Badshah Curated

Renowned Indian Rapper

CURATED BY :  


  • Do you have a “Rapper Block” ?

  • Are you very conscious as you become more and more successful to keep this earthiness because that’s who your audience is?

  • You own a Rolls Royce Wraith now. What was your parents’ reaction to it?

  • What is your next desire after owning Rolls-Royce Wraith?

  • What was the idea behind your name ‘Cool Equal’?

  • Where did the name Badshah come from?

  • How do you get all the fresh stock of Balenciaga that comes out?

  • Who is your stylist?

  • How do your parents react to your fashion sense?

  • Why didn’t you sing in the move Gully Boy?

  • When will see a remake from badshah again ?

    'I Am Done with Remakes' For corporate artists it's (a song) is just a product. For us artists, it's our baby... Remakes bahut personal opinion hai. But kai saare remakes ab aise ho rahe hain, mujhe samajh nahin aa raha kya ho raha hai. Kyun kar rahe hain? For me I think, I am done with remakes. Because quality itni kharaab ho gai hai remakes ki.

  • There is debate going on in the music circle about remaking of songs, How you look at this ?

  • If know you are approached to do a remake, will you do it?

  • International rapper you look up to?

  • Who do you mostly listen to while driving ?

  • If you could have any three actors for dinner tonight who would that be?

  • Alia Bhatt in Saturday Saturday or Alia Bhatt in kar gayi chull ?

  • Best & worst thing about being Badshah?

  • One young singer rapper from current generation whom you find promising?

  • Which are your top three movies of 2019?

  • Three songs of yours which has changed your life ?

  • As an actor what would you learn from the Ayushman Khuranna?

  • As an actor what would you learn from the Shahrukh Khan?

  • As an actor what would you learn from the Ranbir Singh?

  • As an actor what would you learn from the Akshay Kumar?

  • As an actor what would you learn from the Ajay Devgn?

  • Top three actors in Bollywood right now?

  • If you were to go on a romantic date with any Bollywood actress who would that be?

  • What one quality do you miss in you that a great musician must have?

  • A musician you just can'y wait to collaborate with?

  • What's your favorite movie album of this year?

  • How do you rate Ranveer Singh as a rapper in gully boy on a scale of 1 to 10?

  • If you have not selected your career as a rapper or a singer then would you became an engineer?

  • Why you want to became politician, if you were not a rapper or singer?

  • Do you think due to your physical absence in the industry, many new rapper got benefited from that?

  • We want to know your first reaction after hearing the name of Guru Randhawa?

  • We want to know your first reaction after hearing the name of Gurdas Maan?

  • We want to know your first reaction about Sharukh Khan?

  • We want to know your first reaction about Badshah?

  • We want to know your first reaction about Salman Khan?

  • We want to know your first reaction about Raftaar?

  • We want to know your first reaction about Raftaar?

  • We want to know your first reaction about Akshay Kumar?

  • We want to know your first reaction about Honey Singh?

  • You are suppose to do good newwz, the character that Daljeet Singh has played, what really happened?

  • If you see the promo now the way daljeet character is looking like & why?

  • What are your views on clean lyrics and music videos? Do you think it is important?

    I might sound cliched here but the culture has changed and is constantly changing. People love what they can relate to. And fortunately or unfortunately the audience that my music caters to is very very diverse. I can make a ‘Saturday Saturday’, I can make a ‘Proper Patola’ and I can even make an absolutely traditional song like Veet Baljit's ‘Reel’. Not everyone loved Proper Patola, not everyone loved Reel. But they all are loved by a lot of people. The point is everyone has their own perspective, their own way of looking at things. I’m just an artist who observes a lot and then puts his observations into music. People who relate to it love it, people who don’t, listen to other artists, simple.

  • Who’s your inspiration within the industry?

    I’m a great great great fan of the music that I end up making at times. Besides that I love the production by Pharell and Timberlake, I love the way Dr. Dre uses his keys, I love Drake's, J Cole's and Raxtar's style of writing. Steel Banglez inspires me to keep getting better. I love Honey Singh's sense of music. There is so much to be inspired from. But be inspired, don’t be influenced.

  • You worked on the song ‘Proper Patola’ and ‘Saturday Saturday’ both of which have been a great success. How you were involved of these two massive hits?

