Farhan Akhtar Curated

Director, Screenwriter, Playback singer, Producer

CURATED BY :  


  • Do you sit with writers in your preparation of the character?

  • Which actor had the most influence on you personally?

    "De Niro's a huge influence yes. Wow. I don't know. I'd definitely love to work with Mr De Niro. I've been a huge admirer of his work, like I said, from a very young age. He's probably one of the reasons I was drawn to what an actor can do. You must also understand that when we were growing up there were actors doing some really great films and Mr Amitabh Bachchan was a case in point. "The fact is they were very eager to change themselves in each part. And they were very good at what they did and they did it extremely sincerely and you loved them for it. But for me when I was looking in from the outside what someone like De Niro was doing, he was just constantly becoming another person in every role that he did and that was very fascinating for me to see. "I think probably a combination of being a huge fan of Mr Bachchan and of course a huge fan and admirer of what De Niro was doing and I think the influence on me was in enjoying the acting talent in people and enjoying performance.

  • who are the Indian star and the US star you might like to pit against each other in a film?

    Who to pit against who? I don't know. I think if I had a choice I'd like to be in a film with De Niro.

  • When writing for your films is there naturally a lot of yourself in your characters?

    "Some films allow that. Others don't. For example, I wouldn't see myself at all as a character like Karthik in Karthik Calling Karthik. So some films allow that to happen and some don't. When it does then it's nice because you can always draw a lot from your experiences and draw a lot from people that you know and who are friends and bring that into the relationship of the character that you're writing about or pretending to be. But it's rare that that happens. "Excel - our company - is associated with various people who keep telling us, 'You keep making films about friendship and friends', but realistically if you think about it, we've been making films now for 13 years, and out of that 13 years there's been three films that are really about friends. It's just that people remember those films, which is why it's kind of associated with us."

  • What is the personal ethos with which you approach life and films that makes you so apparently fearless?

    "I don't know. I really don't know. After Rock On!, when I started acting and I sang in the film, people asked me, 'What was the need to sing in your film?' and things like that. I really don't have an answer for it. In terms of what made me do it? It just felt like the right thing to do. What the challenge is I don't know. "I feel it probably goes back to a time when, if you remember the character Lakshya which was played by Hrithik - the thing I connected with that character was that he was so directionless and that was me at a certain time in my life. Which is what I could completely identify with. Like, here's a guy who's a happy person, but at the same time really doesn't have the focus in terms of what it is he really wants to be. And I always used to feel that that's okay because time itself will play out with the need or the importance to start doing something. "I think at that time, the worry that everyone had, mainly my parents and my sister was maybe they thought that my life might not amount to much or what is this guy going to do? There seems to be no future. Things like that. I think probably it just goes back to where it almost became a challenge to do something. And I think that fire gets accelerated every time something comes along that tells me, 'Why don't you give this a shot?' And once you've committed to it I think that's another side of a personality of not holding back or doing the best that you can possibly do. "I think the need to constantly keep trying new challenges, accepting new challenges and moving into different fields and saying 'OK, let's see what happens' - I think that probably comes from saying, 'OK, I have to now either prove to myself or the person that is most stressed out about this', which at that time probably was my mother. It probably comes from some kind of latent, residual impact that that had at that time in my life."

  • What has been the effect of MARD campaign to promote gender equality on both men and women in India?

    The heartening thing is, like you, there have been so many people supporting us who write in. Whether it's on social network or those who get in touch with the organisation that we've set up, where people are constantly receiving mail and forwarding it to me. Of course I do reply when they ask me something different, not something that you can get from the information on the website, whether it's something they want me to know or something that they want to share from their own experience. "It's heartening to see the amount of people who share this concern. So that to start with makes you feel optimistic. It starts making you feel that it's important to keep heading down this path and keep the volume up. I feel as far as change in society goes that is probably going to be something that is generational rather than overnight.

  • What are your future plans for MARD organization?

    We're trying to reach out to younger boys, younger girls. And we're starting to get them to understand from a very young age about the importance of gender equality. How an imbalance in that can really mess up society at large and it can manifest in crime or it can manifest in violence against women, whether it's a rape or underage marriages, or it can manifest in female foeticide. It can manifest in many different things. "So just starting to get people to understand the importance of this equality is crucial. Because that's where we really start seeing change at a larger level like we want to. So hopefully we'll keep at it and we'll stay at it. It's a lifetime commitment. Hopefully we'll start seeing the benefits of everyone raising their voice together."

