Dua Lipa Curated

English singer and songwriter

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This profile has been added by users(CURATED) : Users who follow Dua Lipa have come together to curate all possible video, text and audio interview to showcase Dua Lipa's journey, experiences, achievements, advice, opinion in one place to inspire upcoming singers. All content is sourced via different platforms and have been given due credit.

  • With the coronavirus outbreak, musicians like yourself and others have been forced to get creative when it comes to performing and sharing your music. What's it been like doing sort of virtual performances and not going onstage where you get so much of that immediate feedback from people?

    You know, I only just this week did my second-ever livestream on Instagram. And it's interesting to see how we are when we're out of our comfort zone. You know, you're completely barefaced. And I think that it connects people on a different level because it shows that we're all the same, and we're all human. And I think that sometimes trying to make things like that interesting can be difficult - something that we all need to learn in the new age of social media. I think even after this pandemic, hopefully, we'll still be using everything that we've learned during this time to really connect with people on a different level.

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  • I assume you're at home like everyone else. How have you been spending your quarantine?

    Yeah. I've been doing lots of cooking and eating and catching up on those TV shows that I've never had the chance to watch.

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  • What are your thoughts on the supernatural?

    Well psychics scare me. I don’t know how real they are but I don’t want to find out. I like to believe in magic. I feel like there’s magic in everything

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  • If I were to hand you a book from the future, and it was the autobiography you wrote when you were 60, would you read it?

    I feel like I’d be curious to know what’s going to happen, but I don’t think I’d read it. It would scare me. I’d rather just take everything as it comes.

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  • Have you ever felt like you didn’t fit in?

    I’ve been the new girl a lot, in school. It’s tricky when you go in once everyone’s formed their friendships and you’re trying to figure out where you fit in. And you don’t know who to hang around with, because you don’t know who’s going to be nice or mean to you.

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  • Do you have one person in your mind?

    Not just one. I do like listening to other people’s music. And it’s not necessarily girls, I check out new music by guys as well. Sometimes when I find myself in ‘artists to watch’ lists with other acts I’ll go off and look at their stuff — sometimes you’ll watch a video and you’ll think, “oh, that’s cool”. Other times it is “oh shit — I’ve got to top that. I’ve got to be better than them”.

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  • If I locked you in a room for one hour with no phone, what would you do inside your head?

    I’d probably just go through my calendar and figure out what I’m going to do. I do that anyway — the second I’m without my phone, I think about what I’m going to do every day. I feel like the only apps I need on my phone are texts and calendar. I plan out my entire day: I know what time I’m getting up, I know what time I’m having breakfast, I know what time I’ll have lunch. Everything. Every step of the way. Is that weird?

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  • The tattoos on your thumbs are pretty good. What’s the worst you’ve ever seen?

    I suppose it’s when people get Tupac drawn on their legs. I haven’t seen it myself but apparently one of my friends’ girlfriend has HER PARENTS drawn on her thighs. Their faces.

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  • Did any of your writing sessions prove to be a turning point by not working out?

    There were loads of studio sessions where I went in and we didn’t really vibe in the room — in the beginning it’s hard to go into a room with someone you’ve never met before and just open up, but at the beginning of a session I try to get to know people before I start. You make yourself comfortable, you make them comfortable. I don’t want to just talk about my life, I want to talk about theirs. Sometimes they’ll have said, ‘tell me what’s going on’. But actually, it’s like, tell me what’s going on. It’s easier to open up to someone if you know them. There was a point after we came up with ‘Hotter Than Hell’ where I thought: I need more songs like this. So I was constantly going into sessions with the idea that I needed to write a song the same as ‘Hotter Than Hell’. But trying to create that just wasn’t working, and when I got my head around that and moved on and realised I didn’t need to be doing it, that’s when we came up with ‘New Love’ in New York, then ‘Last Dance’ in Toronto two weeks later. And ‘Last Dance’ particularly was a turning point, because I felt it was the sound I wanted my album to have.

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  • Do you feel an expectation that you’ll achieve a great level of success?

