Chiara Ferragni Curated

Italian entrepreneur, fashion blogger, influenc...

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This profile has been added by users(CURATED) : Users who follow Chiara Ferragni have come together to curate all possible video, text and audio interview to showcase Chiara Ferragni's journey, experiences, achievements, advice, opinion in one place to inspire upcoming bloggerss. All content is sourced via different platforms and have been given due credit.

  • What’s it been like watching Instagram grow into this dominant force in the industry over the past decade?

    It has changed drastically, for me for the better because I’ve always been doing what I do on my own social media. Back 10 years ago when I started, actually almost 11 years ago—when I started in 2009, it was mostly, for me, publishing on a blog. So whatever I post now on Instagram—that’s my life and what I wear and what I do—that was, at the time, on my blog and I would update it everyday. And now it has changed so much because social media changed the rules for everybody, because everybody started being obsessed with followers and gaining recognition online and getting great numbers. Before, when I used to have a blog, it was only for people that really wanted to share but so many others couldn’t really understand why I would [write a blog], you know? They couldn’t understand the power behind it. It’s been great because that’s what I’ve always been doing and it’s so great that now people recognize those numbers and people are so trained to these numbers and to what you do and to your specific voice and even the way you talk about things. It’s way more natural than maybe a magazine or a different show and stuff and then people now really, really get [social media]. They really get this new way of communication that before was a little abstract for some.

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  • You get to bring a whole new perspective to the show too, the Instagram side. Instagram is such a huge deal in the world of fashion now. What advice did you give the designers in regards to how they can better work Instagram into their business models?

    They always have to keep social media in mind whatever they do. The clothes you design, the audience you are trying to talk to and stuff, they have to make it very Instagrammable. It’s very important. We talked about it on the show so much, about the colors. There was one of the competitors, Esther—all her collection was always black, and I get it. I like a lot of her things but we were trying to tell her—I was the first one but so many other judges would agree with me that it was very difficult on social media to only show you know black clothes because they don’t stand out so much as much as colorful ones or print ones. So I think it’s very important to, of course, you have your aesthetic and stuff, but you also have to be able to tell a story for the brand. That’s what people buy into so much more. They’re very interested in what’s behind a fashion piece and how you can wear it, but also what the brand stands for. It’s really important to have a certain image and value social media because now its the future of most of the businesses and fashion as well.

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  • How did filming in Tokyo differ from filming in New York?

    The vibes were so different. In New York, we only filmed the last two episodes so we were there for less time. And obviously New York has such a different energy. I love it as well. For the finale, we filmed on this rooftop from, I don’t know, from 8 p.m. or something and we then went back in the studio until like 4 a.m. or something like that. So we were super tired on the rooftop. It was the end of August, so it was supposed to be warm, but it was so freezing cold and we were all wearing very nice dresses because it was the finale, so we were all freezing cold. But the whole experience was absolutely great.

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  • Did you have a favorite moment in Tokyo, a runway show or look from a designer?

    The last episode we shot in Tokyo, it was in this harbor, which was really nice. And we were on the top of a deck and it was so incredible. The other days it had been raining. The weather in Tokyo was pretty miserable most of the time, but that night was perfect because—I don’t know how they could do it if it was raining like the other days, but it was nice. After that, before judging, we went to dinner all together and we had such a good time. We went to this very traditional Japanese restaurant and then we were laughing about it because we were smelling so much because they cooked in front of us. So we were all smelling like food when we got to the studio. but it was one of the greatest memories I have from that trip.

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  • What was it like filming in Japan, traveling with the fellow judges and seeing the sights?

    It was amazing. We had a lot of fun. A lot of the nights we went to dinner together. Heidi and I also filmed at the Robot Restaurant, which was super fun. We saw these guys dressing up as robots and doing all this choreography and stuff. It was nice.Tokyo’s one of my favorite places on Earth, so it was really beautiful to be able to film there. We were there for like 10 days but we filmed for four days, so we also had a lot of extra time to explore the city a little bit more.

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  • How did this experience differ from being a guest judge for one week on Project Runway?

    It was totally different because on Project Runway I was only working for one day back in New York. That was also such a long time ago, and being a judge for Making the Cut was so much better, obviously because I had such a bigger role. It was so nice to be able to film in so many different cities. I couldn’t make it to Paris, so I was there for the episodes in Tokyo and then for the finale in New York. And it was so nice. I think they did it very differently from Project Runway and it’s great because its not only a fashion show. It’s not only about the fashion, but its about traveling as well, and the cities and how you get inspired by those places.

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  • How’d you get involved with Making the Cut? Did Heidi Klum call you up personally?

    No, she didn’t call me personally. I’d met her once only before. While she was doing Project Runway, I was a guest judge for one of the episodes before, back in 2014. But I met with the [Making the Cut] production company and they were telling me about this new competition reality show that they were doing, and Heidi and Tim were involved and they were interested in making me one of the judges. So from there we had a lot of different meetings and then they chose me to be one of the judges. So that was really awesome.