  • How much of importance is clothing along with overall grooming to you?

    I think first impressions are pretty lasting. We all have certain synapses in our brain that make us form some kind of an opinion about someone, when we first see them, depending on how they look. More often than not, when you get to know that person better, they could either live up to that opinion or live down. But you have to agree that first impressions do matter, and I think how you dress and behave has a lot to do with that. I feel up to a certain degree, clothes you wear are a representation of your personality and who you are. And to an extent that is what reaches out to a person, first time that they meet you.

  • According to you what is the one thing that never fails to make a statement?

    It would be difficult for me to say because everyone has a style of their own and take on what they feel works for them. I feel it’s important to be comfortable in what you wear, and by that, I don’t mean badly fitted and loose clothes. I mean, you should feel happy in what you wear, and that happiness should reflect in the way you are, and wherever you are.

  • What describes your style of dressing best?

    I will say sharp - casual sharp, sharp casuals, sharp formals, and sharp informal.

  • Following trends or being a trendsetter, what describes you best?

    We all need inspirations. It’s very rare that work happens in a vacuum. You get inspired by others, draw from their works, from fashion, from art, and from watching a film styled in a particular way. So, we all need those impulses to draw upon but eventually, what you translate it into, matters the most. What you wear depends more on your sense of style and how you can put things together and make it kind of your own. So, I really think, it is a combination of the two because we have to draw inspiration from somewhere thus making it easier to think about the possibilities. Once you know this, that’s when your core and personality takes over. So, it’s a good combination of inspiration and your own interpretation of it

  • Is it true that your mother was very concerned and hopeless about you at one point of time?

  • Why did you choose to work on a film like "The Sky is Pink"?

    When you sleep at night and when you think about the choices you’ve made, I don’t ever want to feel that I wish I hadn’t done that film. People had told me not to. You know, I’d rather fail on my own belief system.

  • Do you get attached to the characters you play?

    Talking about how he gets attached to characters, Akhtar said his character, Aditya Shroff, from Abhishek Kapoor’s Rock On!! stayed with him the longest. ”It reintroduced me to my love for music which I had completely put aside. It woke me up to a whole universe of parallel expression for me. That’s the film that has done the most.”

  • As "Sky is Pink" was a hard learning movie, did you learn anything from the movie?

    he said it helped him deal untangle complex issues with people who matter to him. ”A lot of learning, like how important ongoing communication is (in a relationship) is something I learnt through this film. Maybe I should’ve learnt that a long time ago when I was younger,” he laughed. “There are certain moments that take you to a certain place. You don’t want to fight it. You wanna go with it and let that carry you. A lot of learning that happened through the relationship that I had with my ex-wife. And now, after all of it (separation), we’re now arriving at a place of being friends in a way that I’d like to be.”

  • Does the creative success of a movie depend on Box office success?

    Akhtar also spoke about how we’ve started basing the definition of creative success only on box-office. “Right now when a film releases, the only thing people are waiting to know is - what’s the number? Earlier it was just the trade and the producer, now it’s people. People who’ve nothing to do with trade are wondering, “Kitna Kiya.” Arrey, aapko kya karna hai? Did you like it or not?”

  • Does the creative success of a movie depend on Box office success?

    Akhtar also spoke about how we’ve started basing the definition of creative success only on box-office. “Right now when a film releases, the only thing people are waiting to know is - what’s the number? Earlier it was just the trade and the producer, now it’s people. People who’ve nothing to do with trade are wondering, “Kitna Kiya.” Arrey, aapko kya karna hai? Did you like it or not?”

  • Are you good at cricket?

    “It was embarrassing,” he says, recounting his time at a ‘friendly’ game of cricket in his building. “I was hit for some four sixes and bowled seven wides in an over; one ball landed at my feet,” he says. “I was playing after 8-9 years. I thought it would be like cycling, which you never forget, but clearly not.” To make matters worse, his abysmal performance was witnessed by Gaurav Kapur, who is one of the anchors for the Indian Premier League (IPL). “He told everyone on the IPL circuit! So when I went to Kolkata to perform at the inauguration, some cricketers asked me if I play cricket well,” he laughs, adding, “so now I have to brush up on my cricketing skills. I sucked at it.”

  • Are you good at cricket?

