Arriana Huffington Curated

Co-founder of The Huffington Post

CURATED BY :  

This profile has been added by users(CURATED) : Users who follow Arriana Huffington have come together to curate all possible video, text and audio interview to showcase Arriana Huffington's journey, experiences, achievements, advice, opinion in one place to inspire upcoming bloggerss. All content is sourced via different platforms and have been given due credit.

  • What’s the next biggest challenge/opportunity you are looking forward to tackling with Huffington Post?

    This is an incredible moment at HuffPost, and we’re thrilled by all the opportunities and challenges coming up. We have more than 100,000 bloggers, and 65 percent of our audience now comes from mobile. With 15 global editions, we’re poised to reach more people around the world than ever before and start conversations on the topics people care about most. And we’re especially excited by all the opportunities around video. As the universe of platforms where people engage with video expands exponentially, The Huffington Post is making changes that will position us to be the dominant global media company in video in this ever-changing media environment. And we’re doing this while doubling down on our core editorial pillars of news and politics, What’s Working and wellness.

    View Source:

  • What was your vision for Huffington Post when you first started it?

    Bringing together people from different worlds and facilitating interesting conversations has always been part of my Greek DNA. So from the beginning, the whole point of The Huffington Post was to take the sort of conversations found at water coolers and around dinner tables – about politics and art and books and food and sex – and open them up and bring them online.

    View Source:

  • What was the deciding insight you have had in your life that motivates you to practice meditation?

    Although I’ve known its benefits since my teens, finding time for meditation was always a challenge because I was under the impression that I had to “do” meditation. And I didn’t have time for another burdensome thing to “do.” Fortunately, a friend pointed out one day that we don’t “do” meditation; meditation “does” us. That opened the door for me. The only thing to “do” in meditation is nothing. Even writing that I don’t have to “do” one more thing makes me relax.

    View Source:

  • If you could only recommend 3 books to someone who is just about to enter adulthood, what would they be?

    1) Reclaiming Conversation by Sherry Turkle Sherry Turkle is one of our pre-eminent thinkers on the ways technology impacts our lives. From her work at MIT to books like Alone Together and now Reclaiming Conversation, she’s showing us how to make more meaningful human connections and how to embrace – not fear – the risks and rewards of true companionship and intimacy. 2) Dangerously Sleepy: Overworked Americans and the Cult of Manly Wakefulness by Alan Derickson Through the nineteenth century, as was the case with factories, machines, and workers, sleep became just another commodity to be exploited as much as possible. Indeed, sleep became not just devalued but actively scorned. After all, every hour spent sleeping was another hour spent not working— therefore another wasted hour. To support this new way of working and compel workers to go along with it, going without sleep was cast as an act of masculinity, a sign of strength— what Alan Derickson in Dangerously Sleepy calls “heroic wakefulness” and “manly stamina.” Sleep became a sign of “unmanly weakness,” and this macho notion of sleep persists to this day— a way of measuring masculinity without a ruler. 3) I love books that use the power of stories to make us see the world in a different way. In the 1840s, Benjamin Disraeli, still a long way from being prime minister, wanted to wake people up to the plight of the British working class – and move them to act. The alarm he sounded wasn’t delivered in a speech, a pamphlet, or an article — but in a novel, Sybil, published in 1845. It had the desired effect – raising awareness, provoking outrage, and leading to the passage of several fundamental social reforms. Disraeli knew that one of the most effective ways to touch people is through narrative – putting flesh and blood on raw facts and data.

    View Source:

  • What is your personal mission in life? How do you hope to be remembered in 100 years?

    My personal mission is to help as many people as possible transform their lives by discovering – or rediscovering — the miraculous benefits of sleep. No matter who we are, we share a common need for sleep. Though this need has been a constant throughout human history, our relationship to sleep, and our understanding of its vital benefits has gone through dramatic ups and downs. And right now that relationship is in crisis. At the same time, we’re living in a golden age of sleep science—revealing all the ways in which sleep and dreams play a vital role in our decision making, emotional intelligence, cognitive function, and creativity. And I’m profoundly uninterested in my legacy, and much more interested in any impact I can have right now.

