Govinda Curated

Indian film actor, comedian and dancer

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This profile has been added by users(CURATED) : Users who follow Govinda have come together to curate all possible video, text and audio interview to showcase Govinda 's journey, experiences, achievements, advice, opinion in one place to inspire upcoming actors. All content is sourced via different platforms and have been given due credit.

  • Shiamak Davar said that many stars are dancers, but only you feel a song you enact.

    I thank him for saying that. I have respected the dancing styles of Jeetendra, Shammi Kapoor, Dilip Kumar, Amitabh Bachchan, Mithun Chakraborty, and others and danced to their songs on stage. All I will say is that Kathak and Bharatanatyam, for example, have ‘bol’ as their language and that is the way to best communicate, without speaking. That has a purer and bigger impact.

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  • So how did it feel when you first became a star?

    Actually, it was Pahlaj Nihalani-Ji who first said that after his “Ilzaam” I would be a star, though “Love ‘86” was my first release and was a hit as well. When Pahlaj-Ji showed me my check, I could not sleep for four nights! I bought a saree and a gold chain for my mother and felt very good! Like seeing a ghost, I have seen poverty. During the Emergency, I remember that every day there would be only dry (sukhi) roti and watery toor dal. For days, we would not have vegetables. I think that people like me who come from stark poverty have a different attitude to money than those who are well-off when they come into films. I remember my mother telling me that I was hunting for work during my struggle (taqleef mein kaam dhoondh rahe ho), but a time would come when I would be having complaints about my work (kaam mein taqleef). But she advised me to keep working, for whatever is written in my stars will happen! Button link to Education Expo form Next Up NEXT UP Madhuri Dixit to Join Over 25 Music Artistes in Virtual Concert Madhuri Dixit to Join Over 25 Music Artistes in Virtual Conc… FEATURED Bollywood Actor Govinda: ‘I Am a Product of Numerology!’ R.M. VIJAYAKAR, Special to India-West Nov 20, 2018 0 Govinda Interview Govinda with his wife, Sunita. The actor told India-West that till he was Govind Ahuja, he had nothing, but when his mother changed his name to Govinda in 1986, his number became 9, and he became a success. (photo provided) Facebook Twitter WhatsApp SMS Email Save MUMBAI—With Govinda, what you see is what you get. There is not even a hint of sham or pretense, which is why, when I first met the actor at Mumbai Airport on the way to New Delhi for the music launch of his “Bade Miyan Chhote Miyan” two decades ago, I felt I had known him for 10 years within 10 minutes of a chat. It’s been a while since we last met (after some more meetings) but Govinda slips into informality and a huge chunk of Marathi when speaking to me. We speak about his superstitions, “FryDay” as well as his new film “Rangeela Raja.” Excerpts from an interview: Q: A question I always wanted to ask: you would sign films earlier because they had titles of old Dharmendra movies. Why? A: I firmly believe titles make films run as well. I signed “Shola Aur Shabnam” and “Aankhen,” which did very well. “Dil Ne Phir Yaad Kiya” flopped, but not because of the title, which was that of a hit Dharmendra film. Q: Your wife had a picture of Dharmendra in the room when she was pregnant so that the child would be handsome. A (Evades the question): I kept Dharmendra’s and Dilip Kumar’s photos in my house as both of them were very good to me. Do you know that when I signed up an absurd number of films after becoming a success, Dilip-saab told me to quit 25 films! I told him I had spent the signing amounts. But he told me, “Borrow money if you must, but leave them!” and I did. And Dharam-Ji did so many films with me. Q: But you are also very religious, and superstitious. A: I am not one of those who secretly do a lot of pujas, prayers, and yagna and wear teekas on their foreheads at home and then go and appear modern outside! (He makes a ‘Yo!’ gesture with his fingers). I do everything openly. What I feel I say, there is no duplicity. Even with numerology, I was a product of it. Till I was Govind Ahuja, I was no one and had nothing. When my mother changed my name to Govinda in 1986 and my number became 9, I became a success. My bungalow, my car—all of them are number 9 now. I am lucky to be counted among less than100 stars in a country of 100 crore people. Q: So how did it feel when you first became a star? A: Actually, it was Pahlaj Nihalani-Ji who first said that after his “Ilzaam” I would be a star, though “Love ‘86” was my first release and was a hit as well. When Pahlaj-Ji showed me my check, I could not sleep for four nights! I bought a saree and a gold chain for my mother and felt very good! Like seeing a ghost, I have seen poverty. During the Emergency, I remember that every day there would be only dry (sukhi) roti and watery toor dal. For days, we would not have vegetables. I think that people like me who come from stark poverty have a different attitude to money than those who are well-off when they come into films. I remember my mother telling me that I was hunting for work during my struggle (taqleef mein kaam dhoondh rahe ho), but a time would come when I would be having complaints about my work (kaam mein taqleef). But she advised me to keep working, for whatever is written in my stars will happen! And that’s what happened. At 23, I played a father out to save his small kid in “Hatya.” People advised me against doing this serious film at that age and with my image. They again warned me against signing “Marte Dam Tak” opposite the scene-stealing Raaj Kumar at such a young age. But that film too was a hit, and I did one more film, “Jungbaaz” with Raaj-ji. They told me not to take up “Izzatdaar” with Dilip-saab. My only answer was that I should take up whatever work I was being offered. In “Dariya Dil,” actually Kader Khan-saab was the hero. I was second hero to Shatrughan Sinha in “Ilzaam,” and god knows which number I was in “Sindoor!” I did a negative role in “Kill/Dil.” So, people assume and presume.

