki was a project close to me, and so was Veere Di Wedding as Rhea and Sonam Kapoor gave me my first break with Khubsoorat. I felt that the music of Hichki was a little underwhelming, but I keep seeing people posting the song and also hearing it on TV often. Teri Dastan, the theme of Hichki plays as a background depicting the lives of contestants in reality TV shows, and so it’s reaching the right kind of emotions, for sure.

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  • You recently said you don’t fit under any label. What kind of musician are you?

    I don’t think I fit any label. I would like to believe I can do anything as long as it connects to me and that I can express through my music. What moves me is the right music and I continue to do that.

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  • You started with Indie music scene and also won an MTV award. You later made your foray into Bollywood. How has the transition been? Read more at: https://yourstory.com/herstory/2020/05/singer-musician-composer-bollywood-jasleen-royal

    The transition has been smooth. As a child, I loved poetry and also wanted to be a composer. I composed music for a poem Panchi Hojavan by Shiv Kumar Batalvi and posted it on YouTube and got some eyeballs, and won me the Best Indie Song award at the MTV Music Awards. I met Sneha Kanwalkar, who gave me my first Bollywood break with Preet in the Sonam Kapoor-Fawad Khan starrer Khubsoorat. I remember cold-calling Amit Trivedi asking to work with him. I have always followed the music that connects with and reached out to people whose music I like. I am also working on a film right now.

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  • Tell us a little about your growing up years

    I was born and raised in Ludhiana and visited my aunt in Dehradun often. I studied B.Com (Honours) at Hindu College, Delhi University. I remember playing the mouth organ and guitar for the ECA trials and getting through. I am a self-taught musician with no history of music in the family.

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  • What is your earliest memory of music?

    My earliest memory of music would be my older brother teaching me to single Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star when I was four years old. I had to keep figuring it out until I got it.

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  • Recently, Anushka Sharma made her wedding entry to your song “Din Shagna Da” from Phillauri. How does that make you feel?

    Overwhelmed! I remember working on the song for her engagement sequence in the film, and once again it came to life when she walked down the aisle to the song on her wedding day. The wedding was the talk of the nation, and suddenly everyone was sending me video snippets of her entry.

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  • Tell us about the earliest musical influences that have shaped you.

    I have grown up listening to all kinds of music. My mother is a fan of Gulzar. Maachis is one of her favourite albums. I have grown up loving poetry because of her. Lucky Ali, A R Rahman, R D Burman, S D Burman, Cat Stevens, the Beatles, Ray Charles are all on my favourite list.

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  • You have mostly self-taught playing instruments like the guitar, mouthorgan, tambourine, and keyboard. Tell us how you became a one-woman band.

    I didn’t have any formal training in music since my family isn’t inclined towards music. Moreover, there are no good music schools in Ludhiana. I would drive from one end of the city to another on my scooty, chasing anyone who could teach me music. I would go to the local gurdwara to learn to play the harmonium and tabla and pestered my music teacher at school to teach me chords and carols. I ended up playing several musical instruments at the same time.

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  • You have composed music for the upcoming Rani Mukerji-starrer Hichki and Karan Deol-starrer Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas. What do we look forward to in these albums?

    My first solo album Hichki is special to me for more reasons than one. I have invested a whole year in Hichki. As part of many musical experiments we did with composing the music of the film, the song “Oye Hichki” uses utensils, tubs, and spoons. Also, we worked with four Dharavi rappers for “Madamji Go Easy”, another song in the film. Then there are quirky lyrics like “Vasco Da Gama, Columbus Ka Mama, Ghar Na Thikana, Tiffin Se Khana.” A number of traditional musical instruments like dhol, stash, and cough beat-boxing have been used to give this song a raasta (street) feel. I hope the effort, sweat, and social cut-off (my friends blame me for) that has gone into the making of this album comes across. As far as composing music for the Deol family is concerned, it is every Punjabi’s dream come true. My father would be very proud of me.

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  • You have composed music for the upcoming Rani Mukerji-starrer Hichki and Karan Deol-starrer Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas. What do we look forward to in these albums?

    My first solo album Hichki is special to me for more reasons than one. I have invested a whole year in Hichki. As part of many musical experiments we did with composing the music of the film, the song “Oye Hichki” uses utensils, tubs, and spoons. Also, we worked with four Dharavi rappers for “Madamji Go Easy”, another song in the film.

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  • After Hichki and Veere Di Wedding, what are you working on?