    View Source:

  • What is the number 1 idea, that has allowed you to succeed in an industry where so many have failed?

    Speaking of success and failure, I’d say that my attitude toward failure has helped me – because I’ve failed at many things. My mother used to tell me, “failure is not the opposite of success, it’s a stepping stone to success.” So at some point, I learned not to dread failure. I strongly believe that we are not put on this earth just to accumulate victories and trophies and avoid failures; but rather to be whittled and sandpapered down until what’s left is who we truly are. That’s something that applies to anyone in any industry.

    View Source:

  • What are the top 3 tips you wish you had while growing up?

    1.I wish I’d known much sooner that sleep is a non-negotiable human need. 2.I wish I’d appreciated just how powerful it can be to introduce just five minutes of meditation to your day. Eventually, you can build up to fifteen or twenty minutes a day (or more), but even just a few minutes will open the door to creating a new habit— and all the many proven benefits it brings. 3. I wish I had avoided falling victim to the collective delusion that burning out is the necessary price for accomplishment and success. Recent scientific findings make it clear that this couldn’t be less true. Not only is there no tradeoff between living a well-rounded life and high performance, performance is actually improved when we make sleep and renewal a priority.

    View Source:

  • How about in the non-profits and civil society — who stands out as a leader?

    There are many. I think what TreeHugger is doing is fantastic, I think what the Apollo Alliance is doing is great. NRDC has also always been a champion of these causes and it continues to be at the forefront. There really are an incredible amount of fantastic groups working in this area. The question is translating those issues, both into public policy and into personal behavior—whether it's switching to a hybrid car, or changing your light bulbs or whatever else.

    View Source:

  • Can you give an example of someone who is, in your opinion, being accountable and walking his or her talk?

    There are many great environmental leaders, but unfortunately most of them are out of office. Al Gore and Bobby Kennedy for example are both passionate and clear, and they are up to date on the facts and the latest science. But the question is who among those running in 2008 is going to be at the forefront of this issue? Maybe Al Gore himself will run.

    View Source:

  • How can we become fearless about the climate change challenges that lie ahead?

    If you remember FDR, he said, "the only thing to fear is fear itself." At the time, our country was going through terrible times. And later on, as president, he had to deal with the Depression; he had to deal with the Second World War. The presence of really big challenges does not need to provoke fear, it needs to provoke a determination to act. If you look at 9/11, you could see the best aspects of this country coming forward. It was a day filled with fear, but at the same time it was a day filled with fearlessness. People rose to the occasion, and it brought the best out in people.

    View Source:

  • Can you tell us a little about this your latest book, On Becoming Fearless in Love, Work, and Life, challenges this approach ?

    I really don't think that fear is the way to bring about fundamental cultural change, and I think we have had so much fear-mongering leadership during the whole Bush-administration years. I think the victory of the Democrats in 2006 was, partly at least, due to the public not buying in to the fear mongering.

    View Source:

  • How do we create an environmental agenda that would support people on a low income?

    I think that is very important for the political agenda, because it moves away from this idea that environmentalism is supposedly an elitist issue, and shows that these issues are in our neighbourhoods. We need to show, for example, how pollution affects the incredible cost of healthcare. I think this is a great way to frame environmentalism, and it is of huge importance to political leaders.

    View Source:

  • How do you think we can bring environmental issues back into the debate in US politics?

    First of all, I think a lot of oxygen will be freed up once something is done about the catastrophe in Iraq. I think that this has been one of the problems. We are basically facing such a lack of leadership in Iraq. A lot of people who actually normally care passionately about the environment, have been using as much of their energy as possible fighting that battle, so not enough attention has been paid to environmental issues. Although, of course, there has been an enormous amount of good being done by Al Gore and An Inconvenient Truth.

    View Source:

  • What do you think about the state of independent online media today, in particular in relation to what it has done for politics?

    I think it is incredibly significant. We are expanding right now, and have just hired a political editor from Newsweek Magazine, Melinda Henneberger who used to be with the New York Times for ten years, and she is building a team that will take on political coverage, including the 2008 elections. It will stage online debates between presidential candidates, both in the primaries and in the general, and make sure that we are a major player, as the online community increasingly will be, in the coverage of the 2008 presidential race.

