Hans Zimmer Curated

Film Score composer and Record Producer

CURATED BY :  

This profile has been added by users(CURATED) : Users who follow Hans Zimmer have come together to curate all possible video, text and audio interview to showcase Hans Zimmer's journey, experiences, achievements, advice, opinion in one place to inspire upcoming artists. All content is sourced via different platforms and have been given due credit.

  • Viggo Mortensen says the one thing he does before a role is ask himself what happened literally from the time the character was born until the first page of the script. Do you go that in depth as the composer as well?

    On Sherlock Holmes it was really great getting Robert Downey Jr. to just come hang out and talk to him because he knew his character so well. I shamelessly used him and used all the research he had done into his character. “That’s what we do: we try to tell a story as well as possible and try to figure out new ways that haven’t been done before.”

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  • Do you have to like the movie to compose a good score?

    I have to like the movie, of course that helps. Who wants to work on something they don’t like? But more importantly I usually like the movie because of the people involved. It is so collaborative, so most of the time it’s about the director and that is sort of the inspiring part. Gore Verbinski for instance, if I go really far, he will figure out a way of pushing me further. Because that’s what we do: we try to tell a story as well as possible and try to figure out new ways that haven’t been done before

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  • Are you ever around on set when you score a film?

    Every once in a while… But I don’t leave my room much as you can probably tell – I work a lot.

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  • How do you take that kind of research and turn it into music?

    There is an overall design of what is the best thing for the overall film, but you very quickly go into the characters. And really, if you think of all good films, that usually holds true. I once asked Penny Marshall, “How do you make a good movie?” and she said, “It’s very simple: protect your star.” In other words protect your main character. Don’t make your main character say something stupid, don’t make your main character wear something silly, and don’t put him into situations that are out of character. As long as you do that, you are usually going to tell the story in a successful way.

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  • Do you ever regret not studying music formally?

    The problem of not having gone to music school and not having gone to university is that every time I start off on a movie it is a whole new journey of learning. It is always a struggle. But on the other hand that is what makes it fun.

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  • Well you have composed the score for classics like Rain Man, Gladiator, The Dark Knight Trilogy, and your Oscar-winning score for The Lion King, so there doesn’t really seem to be a need to grow up?

    But each and every single one of these movies at one point or another presented an insurmountable problem and it’s always the same thing: there’s a point where I go, “Oh my God I have no idea how to do this,” or, “I am not good enough.” Somehow at the end of the day doing something that actually resonates with people is quite rewarding and keeps me going.

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  • Is it easy for you to leave work at work when you go home to your family?

    Well, I become a little bit of those characters, so when I work on very depressing movies, like when I was working on The Thin Red Line I wasn’t a lot of fun to be around, let’s put it that way. It’s such a strange life being a film composer because you are not living in reality at all. You are forever in that dream world that a movie is. My grasp of everyday reality is actually very bad.

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  • Do you not even listen to The Lion King score you did?

    You know, what happens is that I come home and the last thing I want to hear is anything of mine. But the kids all started playing piano and cello and they now play my stuff. I sort of love it and I sort of hate it at the same time. To them dad doesn’t do anything special. Dad supplies them with more notes that they can have fun with. “Every single movie at one point or another presented an insurmountable problem and there’s a point where I go, ‘I have no idea how to do this.’

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  • Do you ever listen to your own film scores?

    Never

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  • Mr. Zimmer, what kind of music do you listen to?

    It’s all over the place and it really depends on my mood. Duke Ellington said something very cool in the ’30s. He said there are only two types of music: good music and bad music. So stylistically I am truly all over the place. I will put on the White Stripes followed by ABBA followed by Kraftwerk and then every once in a while I have to get a really good dose of Bach.

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  • You've lived a lot of lives. how do you feel about playing music in your sixties?