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  • You would sign films earlier because they had titles of old Dharmendra movies. Why?

    I firmly believe titles make films run as well. I signed “Shola Aur Shabnam” and “Aankhen,” which did very well. “Dil Ne Phir Yaad Kiya” flopped, but not because of the title, which was that of a hit Dharmendra film.

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  • At the beginning of the ‘90s, you starred in a couple of movies which borrowed their title from Dharmendra’s successful films, for example, Shola Aur Shabnam (1992) and Aankhen. Would you like to share the reason behind the move?

    It all started with Shola Aur Shabnam. The movie turned out to be a hit at the box-office. The title of my next film Aankhen was also taken from his 1968 film of the same name. This film also emerged as superhit at the ticket window. This kept happening for a long time, I think. I believe that the fate of a film depends a lot on its title. Titles of Dharam Saab films’ proved lucky for me.

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  • It’s often said Govinda steals the thunder from other actors when he is there in any scene? How do you look at that?

    See, when I did Marte Dun Tak with Raaj Kumarji, I was the second hero. When I did Izzatdaar, I was the second hero.  Sindoor(1987) had more than three leading heroes. In Dariya Dil (1989), Kadar Khanji was the hero. I was just the other hero in the movie. I did Ilzaam (1986) where Shatrughan Sinhaji was the hero. So I never had the time to even think whether or not I can steal the thunder from somebody. When you do hard work, you don’t get time to think about competition and all of that.

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  • In your prolific career, you have tried everything, from comedy to action to romance. But when you attempted serious cinema, the audience did not accept you much. Why?

    I don’t believe in that. When I signed Hatya (1988), many people laughed at me. They said I myself look like a kid, how can I play a father in the movie? Many people objected to my decision. Some suggested that I should stick to regular song and dance movies, which I was doing in plenty at that time. But I did not listen to them. Had I paid any attention to their advice, I would have slipped such an amazing film from my hand. When I signed Marte Dum Tak (1987), a lot of people came to me and asked if I had gone mad. They said I would be overshadowed by Raaj Kumar’s presence in the movie. I was playing a don in the film. People made fun of that also, because I was just a 23-year-old young boy at that time. I did Izzatdaar (1990) with Dilip Kumar Saab. I played a don again. If the truth is to be told, I never listened to what people had to say about me and my choices. I was getting work. I was lucky. Many people don’t get work. So I accepted whatever interesting offers came to me.

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  • What keeps you going even after spending so many years in showbusiness?

    This is an infinite world; we cannot correct each and everyone around. So it’s always better that we keep improving ourselves first. There is not pointing fighting with each other and arguing over petty issues.

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  • Apart from your acting skills and impeccable comic timing, you are also known for your electric dance moves. Some say that you used to learn dance by watching Mithun Chakraborty’s films.Is that true ?

    Yes, that’s true. Not only Mithun Da, but I also used to watch Jitendra, Shammi Kapoor, Dilip Saab and revered Amitabh Bachchan’s movies to learn dance. I have performed on their songs on stage. All these people are gems of our industry, our country. I feel blessed to get an opportunity to rub shoulders with these revered actors.

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