    View Source:

  • Did you have any sense when you were envisioning the Huffington Post that it would have the kind of impact that it has had?

    I think it was really the perfect storm. It was a combination of us coming out with the first collective blog of multiple voices, and of news being constantly updated. We now have over 700 contributors. I think the timing was also important — there is something big about being the first to do something, and we did this at a time when there was growing interest in getting news online.

    View Source:

  • How successful was the Detroit Project, and where does it stand today?

    It was amazingly successful. We spent under $100,000 to produce ads and we got them played on major networks because they were edgy, and because they showed the links between dependence on foreign oil and terrorism. It showed how much can be done by citizen activists taking matters into their own hands. What is interesting is that at the time we were attacked in a major way by rightwing radio, and many others, and yet now this issue cuts across party lines. There are now a lot of people on the right who are supporting our position.

    View Source:

  • Do you think we are any closer to achieving the need for energy independence now than when you penned those words in your campaign for governor of California?

    Unfortunately not. The reality is that our dependence on foreign oil has increased. Despite a lot of lofty rhetoric from the White House, and despite lots of private commitment to responsible energy use, we are more dependent on foreign oil than we were before and no serious steps are being taken to reduce that dependence. One of the easiest things to do would be to improve CAFE standards so that we wouldn't have the major problems we have now with SUVs being able to bypass the mileage regulations that apply to other cars. Right now it's clear that it has to be the consumer. I live in Los Angeles and I bought my first Toyota hybrid car in 2001, and my children were making fun of me because they looked like golf carts with a hood, now they have improved and you see them everywhere. When I first started driving mine it was considered pioneering, and now they are all over the place. That is something that was driven by consumers, especially after the rise in gas prices. Peer pressure was also important, and it helped that you had celebrities using their arrivals at the Oscars, and other such events, to promote these cars and to help others make the right consumer choice.

    View Source:

  • What advice do you have for those in the workplace in terms of burnout prevention, work/life integration and workplace wellness?

    The way the new changes are going to spread faster is by recognizing that they're not warm and fuzzy and nice to have, but they are directly connected to business metrics and to the bottom line.

    View Source:

  • If some young woman were to ask you what is your secret to success, what would you say to her?

    I would say, what I tell my two millennial daughters. When they prioritize their well-being, they will be more creative, more productive and more effective in whatever career path they choose. They also will realize that success is not just defined by career but by living a full life outside work and nurturing your body, mind and soul.

    View Source:

  • What do you envision the typical workplace will look like in 2030?

    It's going to be so different from where we are now that we're going to look back in 2030 at where we are today in the same way we look at television ads for cigarettes in the 1960s. When we read about the corporate hustle culture and wearing burnout like a badge of honor, we will see how important it was that we made all these changes that we're making right now which I hope will be widespread in 2030. And what is inevitable is that we're going to see better decisions from leaders, better and sustainable results and happier lives. What is absolutely critical at this moment is a reduction in the mental health crisis and chronic diseases because these are symptoms of the burnout culture we're living in.

    View Source:

  • What do you say to the skeptic who says, "I don't have time to soak in a bath or meditate; I'm too busy; my work is too consuming?"

    This is a big pattern of the times we live in because of time famine, feeling breathless, living our lives perpetually feeling we're running out of time. This is a function of living from fight or flight. When we're fully recharged and have moved to our parasympathetic nervous system away, from the fight or flight part of our nervous system, we actually recognize that when we prioritize and are clear about what matters, we have all the time we need. But when you're running on empty, everything seems like a mountain.

    View Source:

  • How do you personally practice self-care?

    The most important thing for me is how I start and end my day. These are also principles we bring to our offerings to corporations that are included in our behavior change app. The way we describe it is at the end of the day, you pick a time—whatever time that is—that you declare the end of your working day because the truth is, there is no end to the workday. So we need to arbitrarily declare the end of the day, so we can fully recharge and return to work. I mark this transition by having a hot bath that I prolong if I've had a stressful day, like a ritual to wash the day away. But before I take my bath, I mark the end of the day by turning off my phone and recharging it outside my room. As you know, we have created a little phone bed that I have outside my bedroom. I put my phone under the blanket, tuck it in and say good night. Then when I'm in bed, I never look at screens. I have a lot of books by my bed—poetry, novels, philosophy and things that have nothing to do with work.