    Which other crazy guy do you know that at age 60 suddenly decides, "Okay. Let's go and play Coachella." Remember, the operative word in music is play. You play music. All we try to do is get better at being playful. It might not be the worst way to live your life. I keep looking at people who don't play music and I'm saying, "Just because you don't play music doesn't mean you can't go and take a little bit of that onboard. Make it playful. Make it an adventure. Make it stand of the abyss of the blank page and see what happens."

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  • Your process seems fluid. It seems like a conversation. Then there's that this element, which is the audience speaking to you and who you're speaking to as well. There doesn't seem to be any beginning or end.

    No. Why should there be? It's all process. I'm writing one long score. It's called my life. How many deaths have I written? How many kisses have I written? Each one, I try to do it differently. I try to get closer to the reality. I try to get better at it. "Better" is the wrong word. I'm trying to find out what's hidden from me and what's hidden from the audience. I'm trying to peel back the layers and actually get to the essence of what it all is.

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  • When's the last time you did something you consider a failure?

    A true failure? I'm pretty obnoxious at not letting anything leave my studio which I think is complete and utter crap. I remember working on The Da Vinci Code. I remember the first time playing it to Ron Howard. Literally from the first moment, I just knew it was wrong. Halfway through the movie, I just stopped and I said, "Please don't say anything. I'm just going to start over."

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  • What makes a good Nancy Meyers score compared to a good Christopher Nolan score?

    Actually, Nancy's coming over in a little while. She had an idea that she wants to talk to me about. The key is to write a romantic score without it becoming sentimental. I actually get to be a little more funny than people expect me to be. The downside of having worked with Chris on The Dark Knight and Inception, all these things, suddenly people expect the only emotion I'm capable of is absolute German bleak darkness, that everything I do is tinged by some Kafkaesque hole that we all disappear into.

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  • When you were looking those people in the eye in the desert, what was the energy that you were getting back from the crowds?

    I mean this with great love, but it was astonishing to see grown men cry when we played The Lion King. I did feel emotional too. The set I did on tour is very personal. I finished with that piece "Time" from Inception which, again, I'm never going to tell you why it was there because it's so personal to me. "Time" finishes just with me playing the piano for far too long and far too quietly. To have complete silence. It was the deafening silence during that piece that got to me, where I thought we were really connecting.

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  • Can you elaborate more on your music tour?

    It was my musician friends who had gotten on my back and said, "Hans, eventually, you owe it to the audience to look them in the eyes. You can't hide behind a screen for the rest of your life." I thought [it'd be] interesting to see if music can stand on its own two feet and we don't show a single image of film. I am terrified that we're losing the relevance of orchestras, that orchestras are just going to disappear. Hollywood, whatever you want to say about it that is horrible—and all those things are true—but the one thing you can't take away from Hollywood is that on a daily basis, it commissions orchestral music.

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  • Would you consider Nolan to be your most significant collaborator?

    Maybe. That's a tough one because it depends on which part of me you're addressing. If it's a comedy, I will go and tell you that Jim Brooks is a lot better at writing a great funny line than Chris Nolan is. As Good As It Gets was just as intense in a funny way, even though it was a comedy. Working with Ron Howard on Rush was a different thing. It addresses different parts of me. Actually, you made me realize something just now, that each one teaches me how to be better for the next project.

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  • which movie you did, you felt like there was no stone unturned?

    Here's a thing about me: Even if the movie is a huge success I always will go, "Yeah, it's okay. I think we could have done better." For once, I can honestly say, Dunkirk, I think we left no stone unturned. It was seven months of working ridiculous hours and then going home, then going straight to bed, and dreaming about it all night long. It never left me alone.

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  • Do you regret the Inception brass?

    Do I? No. It makes me smile. When it's in one of a thousand trailers, it just becomes a device. A noise. There's a big difference between a story point and just some random sound effect that sounds good. I don't regret that we did something which was weird and crazy and atonal and actually quite a horrendous, angry sound. Suddenly, everybody jumped on it and started to embrace it. Sometimes they embrace it too much.

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  • What kind of mathematical ideas are in the score?