    “It was embarrassing,” he says, recounting his time at a ‘friendly’ game of cricket in his building. “I was hit for some four sixes and bowled seven wides in an over; one ball landed at my feet,” he says. “I was playing after 8-9 years. I thought it would be like cycling, which you never forget, but clearly not.” To make matters worse, his abysmal performance was witnessed by Gaurav Kapur, who is one of the anchors for the Indian Premier League (IPL). “He told everyone on the IPL circuit! So when I went to Kolkata to perform at the inauguration, some cricketers asked me if I play cricket well,” he laughs, adding, “so now I have to brush up on my cricketing skills. I sucked at it.”

  • After being such a multi professional, how do you focus on one thing at a time?

    Honestly, I think efficient time management is all that you require. I try not to do everything at the same time. If I am directing a film, I do not always sing or act in it. Fortunately, I have a wonderful team to manage my time and handle my appointments. They make sure I do what I have to.

  • The lowest point of your life?

    It was when I had a serious clash with my mom. There was a phase when I would just loaf around, doing nothing. It had put my mom under a lot of stress. I knew her stress stemmed from her love for me, yet I never paid attention to her feelings. When it finally hit me that my idleness was taking a toll on her, I was genuinely sad and depressed.

  • How do you deal with your lows?

    Highs and lows are a part of life – personal and professional. Nobody is immune to feeling depressed. The best way to deal with your lows is to move on, do something proactive and start focusing on the next thing. You can sit, sulk and linger or you can use them as a learning opportunity and an experience of sorts. I choose to do the latter. However, I’d like to say that I wasn’t born with this understanding. I realised this over time.

  • You have some failures as an actor and a director, is there a difference, does one hurt more than the other?

  • The definition of success according to you?

    At its core, it probably means having the freedom of choice. That’s the biggest thing you can ask for, especially in a profession where you are defined by your choices. So, if you have the freedom to say ‘no’, you are somewhat successful.

  • Do you carry your work at home?

    Yes, my work does come home with me. There are people who successfully manage to switch off. I am not one of those people. Work does affect my personal life as it consumes most of my time. It takes away a lot from my family time. But work doesn’t stress me out. My family understands me and my personality. They know that my work is important to me and that when I’m working, my mind will be occupied. Sometimes, I do have my share of mood swings. I can get over it only on my own. I appreciate my family for being so supportive. At the same time, people at work, especially my partner Ritesh (Sidhwani) understands that when I am not working, I like to be at home. He values that. This makes it a good balance.

  • How did your kids react when the realized that their father is famous?

    When Shakya (13) was born, I was only directing films so I wasn’t really on TV but she used to love the music of Dil Chahta Hai a lot. But for Akira (younger daughter), it was very interesting. Rock On!! got released a year after she was born. And when she saw me doing the headbanging with those curls, she literally tripped out. Often she’d start playing her imaginary guitar, dance and try to play with her curls just like me. It was very entertaining for us. She has taken this character so seriously that till date, her eyes light up when she listens to hardcore rock music.

  • Is there any pressure of stardom?

    The truth is you do not change the way you lead your life because someone’s saying something about you. It is very natural for people to peep in other people’s lives. In fact, just because I’m a star, doesn’t mean I’m not interested in the lives of other people. It’s a human tendency. But ultimately, it’s only your work that speaks for you. If people are interested in you, it’s not because you wore a trendy blue pant and cool brown tee, but because they enjoyed your work. They care about you because they are connected to you at that level.

  • How much important is fitness for you?

    Fitness isn’t just about how you look. It’s also about how you feel. If you are fit, you feel optimistic and good. I want to stay fit and healthy all my life but definitely not at this high athletic level. I have gone back to my regular training schedule that I used to follow before I started training for Bhaag Milkha Bhaag. My usual schedule includes three days of weight training at the gym and two days of cardio exercises.

  • Do you make New Year's resolution?

    No, not really. I think everybody knows what they should be doing and what they should be focussing on.

  • Do you think that you have changed as a person?

    Wow, I don’t know, to be honest with you. I do feel that with every passing year, a certain sense of maturity keeps creeping in. So, you know, that does happen but I really don’t know how else I’ve changed. There are things I was doing 10 years ago that I’m still doing now. I am still as excited about work as I was then. I really don’t know what the major change is but I would hope, at least, that in terms of a certain understanding of things, in hopefully being a calmer person than I was 10 years ago, I’ve progressed.