    View Source:

  • From your own perspective, could you describe what "Thrive Time" is?

    "Thrive Time" is one of our cultural values, based on the clarification that we're not a 9 to 5 workplace. We don't believe that any high-growth, ambitious company, as we are, can be 9 to 5. But we believe if somebody has worked extended hours over the weekend or pulled an all-nighter to ship a product, it's important to take Thrive Time immediately afterwards to fully recharge before returning to work. The data shows when people go to work before they fully recharge and their immune system is suppressed, they are more likely to get sick and make bad decisions. They're not as creative or productive, not as empathetic, not as good colleagues and so forth. It's like an athlete taking a break after a big game.

    View Source:

  • Can you name just some of the ways you're implementing ideas on a daily basis with employees at Thrive Global?

    As you see, we have a wellness room with a "nap pod" because we want everyone who works here to get enough sleep. But if they don't for whatever reason—if they're up at night with a sick child, for example—we highly recommend they have a 20-minute nap because that's the fastest way to recharge. And then we have once-a-week chair massages so people can relax and unwind, and we serve occasional nutritious lunches and healthy snacks at all times. Our conference rooms are named after philosophers whose work we integrate into our own work like Marcus Aurelius or Lao Tzu or Rikyu, the inventor of the tea ceremony, which is another example of bringing recharging into your day. And then we have a micro-step wall that has a few hundred of our seven hundred Microsteps, which we call "too small to fail steps," broken down in daily, tiny incremental steps that build up to behavior change.

    View Source:

  • Can you speak about how research supports your mission on sleep revolution?

    he research is unequivocal that sleep and time to recharge along with good nutrition and movement improve both our cognitive and physical performance. Of course, we see that with athletes. You wouldn't have Kobe Bryant, Tom Brady or Simone Biles forego sleep, eat junk and then show up to perform or play a big game. It's the same for all of us in any area of life. That's why at Thrive we have a lot of interviews from elite athletes like Andre Iguodala, Kevin Durant and the 49ers who recognize how important it is to move what they've learned in the sports world to the rest of the world.

    View Source:

  • Describe some of the ideas you're implementing at Thrive Global.

    Thrive Global is redefining the wellness category. We recognize that in order to achieve behavior change, we need both mind shifts and Microsteps. The first mind shift is to end the collective delusion that in order to succeed, you have to burn out. That collective delusion is at the heart of the hustle culture and emphasis on burning out as a badge of honor to the point of emotional bankruptcy. The habit of overextending yourself has diminishing returns. So what we show is that it doesn't actually improve your performance; it's damaging to your performance. That's a central part of the mind shift. And then on the Microstep front, we help people to go from knowing what to do, to doing it by giving them small, incremental daily steps.

    View Source:

  • Do you feel that your voice—added to the voices of scientists—begins a revolution?

    Right now there is this moment in our culture of greater awareness around sleep, greater historical knowledge of why we began to devalue sleep and a greater understanding of the dangers of being overly connected to technology. So the revolution is already happening. What I'm hoping to do is accelerate it.

    View Source:

  • Talk about the day you hit your head. What was your life like then?