    There are a couple of ideas in there that I want to keep hidden for two reasons: One, I don't want you sit and watch the movie and try to work out what the mathematics of it are, because that destroys the elegance of having an experience. Secondly, ever since we did Batman Begins, anything Chris and I did somehow has managed to find its way into other people's movies in one shape or the other. If you think about the crazy low brass section in Inception, that is a story point. It was a story point in the movie. It was written in the script, and suddenly it turns up in everybody's trailer. I am going to tiptoe around a couple of things, but I am going to give you as much information as I possibly can.

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  • Zimmer discussed a number of the projects he’s been working on, including the latest James Bond film No Time to Die, but clearly, he was most excited about the score he is currently developing for Dune.

    “Right now I’m in the middle of making these sounds. I just have these ideas, and it’s like this every day. I’m doing all these experiments, and I have no idea if any of them will ever really end up in the movie. But we are so dedicated, trying to do something different, to do solid and honourable work, and do justice to the book… And some of them will probably be complete and utter disasters. But I’m having a go. Absolutely full on. I’m being obnoxious and telling people I need more time. The usual… I’m driving everybody crazy on Dune because I’m so full of ideas. And it’s Denis, you know? He lets me be part of this world. It’s totally and utterly inspiring, and it’s great people I get to work with – scrap the word “work,” it’s great people I get to play with.”

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  • What characteristics in BMW you will try to encapsulate in the score you do?

    “We now have the opportunity to go and create the most beautiful sonic landscapes in the world. One of the things I love about BMW, other than being a Munich boy, is that it has maintained its DNA, which I think is really vital. It’s not just any old car. No matter how strange the thing looks, you know instantly it’s a BMW. Isn’t that great? People want that sort of car because it enhances their identity. And we can play a little bit within the confines of the language of BMW.”

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  • You and Vitale created sounds for the BMW Vision M NEXT concept car, and will now create the sounds that will characterise BMW’s future electric cars. Since when and what is your connection with BMW?

    “You have to realise that my history is steeped in BMW. Quite simply, when I was a child my family always drove BMWs. I remember every night standing on the balcony listening to the car noises because when mother was coming home I could absolutely identify the sound of her engine, and when I could hear that engine coming up the driveway everything was fine.”

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  • 'Dunkirk' was the hardest thing we ever did', how challenging was it?

    “This is Chris Nolan’s film, and when I was writing, it didn’t matter if he was sitting in the room with me or not sitting in the room with me, every note, every thing, every gesture, every sound I made, I felt like Chris’ hand was on top of mine and what I love about this score is that it is truly integrated into the movie. Chris wrote the screenplay like a piece of music, he didn’t use notes, he used words and images, and I used notes to paraphrase the structure that he had already established.”

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  • how was the experience of doing the score of Dunkirk?

    “’Dunkirk’ was the hardest thing we ever did, i demoed up a 100 minute piece that became a grid of tension. Sometimes I wanted to take the easy way out, after being on the same problem and not having gone to sleep for 24 hours and I’d go home, I would grab a bite to eat, go to sleep and dream all night about it, so it never left me. And Chris just wouldn’t let me take the easy way out, ever. He would say ‘you came up with this idea, let’s go and solve it, let’s go and see it all the way through,’ and it’s that rigorousness, that sticking to a specific idea. What great directors do is they cheer you on, even if you just want to give up. Because they know that if they cheer you on, they help you solve the problems and we are solving their problems as well. We are making a better film in that moment.”

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  • “Dunkirk” is the your sixth collaboration with director Christopher Nolan, tell me about the sonic world you trying to create?

    “We merged the images with the sound so completely that you are really listening to things with your eyes,” he explains. “We’ve managed to create a new experience, making it a whole experience, where the sound, the music and the visuals are of one storytelling experience.”

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  • I wanted to ask you what your experience was like taking Klaus Badelt's original score for the first Pirates of the Caribbean movie and adapting that for all the sequels and what it was like trying to take an original piece from someone else and make it your own or what you were gonna keep the same.