    I wrote and produced Saturday keeping in mind the Delhi Punjabi sector of audience. But the fact that it found a major liking in places like Ludhiana and Amritsar came as a surprise. That’s when I became aware of the drastic cultural changes taking place almost everywhere. Soon the song became a national hit, being played heavily in clubs in Mumbai, Pune and Goa etc. It is an essential Saturday night anthem of the country today, reinstating the fact that music has no language and hence no boundaries. Only a very few people know that I wrote Proper Patola for Garry Sandhu. The title of the song came from my wife when she was teaching me some local London slangs words lol. 'Proper' was one of them, that’s when I came out with the whole concept of Proper Patola and I wrote it while I was on a London tube. It had all that Brit Asian vibe to it. I thought the best guy to sing it would be Garry Sandhu; however things couldn’t be worked out between us two as he was busy with his own stuff. I then decided to sing it myself.Around that time I met Diljit paaji and this track was playing in my car. He was hooked to it instantly and we did it. Needless to say he killed it! Bad tune (that’s another one of the UK slangs, innit?!) hahaha

  • Tell us about your family?Are they supportive about your profession?

    I have a very supportive and loving family. My family consists of my parents, sister and my wife. My father though, in my early days, was not very supportive towards my interest in music but by God's grace, things fell into place and my dreams became a reality. My sister Aparajita, is another support and a true critic; she always tells me honestly as to how my songs are and my wife, Jasmine, is another pillar in my life without whom I could not be where I am.

  • What made you decide to judge for a singing reality show?

    I chose this reality show because i wanted people to be aware about rapping. It's a serious art. Some arts like dancing, standup comedy, rapping are not taken seriously into consideration. So, i want people to take this art seriously. But apart from it, i am here to have lot of fun and have a better connection with the audience. You cannot deny the fact that the reach of Television is very high.

  • What is your advice to those who are struggling to balance between getting a degree and pursuing a passion?

    I think you just have to be very smart about it and don't be foolish. Perseverance is very important because music is very liberating. However, you need to see how it will work out, you also have to feed yourself after all. I was working twice as hard when I was earning to invest in my music career.

  • If you weren’t a musician, what would you be?

    If I weren't a successful musician, I'd have been an IAS officer. Don't be shocked, I have always been a good student. I am a civil engineer, you know!

  • What has been your biggest challenge so far?

    The image that was formed of me. I am an artiste. I have a lot of perspectives that I want to showcase. I am reserved; I don’t speak much. I can’t deal with the attention. But my public image is such that I will never be offered a sad song with, maybe, Arijit Singh (singer). It is not the industry’s fault; my image is such.

  • A controversy erupted when Arijit apologised to Salman on Facebook. He even requested the actor to not delete his song from his upcoming film. Is Bollywood a vulnerable place for established artistes?

    Bollywood is just like any other industry. It is just that people in this industry are constantly in the public eye. Everybody knows what’s happening. I respect Arijit for coming out and speaking his mind. I met him briefly, and he came across as a humble guy. However, I don’t know what the real feud or issue was. Whatever it is, I’m sure Salman bhai, who is known to have a big heart, will get it sorted out.

  • Many believe that the quality of lyrics has gone down nowadays. What is your opinion?

    Opinions are subjective. Everyone has their own taste. The popular public opinion is this [that the quality has deteriorated], but I don’t think it is the case. At the end of the day, we are here to entertain, and people enjoy what we are coming out with. We do our social duties too. For instance, I made a song, ‘Bandook’, which was about karma, and ‘Pinjara’, which was about caste-based killings. I recently wrote a song on female foeticide too. So, it’s about what you choose to listen to.

  • You work on multiple Bollywood music projects. do you get enough time to work on your singles?

    I work on my singles and my own sound simultaneously. I should be able to release my new album next month. At the same time, I like working on Bollywood music. The industry has been kind to me. It gives me the opportunity to have a greater reach, and to inspire other artistes to work hard.

  • You were on the Forbes India Celebrity list. What does it mean to you?

  • You released your debut album “One”. What were the goals behind this album?

  • वह दिन कैसा था जब आपने अपने पिता से कहा था कि आप रैपर बनना चाहते हैं?

  • भारत में एक सफल रैपर होने के अलावा, क्या आपको लगता है कि आपके जीवन में कुछ ऐसे मानक या लक्ष्य हैं जिन्हें आप प्राप्त करना चाहते हैं?

  • पिछले दो सालों में आपकी लोकप्रियता और फैन की दीवानगी बहुत बढ़ गई है। क्या अब प्रतिस्पर्धा बढ़ गई है?