  • The cinema has evolved from theaters to laptops and phones at home?

    To be honest, at that point it was recognising that there is an entire, a huge segment, of India’s population that is consuming content not in theatres — they are really happy to consume on their televisions or streaming services or on their laptops and phones and tablets. Every time you’d speak to this lot of people, they’d always talk to you about shows they’re watching from the US or the UK, but they were never really watching any Indian shows. So, we did realise that there is a huge void in content creation that needed to start getting filled. So, when the opportunity presented itself when Team Amazon met us and spoke to us about wanting to create something that could be a standalone show out of India itself, both Ritesh and I were extremely excited and we jumped at the opportunity, and Inside Edge was a script that had come to us not as a web series but as a kind of a film script. Somehow it suited this format really well, because you could really invest in all the characters and take a lot more time to tell the story. So we adapted it into that format and that’s how it happened, but it really started off by recognising that there is a void that needs filling, an audience that needs addressing that nobody is really talking to at the moment.

  • Did you think coming into the streaming space was a risk?

    Not really. I feel that people are very habitual in the way they consume things. There are people who love going to a theatre every weekend and nothing will change that. There are people who sit on their couch and want to watch something on their televisions or however they consume it, nothing is going to change that. Of course, once in a while, there will be an anomaly where something comes around that makes you want to get up and go or sit back home and watch, so that does happen but more often than not, you’ve created a sort of pattern where you like to watch something. I don’t think that because a show like Inside Edge or Mirzapur has done as well as it has done that when a film releases, the audiences going to watch it will be less. We are engaging with people in the theatrical space, which has given us the opportunity to engage with a whole new audience.

  • What is Excel going to do in the coming years?

    I’d say to further consolidate the stuff that we’ve got going, to really build on that and create more shows. I mean, of course, to continue to create the kind of films that we believe in. It’s really just that — to start consolidating what it is that we’re setting up. Even now, the streaming space is still relatively new. Although we’ve been very fortunate and had two exceedingly successful shows, it’s been new and there’s still a long way to go, so we’re just going to stay a little bit more focussed on how to consolidate this kind of good start, I guess, if you want to call it that.

  • When your read any web series' scripts, what parameters do you look for?

    I think there’s only one — whether it’s engaging or not. I think that’s basically it. If it’s engaging, it doesn’t matter what formula it is – those things become technical, but the important thing when you read episodes that are sent to you is whether it is holding your attention through and through. Are you really feeling, “Oh my god, I want to know what happens next”? That’s really the criterion for it, and then when you go further into it, there’s how well the characters are written, how believable the drama is.

  • Would you want to act in any Web Series?

    That would depend on what it is. Like I said, to me it’s a very exciting new world, and you’re really reaching different people, some of whom are aware of the kind of work you do in films, have watched your films and there must be many who haven’t. They know you in terms of what you do but I don’t know how familiar they are with you. It would be nice to engage with them but it would depend on what the script is and what the part is.

  • Do you enjoy the freedom provided by the online platforms?

    There is absolutely a certain liberation in being able to write scenes the way you’d like to write them, and allowing characters to speak in the way the world of that show wants the characters to be speaking — that does make a huge difference. It also increases the believability of the world for the people when they’re watching it. That actually is the crucial thing, you’re not doing it so you can be sort of sensationalist. It’s not about that, you’re trying to stay true to the world you’re representing and when that happens, people recognise that as well and they respect that.

  • Do you think the OTT platforms will ever overshadow the Silver screen?

    No, I think there’s going to be a happy coexistence between the two. I do feel that there is something very special about the cinematic experience of going somewhere — there’s something ritualistic about it. There’s a certain satisfaction, some kind of a feeling that that experience gives you, which is very different from watching something in the confines of your home. What may need to change is the kind of content that is created, what may need to happen is to increase the number of screens in this country now, because sometimes people have to travel very long distances to be able to watch a film in the theatre. That must change, it should be convenient for people to go to a theatre.

  • What kind of pleasure do you experience when you do live shows?

    It’s difficult to describe what that feeling really is. You know, it only truly works and people only truly enjoy the evening if you have zero barriers and zero walls and absolutely be yourself. That freedom of being in front of people that you don’t know, but at the same time feeling free enough and feeling loved enough to just be yourself, and the more you are yourself and the more you don’t pretend to be something that you’re not, is what they appreciate and that’s where the love comes from. It’s an amazing feeling, and it’s very liberating.