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  • If you could give one piece of advice to young girls looking to pursue a similar career path as you, what would it be?

    Always believe in yourself and don’t let anyone but you decide what’s best on your behalf. Trust the journey throughout ups and downs, and visualize the objective. Work hard and never stop!

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  • Social media also comes with a lot of negativity and comments. How has this affected you during the years? How do you deal with “haters?”

    I’ve had haters since the beginning, not just from Instagram. When I started and I was joined my first catwalks, I was one of the few younger women in the industry, and the fashion world was a really niche and small at the time. I heard so many harsh comments, the most common was things along the lines of “she won’t last more than 6 months”. Now that I use Instagram as my natural way of documenting my everyday, I always have to face hate comments. At the beginning, this worried me and made me feel so bad, but one day I realized that what I am doing is okay and that I am always working to reach my goals. I am always trying to spread positive messages through social media but at the end of the day, I can’t please everyone and this is something that you really have to be aware of. I try as much as I can to always answer in a smart way to haters, and I have learned from their comments to push myself to do always better.

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  • Social media usually gets a lot of criticism when it comes to portraying unrealistic body images and lifestyles. Is this something that you’ve struggled with throughout your career?

    I try to let people see my everyday life, with my make up on and off, when I am on a set or when I spend my free time with my family and friends, so I think I have a more natural and real look. I believe that social media has to become an easier space for people to share real experiences and realistic material, without faking it.

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  • What was it like creating your documentary Unposted? How do you see your story inspire others?

    I have always had this dream about finding a way to get people to understand what my professional path has been and really show them what my job is. I have always felt the need to show people who I really am outside the life that they see through the lens of social media, and how real my life can be with all kinds of ups and downs – just like every human being. I hope that sharing my story will show people that if you really believe and if you really want something, you can work hard and reach it.

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  • How has social media changed since you first came into the scene 10 years ago? How do you see it evolving?

    It has changed completely. When I started my blog, Instagram didn’t even exist. Blogs were beginning to slowly pop up, especially in the USA. The idea of sharing your experiences live and direct wasn’t as big as it is today, and was also very far away from the fashion industry. It was very different from what it is like now. I have to say that the rise of Instagram gave a big boost to my career and business, and is now the social media platform that I use the most.

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  • When starting The Blonde Salad, did you ever imagine the success you’d have? What made you start?

    I have always had a thing about sharing my everyday life. I’ve always thought that taking pictures of my outfits, travels around the world and experiences with friends and family could one day evolve into something bigger and more important. I started looking outside Italy and I discovered bloggers from all over the world, and a Californian girl caught my attention. She was taking pictures of herself and her trips around America, and shared these on platforms like Flickr. This inspired me and I started my own blog. Since the beginning, I had wanted to play with the idea of a “blonde” doing things, and the idea of “The Blonde Salad” came to mind when I was brainstorming with friends. This year marks the 10th anniversary of The Blonde Salad, and I couldn’t be more proud of how much it has evolved. Now, theblondesalad.com is a talent agency which represents digital native talents, and is also an international lifestyle platform with an integrated e-commerce aspect. I started as a blogger, and then my career evolved to influencer, and now I am a Digital Entrepreneur – I could never have imagined to see my life change so fast.

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  • What star or model’s style do you love at the moment? Who are your top style icons?

    My top style icons come from the past. People like Kate Moss and Jane Birkin

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  • . Have you ever been to New Zealand? If not, what do you know about us and our country? We need to bring you here for New Zealand Fashion Week!

    I have unfortunately never been to your country. Thanks to the Lord of the Rings I got to see the amazing landscapes of New Zealand that I would love to experience soon. Maybe I should come for New Zealand Fashion Week?

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  • Of course Lorde is special to us, because she’s a New Zealander and Remix is a New Zealand magazine. Are you a fan? Did you guys hang out?

    She is so nice! Of course I know she is from New Zealand. I have been a fan of her since her first single hit the charts. We were sitting at the same table so we had the chance to talk a lot.

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  • You looked incredible at the Met Ball, dressed in Calvin Klein. How was your first experience at the Met Ball?

    Thank you so much. I loved my Calvin Klein outfit. It was my very first Met Ball and I was pretty excited to be there. I had the chance to meet people I really admire and spend the evening with them.

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  • Your cover of Vogue Spain was a world first. You’re the first blogger to ever cover an issue of Vogue. How did that feel and what was that experience like working with the Vogue team?

    It was such an honour to me. I dreamt about it through my whole childhood. It was an amazing experience to shoot with the Spanish team in Milan. I liked working with them because they were really professional and I immediately felt comfortable with them. It was a blast!

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  • Do you agree with that at all or would you say social media just adds to the blog?