    It was actually my piece. I wrote it in six hours or something. Yeah, it was actually all the themes were mine. [LAUGH] But… Sometimes life gets a little complicated. [LAUGH] And that's not, and let me not take away from Klaus in any way. I had written these tunes and sort of set the tone of it. But there was at first no way I could go and actually do the movie because I was supposed to be doing another movie. And it really Gore had, Gore was a friend.

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  • What did Chris Nolan introduce you to, about doing music for Interstellar?

    Roger Penrose. You know.... I knew the connection between Escher and Penrose. Weirdly, you know, I suppose it's the sort of general background, you know. I mean, I was very, you know, I was very familiar with Jung and the whole dream idea, etcetera. So this was a very, and it was just great for me to be able to go back to this.

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  • You state in interviews that you've like studied the Fibonacci sequence for before The Da Vinci Code or read about Escher before Inception and this fable for Interstellar, and I'm wondering how text and concepts kind of influence your film scores when composer traditionally are writing for picture.

    That's a great question, because I know that the book, Escher, Godel, Bach was a big influence on you.

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  • You have created an interesting environment though where you have your studio which is like a whole block in Santa Monica.

    yeah

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  • For Interstellar, you locked yourself away and do you follow regular hours?

    No, I [LAUGH] Okay, let's just get one thing straight, I don't work. You know, music, the operative word is play. You know, and I, you know, my, I have an idea. And another idea. And another idea. And, you know, I'm, if you ask, you know, if you ask me to come for dinner at 7:00 PM, I'm going to go great, I'll be there. And at 10 to 7:00 PM, I'm gonna say to you, I'm gonna be 10 minutes late. And then the next time I look at my watch, it's 1:00 AM in the morning and I didn't even notice. And you're gonna be really pissed off with me. [LAUGH] But it just…

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  • What environment is most conducive for you in your creative work?

    Good question. Because for instance, Interstellar, because it takes place so much of it takes place with people in complete isolation. I actually last year, last summer I sort of, I have an apartment in London. And I just locked myself away and didn’t see anybody for a month. I just lived that hermit life, you know. And then Hannibal, you know, shooting in Florence, God, that was really tough being there [LAUGH] and it was, you know…

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  • Do you doubt yourself?

    [LAUGH] No, hang on. I, there are days where I doubt myself doubting myself. Those are the good days. [LAUGH] The rest of the time it's just sheer mayhem, panic, neurosis, paranoia, everything. [LAUGH] No, I mean, oh God, I mean, how often am I on the phone to Chris? You know, here I am, you know, Mr. Technology with this beautiful studio and I'm playing something to Chris over the phone going, I don't know, is it any good? Do you think I should just junk it [LAUGH] or do you mean? Or… The main thing that a director can do for the composer is or no, the main thing the composer needs to do is it needs to remember that the director is there to cheer you on. The director wants you to succeed because if you succeed, you'll be helping the film. And they are truly your conscience. And they're truly your guide. And it's okay to and this is another thing I learned from Penny. It's okay to say, I have no idea what to do. I mean, I'm lost.

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  • Do you have a favorite score of your own?

    No, not really. You know, in my hubris I still hope that I'm gonna write something where I can go that's pretty good.

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  • Do you have that emotional charge today in your work still?

    The lack of education means, the lack of having something I can pull out of a drawer, means I have to find something in any movie I work on that is intensely personal. You know, it might be just something like a left hand corner of the screen, there’s something going on, something that nobody is saying elegantly in words or pictures, you know, I have to find my place in this movie. And most of the filmmakers that I work with, sort of know this, and know how to lead me there. So yes, there is. I’m pausing, because you know, 100 movies are going through my head at the moment where I’m literally thinking oh, this is actually about this, this is actually about that.

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  • How did you get to make your first film, World Apart, set in South Africa?