  • Are there any insecurities in Badshah who always have a swag, confidence or an attitude that have influenced the youths of this generation?

  • Were there any inspirations?

    Apart from A.R. Rahman’s music, Eminem’s song ‘Loose yourself’ which says cease the momentum, remains a big influence on my life. I grew up in an age when there was no internet and only popular songs used to come to India. He has been a social commentator and according to him life does not give you second chance and that is my life all about.Shah Rukh Khan’s stardom always inspires me. His sensibilities, way of life and the way he does business, I love him for that.

  • There is still a lack of filter in the content which is rushed in the name of rap. What is your view?

    Digital platforms have given power in the hands of the audience. There will be ten similar looking people in front of you but you have to decide who the original is. Being influenced is just fine but copying will not help you as you will find your audience only when you have your own style.Also, good thing is corporates and the music companies know that the power is in the hands of artists now. They cannot fool the audience anymore. If the song is good, it does not matter if it is released by a music company or not. I have seen people becoming stars without any help from big companies.

  • Be it Sambhar in Rajasthan or O2 Arena in London, your visuals in songs are equally eye-catching. What is the secret?

    You do not repeat your sounds, why repeat your visuals ? Every rap song does not need to have dancing in the club, you can also dance on the wing of an aeroplane if you have money, which I had. It has to be different, it has to look grand. We are officially the only one who have shot in the O2 world arena. I am Badshah, I do whatever I want.

  • What is the rule to success?

    When it comes to rules of success, I think being honest with one’s work, respecting one’s parents and staying healthy and having a streak of madness is needed to be successful.

  • What are your views on clean lyrics and music videos? Do you think it is important?

    I might sound clichéd here but the culture has changed and is constantly changing. People love what they can relate to. And fortunately or unfortunately the audience that my music caters to is very very diverse. I can make a ‘Saturday Saturday’, I can make a ‘Proper Patola’ and I can even make an absolutely traditional song like Veet Baljit's ‘Reel’. Not everyone loved Proper Patola, not everyone loved Reel. But they all are loved by a lot of people. The point is everyone has their own perspective, their own way of looking at things. I’m just an artist who observes a lot and then puts his observations into music. People who relate to it love it, people who don’t, listen to other artists, simple.

  • Your fan base is generally the younger audience. Is it easy to target your music towards them?

    Not at all. Also you can never take your audience for granted. Today’s audience is really intelligent and that’s what I love about it. It gives me an opportunity to experiment with my work. At the same time today’s audience has have so many options but no time. It won’t give you a lot of chances. They’ve got the internet, they’ll find what they’re looking for and they’ll find the best one at it.

  • Tell us how did you get involved in music? Have you always had a passion?

    I was always passionate about music, and when I say always I mean always. Although never really thought of pursuing music professionally, it just happened. I make music purely for the love of it.

  • How do you see the interpretation of rap in the cultural milieu of current Punjab?

    My lyrical content is all about entertainment. I think the culture of Punjab has changed a lot. A few years back Punjab was going through a very difficult phase but now the youth has woken up and have realised the potential of their State. Punjab has given amazing sportspersons, stars and it is an important state financially. Punjabi songs set standards and benchmarks.

  • Bollywood, of late, has also started recognising the rappers by giving them full-fledged songs having a unique hook line. How do you see the trend?

    I think it is a welcome change and I think rap is here to stay for long time as I am seeing young kids growing up aspiring to become rapper rather than a singer, an astonishing thing. I think it is good for the genre and for those struggling. I want audience to get hooked to it. It just has to be easy and should not make you think. It should just make you enjoy. We are not preachers or teachers; we are entertainers. There is no conscience involved apart from the fact that I am here to entertain you.

  • When did you start writing/rapping/singing?

    Music has been my passion since childhood. When I was n eighth grade, I started writing and with time better exposure to different genres of music helped a lot in my learning process. I think, my becoming a rapper/song-writer was just a natural progression. It had to happen.

  • What about those meaningful lyrics which Bollywood was famous for?

    People do it and I do not do it. If I also start doing that, what will be the difference between me and them? Kalyanji Anandji had a song ‘Aap jaisa koi meri zindagi mein aaye to baat ban jaye...’ Are lyrics saying something? No. It is all subjective and there is audience to decide what to listen. An artist is the representation of the times he is living in and so are my lyrics. There is more fun in teasing rather than being crass. A lot of my songs are being listened by families, so I keep them clean. I want maximum target group.