Gerhard Richter Curated

German visual artist.

CURATED BY :  


  • At what point did you start to tear photos out of magazine and keep them with you?

  • Just like photographs do you think paintings are sometime direct and sometime oblique?

  • How do you know that your large abstract has come to an end?

  • What is so bad about fame?

  • Who inspired you to become an artist?

  • What made you feel you wanted to be a painter?

  • You decided to leave the east. Was that for personal reasons or artistic reasons?

  • At what point did you start to tear images out of magazines and keep them?

  • How did you select the images from magazines?

  • What is the source of the images that you take?

  • Why did you move from painting images to abstract painting even though it harmed the market?

  • Do you think paintings are sometimes direct and sometimes very oblique?

  • Do you work on two paintings at the same time?

  • How do you know you are finished with your painting?

  • How do you know you are finished with your painting?

  • Why di you want to make objects being a painter?

  • When you look back at the past 60 years of art how would you sum it up personally? Do you still believe in power of art?

  • When you look back at the past 60 years of art how would you sum it up personally? Do you still believe in power of art?

  • Do we need beauty and solace?

  • Mr. Richter, do you still recall why the board with the pattern composed of triple digits was created more than forty years ago?

    It was a prototype for the printer that produced the series of 1260 Farbfelder prints. After all, I can mix the colors myself for a painting. For a print, the colors are mixed in the printing press, and this board was needed for that. The colors for the paintings were the basic colors of yellow, blue, and red, out of which all of the fields were created, each one with a different ratio. The number 175 stands for one part yellow, seven parts blue, and five parts red.

  • Mr. Richter, do you still recall why the board with the pattern composed of triple digits was created more than forty years ago?

    It was a prototype for the printer that produced the series of 1260 Farbfelder prints. After all, I can mix the colors myself for a painting. For a print, the colors are mixed in the printing press, and this board was needed for that. The colors for the paintings were the basic colors of yellow, blue, and red, out of which all of the fields were created, each one with a different ratio. The number 175 stands for one part yellow, seven parts blue, and five parts red.

  • How it is that you first began to make paintings?

    When I was a child, at 15 or 16, I made watercolors, landscapes and self-portraits. I remember doing a watercolor of a group of people dancing. It was quite a nice one.

  • How it is that you first began to make paintings?

    When I was a child, at 15 or 16, I made watercolors, landscapes and self-portraits. I remember doing a watercolor of a group of people dancing. It was quite a nice one.

  • Are you always thinking about how to make a timeless object?

    It's not that I'm always thinking about how to make something timeless, it's more of a desire to maintain a certain artistic quality that moves us, that goes beyond what we are, and that is, in that sense, timeless.

  • What’s the difference between “real art” and “decoration”? Have you made a decoration?

    Anyone can look at anything and think it’s decoration, even a Rembrandt. I created a cathedral window in Cologne, Germany. That window in Cologne is simple and… artistic decoration but still decoration. But that doesn’t bother me. It’s still enticing.

  • Sometimes your abstract paintings give the impression of a landscape. Are you looking for realism again in abstraction?

    I believe I am looking for rightness. My work has so much to do with the reality that I wanted to have a corresponding rightness. That excludes painting in imitation. In nature everything is always right: the structure is right, the proportions are good, the colors fit the forms. If you imitate that in painting, it becomes false.