    Well, again, it’s very much to do with the times. Two things were going on. There was a new television station in England called Channel Four. And they needed material, and Stanley and I had these friends, Tim Bevan and Sarah Radclyffe, who founded a company called Working Title Films. And Stanley he knew how to make movies. Tim and Sarah hadn’t actually done any movies. Chris had, he was the DP on The Mission, and Killing Fields, etc. I mean, amazing DP. But none of us really knew how to make films, actually before that, we did My Beautiful Laundrette. I think couldn’t have been made in any other times because Margaret Thatcher was in power. And you always need something to push up against. And My Beautiful Laundrette was very political. It really was pushing up against things.

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  • Were you working with Stanley Myers at the same time as you had the band, or did one come after the other?

    Well, we had no money. We weren’t as interested in making a song as we were in making a little movie. We had no budget, so I was working for Stanley during the day, and from 10 o’ clock ‘til nine AM, we would be allowed to use that studio time at the studio and work on the song. Which wasn’t an entirely healthy way of living. And so we finished this thing, and you know the only way you could have a success at the time was you had to get on Top of the Pops, which was this program on Thursday night, I’m sure you remember. And we had made this video.

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  • And you had a band called The Buggles. tell us about it?

    Oh yeah, The Buggles. But unfortunately not a B, Mozart. You know, just perfection. I just had a very interesting conversation actually, with Jean Michel Jarre, and a couple of other friends just being at my studio. And Jean-Michel Jarre was explaining, really where electronic music came from, and he said, and I think it’s very true, that in Europe, we were so influenced by American music, I mean The Rolling Stones took their name from a Muddy Waters song. So the blues was everywhere.

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  • Who in particularly, were your influences?

    Let’s just go through all the composers with B. There’s Beethoven, Bach, Bartok, Beatles, Burt Bacharach, come on, we can just carry on, do you know what I mean!

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  • What were the early musical influences on you? Do you think of yourself as English, German, or American?

    I think about this frequently, I mean, I’m homeless, in a funny way. My culture I think is completely rooted in German 19th century music I suppose.

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  • Did you learn how to write music?

    The honest truth is that it was just traumatizing with the piano, with the authority of the piano teacher, getting rapped across the knuckles, and so whenever you put a piece of music in front of me, there’s a Pavlovian reaction where it starts off. The eyes go weird, right? But I have a good memory. I have an ear. And I think one of the things which always is forgotten in music class, is the first thing you have to do as a musician is you have to learn how to listen. And I mean, I’m a geek and I’m a nerd, and I can listen into any piece of music. I think, I can usually tell you what orchestra it was, I can usually tell you what hall it was in. I can tell you, obviously who the conductor was, and who the composer was. And I can usually tell you what microphones they were using.

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  • What do you play?

    It depends on the mode I’m in. I, actually I’ll tell you what I play. I play the computer. No, look, don’t laugh about this. I mean all music is based in one way or the other, or influenced through the ages, on technology. I mean, a violin is nothing more than a piece of wood and a dead cat. But it’s a piece of technology. So when computers came along, in the '70s, I suddenly thought, hang on a second, this is interesting. These things can become an instrument. So I just became very interested in them, and started, playing with electronics. I think it had something to do with that my father was an inventor and I came from a fairly technical [background]. So again, it’s the idea of play. My father had a think tank, which is very similar to having a band. And I could see their process. Process is important in what we do, and if we can keep a playful…there’s an adventure in, you know, in new technology. I keep making it adapt to things it wasn’t designed to do. And so yes, I play the computer. And I play guitar.

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  • Do you play?

    Yeah. I play, not technically correct. But I’ve got great feel. I mean I can honestly say that.

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  • What’s your first memory of music?

    My mother took me to the opera, I was either two-and-a-half or three years old, in Zurich. I think these days, your mother wouldn’t be able to take you to an opera about a bordello — I saw the Seraglio, the Mozart opera.

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  • Do you dream of music?