    I believe in both channels equally. They are both very important and unique. They absolutely compliment each other as well

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  • How many run the blog with you? Who is in your team running what has become a business of style inspiration?

    My team is made up of 16 people. Some of them work for the Chiara Ferragni Collection, my shoe line. Other editors are in charge of The Blonde Salad. We have the accounting department and people working with me on my crazy agenda. All together we are the TBS Crew and we have our own Instagram @tbscrew.

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  • What kind of content is most popular? Which of your posts do your readers love the most?

    Besides me, there are four editors creating content for The Blonde Salad. There is a wide range of topics, from lifestyle to shopping sections, from travel to inspirations, from beauty to trends. They are all go very well, but what my readers like the most are the travel articles where they can get inspiration for their future travels! All content is always shared on the official Instagram account @theblondesalad.

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  • At what point did you realise The Blonde Salad was much more than a hobby and in fact something quite enormous? Was it the Teen Vogue story?

    It happened organically, but I remember the turning point. It was when a couture brand contacted me for collaboration, because that was one of my dreams coming true!

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  • What do you think it is about The Blonde Salad that has been so popular and made it so successful? What sets your blog apart?

    I’m flattered about that. I think that the key to our success is the fact that I’ve always worked hard and been surrounded by the hardest working people; talents who support me everyday. I think I am the most determined person on earth and I really believe in what I do.

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  • Where is home for you? What’s a normal day like for you when you’re not travelling or working?

    There are two places that I call home: Milan, Italy and Los Angeles, California. I like to take the best from both places. When I’m in Milan I spend most of the time with my team, The Blonde Salad crew, at our headquarters. I normally have lunch with all of them and have dinner with my family and friends. When in Los Angeles I like to wake up early, check my emails, have breakfast and, when I have some free time, go hiking with my friends or my boyfriend Andrew. I love to have healthy lunches or dinners with my friends out or even in my backyard.

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  • Do you like watching yourself on TV?

    I ’ve only watched one of my episodes so far. I need them to send me the rest. But it’s cute! I’m used to seeing myself in front of the camera. I sometimes think “I could have said that better” or “I could have done that better,” but, I mean, I think everyone does that, right?

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  • So, what are they drawn to?

    A good price, for sure. And color. Esther’s collection was totally black and I was trying to tell her that on social media, people are really drawn to color and print. You don’t have to change your brand completely — maybe just add a little detail of color — but black on social media and e-commerce can look a little boring sometimes

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  • Did you ever feel like the judges made the wrong call in regards to a specific designer?

    We agreed most of the time, but we each approached judging from a different perspective. I was really more focused on what I thought would be sellable, because I see so much of what people are drawn to through my own platform

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  • What about Joseph Altuzarra?

    I was always interested to hear his opinions because he was really able to see things from a brand perspective, but at the same time, he’s a really good designer. And he was also so articulate! I was always like “My god! I wish I had said it that way.” And he’s such a good human as well.

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  • What about Naomi?

    In the beginning, it was a difficult to get friendly because she’s a little bit more on her own — distant, you know? But after the first few episodes, we broke the ice and starting really talking to each other. She finally started acknowledging me more. Then we all went to dinner together and from that moment on, she’s been super friendly. She’s intimidating, though, and not super friendly right away.

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  • How did you get along with the other judges in "Making the cut"?

    I already knew Nicole [Richie] — I met her a few times at events — and Heidi and I are really good friends. She’s a super hardworking woman, but she always makes it fun for everybody and I feel that everybody that works with her loves her so much. She just has the best attitude and is so positive.

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  • What was it about “Making the Cut” that made you say yes?

    I became friends with Heidi back in 2014, when I appeared as a guest judge on Project Runway with Dita Von Teese. I had so much fun recording it and from then on I knew this was something I would want to do again once the right opportunity came along. What I love about “Making the Cut” is that it’s not just about finding the best designer, but looking at the entire brand. That’s something I do myself when it comes to my own image, my collaborations, and the work I do under my own brand name. It’s not only about being creative; it’s also about creating products that really sell and creating an image that people are drawn to. These are things people sometimes take for granted — especially if they don’t work in this industry — but they are just as important as designing.

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  • Have you always wanted to be on TV?

    Yeah, but I’ve never been in a rush. I think it has to be for the right thing. People always wanted me to do reality television or other things that weren’t right for me and I said no. But this one, from the first time they started talking to me about it, felt like the perfect fit. At the time, I didn’t know who any of the other judges were, but the producers always said they wanted to keep it very high profile. It was super nice.

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  • Let’s talk about the show! How did you get involved with “Making the Cut?”

    I was in LA for the Oscars and I met with the production company behind the show. They said it was kind of like Project Runway, but much different — more of a travel show and more about creating a business, rather than just finding a designer. After a few interviews, they decided to make me one of the judges! I’m super happy to be part of it.

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