  • You're more open about your personal life now, have you changed as a person?

    It’s been a slow and gradual process over the last couple of years because for the longest time, I did not want to share images of my kids on social media. I just stayed away from it, but I did feel as time was progressing that I have a lot of joy in these relationships with my children, with my friends, with my partner now. Somehow, because of what we do, we constantly feel that we’re being watched, questioned or judged on some level, you create this defense around you where you want to kind of protect things or at least that’s what your mind is telling you, but I really felt that the more I can be open about who I am, the more I can be open about how I feel about things, about the people in my life, about the joy that they bring, about the love that there is. I just think it’s a nicer way now to just be, and there’s no secrets, there’s nobody having to second guess. You know what I mean? It’s just there and that’s how life should be — if you’re happy where you are and if you are in a place where you’re fortunate enough to be with people whose company you enjoy, with somebody that you love, there’s no reason to hide it. It’s nice, and hopefully it’ll make other people smile and get them to start feeling happy as well.

  • How has the impact been of your new lady love in your life?

    Changing my life right now, I mean, it sounds a bit extreme. Definitely, there is some influence of course, because of the kind of person that she is. That automatically has an effect on you and like I said, I don’t want to get into too many details about this, but I think what’s important is that I really do feel that through meeting her and now being with her, that there is a certain joy, there is a certain happiness in our relationship, in each other’s’ company. I turn to her for many things – for advice, for support, for just keeping things real. She has an amazing ability to keep things real, and I find that very admirable.

  • Do you remember the first time you met Shibani?

    Actually, we met on this show that I had done for some channel. It was a game show of sorts which was in 2015, if I’m not mistaken. After that, our interactions were very sporadic and as I said, sometimes life has these amazing, pleasant surprises for you, and one thing just kind of led to another.

  • Is parenting difficult? Is there a difference in the parenting of millennials?

    I don’t think you can compare the two, because times have changed so much. More than parenting, it’s the understanding of the father’s role in parenting that has changed a lot. I think there always has been a lot of clarity in terms of the mother’s role, but there was this strange thing — what is the father’s role, precisely? I feel like from the time I was a kid to now when I have kids, I do feel that — and it’s not just me, I’m not only speaking about myself, I feel this way about many young and new parents now — you see that the fathers are a lot more hands-on, more involved in terms of sharing time and responsibility. The relationship between parents and kids now is a lot friendlier. The way my kids speak to me and share things with me, it’s very apparent to me and I feel very happy about it that they are comfortable to talk to Adhuna and me about everything that’s going on in their life, and with absolute confidence that we’re going to listen, and we’re not going to judge, and will help as much as we can if there’s an issue of any kind.

  • Do you think that there is a paradigm shift in parenting in the more contemporary world?

    I think more than that, what has emerged over the last decade, if not slightly more, is recognising and respecting and empowering women to achieve dreams that they’ve had for themselves. Becoming a mother is not the end of a woman’s aspirations for herself, and I think that for a long time, at least in some kind of a traditional and patriarchal kind of way, the role of a woman was do what you want and then you get married and that’s it. That’s your life — that you are a mother. I think that’s changed, recognising the fact that women want careers and women would like to have a life outside of just being a mother, have their own experiences, whether it is to travel or learn something new or start a new business and do whatever it is they want. That requires time, and for more time to be made possible, the male partner has to step in and step up.

  • You are multi talented, which areas are you most competitive?

  • Are the rules of relationships changed? do you feel so?

    Well, I hope so. I would like to believe so, and you do see examples of that happening. That’s a very healthy thing. You’re creating something together, but that does not mean you don’t have ambitions outside that thing.

  • If you could remake Dil Chahta hai now, which three actors would you take?

    Probably Varun (Dhawan) to play the part that Saif (Ali Khan) played, somebody like an Ayushmann (Khurrana) to play Akshaye’s (Khanna) part and for Aamir’s (Khan) part, I would imagine somebody like Ranbir (Kapoor), I guess.

  • An Indian actor you would love to work with?

    I don’t have these kinds of fantasies. I just hope that I can get an amazing script, that’s what I fantasise about, and then the cast follows.

  • An Indian actor you would love to work with?

    I don’t have these kinds of fantasies. I just hope that I can get an amazing script, that’s what I fantasise about, and then the cast follows.

  • Ever thought about getting back on a director's chair?