    I have, rarely, and usually I can’t remember it. There’s one incident where I really did remember it, which was Dark Knight Rises. I dreamt that whole sort of insane Bane opus. And, so I wrote it out, and went to Warner Brothers and said you know, I had this idea, and I don’t know if it’s going to work. Have I earned the right yet to go to London and get a rather largish orchestra for a couple of days? And if it doesn’t work out, if I think it’s terrible, can we just sort of throw it in the bin, and you’re not going to say to me you just spent half the music budget? And they thought for a second, and they went, yeah, go on, do it. And it really turned out great. It was more about how to reinvent working with the orchestra, more than anything.

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  • I’ve heard with Christopher Nolan that he likes to work at eight in the morning. You like to work at eight at night. That’s the problem.

    Well, there there are times when we get to meet. It’s actually really nice, because Chris comes over in the evening, and we have a comfy couch. And it’s much more casual that way. He did get me to go to a screening at eight o’ clock in the morning once, and I didn’t quite make it through the movie.

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  • It seems you are a night person?

    Well, yeah. I get all my good ideas sort of at one o’ clock in the morning, and I tried for a while to behave like normal people. And I still would get my good idea at one o’clock in the morning and just be incredibly tired and not be able to execute it.

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  • Whats the most scariest thing for Nolan about music you do?

    the scariest thing for him is to expose his heart in music, but the bond he formed with Nolan during nine years' work with him dramatizing Batman gave him courage.

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  • Can you tell us about the watch Nolan gave you?

    At the end of the filming of Interstellar, Nolan gave Zimmer a watch. "On the back it says, 'This is no time for caution,' " said Zimmer.

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  • Early stages of Interstellar score, tell us about that?

    In one night, hans wrote a four-minute piece with piano and organ. "I really just wrote about what it meant to be a father," said Zimmer. "And [Nolan] came down and sat on my couch and I played it for him. He goes, 'Well, I better make the movie now.' And I'm going, what is the movie? And he starts describing this huge journey, this vast canvas of space and philosophy and science and all these things. And I'm going, 'Hang on. I've written you this tiny little thing here.' And he goes, 'Yes, but I now know what the heart of the story is.' So he was writing with this piece of music sort of keeping him company all the way through the writing process, all the way through the shoot."

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  • And yet, for all your musicianship, you still suffer from crippling stage fright?

    “It was these guys I worked with – Marr, Pharrell Williams and others – who sat me down and said to me: ‘It’s all very well being in a dark room hiding behind a computer doing nothing in real time. But there comes a point in your life where you have to actually be responsible, and accountable, and look the audience right in the eye’. People come to see these shows because they loved the movies"

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  • How do you reinvent film scores and what do you think how should pop music be reinvented?

    “Verse, chorus, verse, chorus, middle eight…” he says. “It’s always the same bloody structure. I end up going ‘no wait a second, this is not how life works’, and suddenly you go off and decide you need something completely different here, and that’s what film music allows you to do. People are desperately trying to reinvent pop music without realising one of its inherent flaws. They need to go and throw the structure out.

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  • Together, you and Greenaway have assembled a diverse set of virtuoso musicians working for you, how is that experience?

    “It really is so wonderful how music brings us all together,” Greenaway says. “It’s a family. You hear half a dozen languages round the dinner table, people jumping from one language to another, but the core is this musical storytelling that Hans has given us the framework for.”

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  • What according to you youth of today wants to listen?

    “Everybody tells you that the youth of today, whoever they are, have a short attention span, and you can’t give them anything decent,” he says. “That’s complete crap. The youth of today, just like anyone else, like a good story and want to be transported, and to have an experience. They don’t want to be bored, so as long as you move the emotion along, you can do whatever you want to do.”

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  • You’ve been scoring films for something like 35 years now. Do you ever tire of it? Does it ever get old, writing music for movies?

    Yeah, it does. And then something like “Dune” comes along with somebody like [director] Denis Villeneuve. And you have to remember that Joe Walker, the editor on the film, he and I did our first television series for the BBC in 1988 [“First Born”]. I’m driving everybody crazy on “Dune” because I’m so full of ideas. And it’s Denis, you know? He lets me be part of this world. It’s totally and utterly inspiring, and it’s great people I get to work with – scrap the word “work,” it’s great people I get to play with.