    I don’t know if pressure’s the right word. I feel like they believe in me to the point where they believe I can reach that point, which is the most amazing thing. They worked hard, I worked hard and together we’ll get there. It’s more reassuring, in a way: it makes me feel good about what I’m doing, and like what I’m doing is the right thing.

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  • Being pretty much by yourself as a fifteen-year-old in London: how did that change your personality?

    I became more independent and more confident. That plays a massive role in who I am and what I do today. If it wasn’t for me having to go out and meet people and talk to people, I don’t think I’d be like I am now, always thinking that the only person who’s going to get me what I want is me. Relying on myself. Obviously I have my team, who’ve done the most amazing job, but if I didn’t go out to meet them I wouldn’t be where I am. I felt like they didn’t find me, I found them. My management fight for everything to come from me and for it to be 100% my thing, rather than dictated by a record label. They make sure it’s 100% authentic to what I’d want it to be, rather than what they’d want it to be.

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  • What’s the closest you’ve been to arrest?

    Well. I was at my friend’s house in Marble Arch. We threw foam from our bubble bath out of the balcony down onto the street. Then the police came knocking on the door. We got a telling off. The thing is that apparently it hit him.

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  • Have you ever been arrested?

    No. I’ve never been arrested.

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  • How did you feel when you found out you weren’t on the BBC Sound Of 2016 shortlist?

    It was… I never really thought of it to start with — I felt I was too new. I got in so late that I just felt privileged to get on the longlist. Some of the other artists were already on their tours, some of them had more than one song that had been on the radio. It made sense that I wouldn’t be in the Top 5. Being on the longlist gave me the kickstart I needed and it put me on the map so I wasn’t too upset about not being on the shortlist. So yes, I think I was very okay.

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  • Re your ultimate vision for what you're doing, what size stage do you think you really need to be on?

    I want to perform in arena, but I also feel you need a body of work to be performing in really big venues. Maybe first album isn’t really the time. I think you need a lot of songs to do a long set in a massive arena

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  • I feel like you made a concerted effort to not include a lot of features on the album.

    It just worked out that way. Even when choosing features I like to pick different ones, people who you may not expect. I always wanted to establish my own sound first. Miguel and Chris Martin, they’re so different and special. I’m really grateful for it

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  • You have a lot of personal stories on the album. Is there one you were most happy to be able to get out to the world?

    Yeah, this song called “No Goodbyes.” It was the hardest song for me to write, because I was scared of someone knowing it was about them. It was really tough for me to talk about at that time because I was preempting what could be the future and I was still in that relationship. That was a tough one. But now that person knows it’s about them.

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  • You recently collaborated with Wale on his album, Shine. How did that come about?

    It was kind of funny. I was walking down the street going to the rehearsal studio and I get a text message from Diplo. He goes, “Hey, I hope you don’t mind but I asked a few people and I found your number. I have a song you might be into.” I was like, Shit, OK! I’ve been wanting to work with you for so long. Yes, please send it over. He sent me the song and I was like, Great, I’ll get you the vocals in the next few days. And I went into the studio and I vocaled the song. Wizkid and Wale were already on it. That was it, really. They’re like, “OK, great, Wale wants to put it out.” I was like, Fucking sick. Cool, let’s do it! And we just went for it.

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  • You’ve said before that you’ve been influenced by hip-hop music. Do you have a dream collaboration with a rapper?

    I’d love to work with Drake, I’d love to work with Frank Ocean, Jay Z , and Kanye. The list is endless.

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  • What were some magical moments that happened during the making of your debut album?

    Being able to work with so many incredible songwriters, to get to experience how their brains work and what it takes to write a song. I think that’s really magical. Being able to perform songs live, and every night when I go out on stage that’s the closest I’ve ever been to magic. It's really real.

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  • You worked on the album for about two years. What's the most important thing you learned about yourself during that process?

    I learned a lot about myself. I learned about the way I like to work, I learned to try to be as much of an open book as possible. That was really important for me to learn to be more honest with myself.

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