    I get that all the time including suggestions on what I should make. Nobody says make an original film, they all want sequels. As a producer at Excel I have been working with so many different directors. It’s not that there’s a creative void that’s not being filled. There’s prep for my own films as an actor. It was a huge dream of mine to get an album out which happened. I don’t find myself spread thin but I do feel like I am doing a lot of stuff which is taking up my time in a happy way.

  • Apart from the 50 hats you wear, is there something else?

    It’s difficult to describe how things like this play out. I always feel that I have had certain people or music or films inspire me to do what I do. I have just been very fortunate to have met the right people at the time. You have to work really hard and be driven to do what you are setting out to do. It requires collaboration and people to believe in you. Ritesh and I were in school together and then parted ways after it. When he heard that I had written Dil Chahta Hai, we hadn’t met for almost five to six years. He had quit his family business and wanted to produce. We met again on that film and created this amazing partnership which has now lasted 19 years. There was no plan of wanting to act. Then Abhishek Kapoor comes to me at a club and says you are the guy for my script. The voice I want for this film is yours. He had no idea that I play the guitar.

  • Apart from the 50 hats you wear, is there something else?

    It’s difficult to describe how things like this play out. I always feel that I have had certain people or music or films inspire me to do what I do. I have just been very fortunate to have met the right people at the time. You have to work really hard and be driven to do what you are setting out to do. It requires collaboration and people to believe in you. Ritesh and I were in school together and then parted ways after it. When he heard that I had written Dil Chahta Hai, we hadn’t met for almost five to six years. He had quit his family business and wanted to produce. We met again on that film and created this amazing partnership which has now lasted 19 years. There was no plan of wanting to act. Then Abhishek Kapoor comes to me at a club and says you are the guy for my script. The voice I want for this film is yours. He had no idea that I play the guitar.

  • What was your first job in the industry?

  • What was it about Bhaag Milka Bhaag that first engaged you and made you want to commit to a role that is so challenging in so many ways?

    "It's a very moving, very compelling human story. To have a character whose story begins at partition, where he's orphaned overnight and arrives in India with millions of people as a refugee; and then really starting from nothing, finds the courage, the determination, to try to find his purpose and emerges as one of India's brightest sporting stars. It's an incredible story of how this actually transpired and what it took. "I must say I didn't know so much about the history of this man and I do believe that there's many people like me who don't. So via this film and by my involvement in it, we've done our best to bring it out to the masses and let people see what made Milkha Singh, MIlkha Singh. "We all know him as this iconic figure, but very few people know what his life was about. And his life is a real example for people to learn from, and not in the way that we're trying to teach anyone anything. It kind of happens organically when you hear his story and it inspires you and it moves you and it makes you feel like, 'Wow, I wish I could do something more with my life'. So all these emotions came to me when I first heard it."

  • Can you tell us about the training regime you went through to physically prepare yourself for Milkha Singh role?

    "I've been through the best available athletic training that I could get. So I really dedicated about a year and a half to get myself, not only physically looking that way, because that's probably the easy part when you work out and you follow a diet and things, but this allowed me to maintain a zone where you're feeling extremely competitive in terms of when you go onto a track. It does things to you. It makes you feel more like an athlete to start with when you're living the life and you're living by that kind of discipline. "Also there's a lot of races in the film because that's what he did and he grew and went from strength to strength through many contests. So just to approach those with the experience of having been an athlete and with the knowledge of what an athlete's life was like - that was very crucial. "The physicality of the role was the last thing that I wanted to think about when we were making the film. I just wanted to be there with the director talking about the emotion of this scene or talking about what communication is necessary and not really worrying about, 'Oh no, I have to run 100 metres' and then go and think about how am I gonna do that eight times a day."

  • What factors and influences that have driven you to such career successes far beyond your years?

    "Thank you so much. Well I feel there have been a lot of factors. I have been a fan of movies from a very young age and somehow the magic of that - every single time I hear something or read something that could be made into a wonderful film or something somebody is asking me to be a part of - that connects. It just makes me feel like I'm going to be part of something magical again. "I think that's the big thing, because if it's a big film of course that's how it is, but even more than that there's performances, there's music, there's the way it's photographed, the locations, it's an amazing, amazing world that you create. And that to me has been something that has always been tremendously fascinating. And I think this is why from a very young age I was committed to being part of the storytelling in whichever way possible."