    My next projects are Gully Boy (directed by Zoya Akhtar and starring Alia Bhatt and Ranveer Singh) and Gulab Jamun (Anurag Kashyap’s film that may have Aishwarya Rai Bachchan and Abhishek Bachchan in the lead).

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  • How were you in academics?

    I was a bad student. I completed B.Com (Hons) from Delhi University. That decision was basically just to move out of Ludhiana and pursue music in the Capital.

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  • Lyricist and singer Swanand Kirkire was also seen with you in your composition, Maye ni. Do you see him as a role model?

    Not a role model but a great friend, supporter, and someone who has encouraged me since the beginning.

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  • How different is it to work on independent compositions and those for a film?

    It is way more challenging to work on a composition for a film because you have to cater to a storyline and a director’s vision for a situation. Cinema is a medium to communicate and reach out to a larger audience.

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  • What does commercial success mean?

    A song never becomes a super hit in one day. It takes weeks, months and sometimes more than a year. Sometimes, it is a hit even before the movie releases and maybe after months of release. Gradual success is better than an instant one because it helps you stay grounded and focussed on future projects. By the time a song becomes a hit, we are so immersed in the next project that we almost forget about it.

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  • Who has been your role model?

    For girls to succeed and fly, a family has to give her wings. There was no discrimination between me and my brother. My family could see me playing keyboard and they never asked me to stop.

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  • Why do you think there aren’t many women music composers in India?

    From what I have understood over the years, women in India do not have many role models in this field. There are not many names they can admire, follow and dream to be. Maybe that’s why music composition as a career is hardly an option for women. To opt for the field and start on a journey that is replete with struggle, one needs inspiration and encouragement.

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  • You started with indie music and your debut track, Panchi ho jaavaan, was a hit and won an MTV award. Now, with all the Bollywood assignments, do you miss the indie music scene?

    The song was based on a poem by the great Punjabi poet Shiv Kumar Batalvi. My independent compositions are very valuable for me. That is how I started and reached a point that I got big Bollywood assignments. Even today, whenever I get the time, I sit down, scribble lyrics and compose. One should never stop being creative. It would have been very easy for me to sit and just sing what is given by other music directors and composers. But that is not what my passion is. I have been playing multiple instruments since the beginning, so in no way can I stop creating independent compositions. I have no label and still do what I like.

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  • What's your personal take on to create music ?

    To create music you need to look within, that's what creates something original. Your personality and experiences and emotions shape up your music. Sometimes while experiencing a block I try to break away from my immediate surroundings and go for a walk or a drive in nature or let my thoughts marinate while I do something else. I have no fixed process but I create what resonates with me.

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  • Tell something about your music journey ?

    I started working at the age of 14 as a music tutor. I taught myself how to play a number of instruments; I do not have any formal training. However, it is my dream to someday attend Trinity College, London or Royal School of Music. I love the quality of voice of Lt. Asa Singh Mastana. Even though I did not win India’s Got Talent, my participation helped me gain popularity. I feel the number of female professionals is steadily growing in every field. I’m so glad that the number of women in the music industry is also increasing.

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  • Who will you refer to as your music influencers or whom you got inspired for the music from ?

    My mother used to love listening to poetry by Shiv Kumar Batalvi, so I grew up listening to his work and enjoyed it a lot. Panchi Ho Jawa, the first song I ever composed was also written by him and it was because of my mother and her fondness of his work that I chose this particular song.

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  • What do you like more — composing or singing?

    I enjoy both. I want best of all worlds. I was an ECA quota student and participated in many college fests. My friends used to show up for my gigs when no one used to. Playing the guitar and jamming at the Virgin Tree in my college (Hindu College) will always be a cherished memory. Also, it was during college, when I went for India’s Got Talent.

    View Source:

  • Has being a self-taught artiste impacted your work any way? Positive as well as negative?

    Even if I were trained, I am sure I would have to go looking for work like I have and relentlessly keep visiting production houses. But there are pros and cons of being a self-taught musician. When people tell me to do a certain kind of music, I never say no because I have always been experimenting. My first reaction has always been to say ‘let’s try this’ but when you belong to a certain school of music, you have restrictions and limitations. But then, trained singers have such great control over their voice. So, the idea is to keep learning. I don’t have regrets. It’s not even like I am very content with what I have achieved. But I am in a good place. I’m still getting to do the kind of work that I feel like doing. It’s a dream come true to be working with people whom I’ve grown up idealising. I’m working a lot and there’s so much more music that I want to create.

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