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  • What about “Top Gun?” Are you splitting that with [original “Top Gun” composer] Harold Faltermeyer?

    It’s his tune. We were all friends of Tony [Scott, who directed the original]. I knew Harold from Munich. Harold and I are not just from the same town, we literally grew up in the same neighborhood. If you really want to have a good time, go to Munich, find Harold, and get him to take you to some of the restaurants. On this movie, I just wanted to be his arranger.

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  • let’s talk about “No Time to Die,” the Bond movie you scored earlier this year. What was that experience like?

    Here’s the thing. I didn’t know if I wanted to do it. So I phoned [guitarist] Johnny Marr, and I said, “I have two questions to ask you. First question is, what’s the only guitar part worth playing in a movie?” And he said, “the Bond part” [the James Bond Theme]. And I said, “yeah right. Second question: Do you think I should do the movie and would you play the guitar part?” So that sort of settled that. Johnny wanted to bring guitar back into the score. We were just embracing our inner John Barry [the English composer who established the Bond music traditions back in the 1960s]. Billie Eilish and her brother Finneas came up with this great song, and we did a bit of that. It was great, because we played the BRITs [Feb. 18], Johnny played guitar, and we were moving forward. Suddenly it became a No. 1 hit, and the movie was going to come out, and then everything stopped.

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  • What can you tell us about the score you are working right no during the pandemic?

    I’m a huge fan of [blues guitarist] Derek Trucks. We got together with [violinist] Ben Powell and [composer] Dave Fleming to do this movie with Ron. I knew Derek was touring. Everybody was recording wherever they were. Now I’m working on “Dune,” and “Top Gun,” and I think we’ve finished with “SpongeBob” (“SpongeBob Movie: Sponge On the Run”).

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  • What about “Hillbilly Elegy,” which reunites you with director Ron Howard, which Netflix seems to be positioning for awards contention?

    We were finishing “Hillbilly,” we had one screen, which was the movie, and then we had about 15 people just on Zoom. Luckily, it’s working with people that know each other very well, because [this process] is really much harder. It’s much easier to stand in a room with a hundred musicians and say something once, and use body language and be present, than to do anything over technology.

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  • Amid pandemic, have you been spending time at your studio, or are you working at home?

    No. I used to have a sitting room, a living room, but I built a studio [at home]. I was working in London until things got really bad, then I came back here, around the beginning of March. I was working on “Top Gun: Maverick” there. Tom Cruise and that whole team was supposed to start “Mission: Impossible 7,” but they couldn’t start their movie, so they all came back, and we started playing around on “Top Gun” a bit more. In fact, I’m doing something on it today.

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  • In light of our current national conversation about race, about BLM it seems especially relevant now?

    Yeah. I wish it wasn’t, if that makes sense. That was the reason I wanted to do “Lion King” again, because I thought, “Let’s be inclusive. Let’s just go and celebrate this.” It was wonderful.

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  • You’re being honored for your “Lion King” score, played by an orchestra that you specifically designed. It may have been the most diverse orchestra ever assembled for a Hollywood film ?score.

    Yes. I really do not want to pat myself on my back, but I think there was something very important and very good that we actually managed to get done, which was to make a new orchestra: a Black Music Matters More Than Ever orchestra.

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  • how it happens that 2020 despite the pandemic, is turning out to be his busiest year ever?

    It’s like, I’ve never been busier. I’m trying to keep it super-busy because most of my musician friends have had their gigs cancelled. So I’m loving that I have a lot of work, because it means I can keep a lot of musicians busy – in Australia, in Europe, in England, in America. I’m sort of working on four continents. Time zones are not my friend right now.

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  • what's the role of technology in your musical journey?

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  • What was so special about the Organ instrument in which the interstellar soundtrack was recorded?

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  • Where did Interstellar sound track recorded and why?

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  • Where was Interstellar sound track recorded and why?

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  • Where did Interstellar sound track recorded and why?

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