    I was two years into building The Huffington Post, and I had the delusion every start-up entrepreneur has: that I had to handle everything. Also I had two teenage daughters. One was dealing with anorexia, and I was going with the other on a college tour. I had agreed that there would be no BlackBerrys on the trip; my daughter said, “Mom, you're going to be fully here with me.” So I was fully there during the day—although not really, because I was so exhausted. Then she would go to sleep in whatever hotel we were in, and I would start working. I had booked myself to do a television show the morning I got home to L.A.—which, in hindsight, was insane. But I did that show and came back. I sat at my desk. I felt cold. I went to get a sweater, and I collapsed. On the way down, I hit my head on the corner of my desk. I broke my cheekbone. I'm lucky I didn't lose an eye. And the doctors didn't know what the problem was. For a couple of weeks I went from echocardiogram to CT scan to every test you can imagine to establish what had happened, only to be told, basically, that I had modern civilization's disease: burnout. There was no medical solution; I had to change the way I lived. That was the beginning of my journey. It wasn't an instant transformation. It was getting 30 minutes more sleep a night; it was saying no more often. It took some time, but then I reached the point where rest became a magnet. I don't like my life when I haven't recharged, and I love it when I have. If I have an early morning, it's now easier to say no to dinner the night before. We all have a lot more discretionary time than we think. You know, you don't have to watch House of Cards. These things are optional.

    View Source:

  • What do you think is the first step to taking back control of your life?

    You have to acknowledge that something is missing. After I gave a speech in San Francisco, a young woman came up to me and said, "I don't remember the last time I wasn't tired." So many of us aren't in touch with the feeling of waking up and being fully present in our lives.

    View Source:

  • What do we lose when we lose out on sleep?

    It starts with the brain. We become cognitively impaired. The data show that if you've been up for 17 to 19 hours—which is pretty normal for a lot of us; it certainly used to be for me—you have the cognitive impairment equivalent of a 0.05 percent blood alcohol level. That's just under being legally drunk, and the impairment increases the longer you're awake. Creativity and performance are affected by sleep deprivation, too. No wonder Charlie Rose is such a fan of naps. In the book, I quote him saying that if he could prep for an interview for another half hour or taking a nap, he'd take a nap. I so identify with that.

    View Source:

  • How do you think the world would change if everyone, from students to world leaders, started prioritizing rest and sleep deprivation became a thing of the past?

    The world would be better in every way, because we’d be taking full advantage of sleep’s miraculous benefits. We’d improve our decision making, emotional intelligence, cognitive function, and creativity. So it’s my hope that everyone will make sleep a priority, and in doing so discover its transformative power just as I have. Now, instead of waking up to the sense that I have to trudge through activities, I wake up feeling joyful about the day’s possibilities. And I’m also better able to recognize red flags and rebound from setbacks. It’s like being dialed into a different channel that has less static.

    View Source:

  • What small change do you think offers the most benefit, for the average person simply trying to be healthy and find balance?

    One small change I swear by is this: Don’t charge your phone next to your bed. Even better: gently escort all devices completely out of your bedroom.

    View Source:

  • What would you say are the most compelling reasons to start prioritizing sleep early on?

    Our cultural assumption that overwork and burnout are the price we must pay in order to succeed is at the heart of our sleep crisis. Indeed, in much of our culture, especially in the workplace, going without sleep is considered a badge of honor. Not surprisingly, this has a real effect on young people just starting out, trying to build successful lives. At the same time, in all my conversations with millennials and young people, I’ve seen a tremendous hunger for change that leaves me incredibly optimistic about their ability to change our collective attitude toward sleep for the better. One of the most compelling reason to prioritize sleep early on is for the performance-enhancing benefits. Perhaps those who equate sleep with laziness or lack of dedication can be convinced of the benefits of sleep by looking at what’s going on in a world that is the ultimate in pragmatism, where performance and winning are everything: sports. To professional athletes, sleep is not about spirituality, work- life balance, or even health and well-being; it’s all about performance. It’s about what works, about using every available tool to increase the chances of winning.

    View Source:

  • Do you think the greatest impacts for society will come from individual efforts, or does sleep need to be tackled in earnest by businesses and thought leaders to see a significant cultural change?

    Both are extremely important, and the good news is there’s a tremendous amount of momentum behind both individual and institutional efforts. And often one leads to another. We have a growing number of leaders in every field realizing that well-rested employees are better employees. In sports, in schools, in medicine, and in the workplace, sleep is finally beginning to claw its way back to the place of respect and reverence it deserves. But that has to start with changing how we think about sleep – and no longer incentivizing sleep deprivation by equating it with dedication and success. And that change alone will transform our culture.

    View Source:

  • What’s your best advice for business owners and managers on how to encourage teams to be healthier, and for their own health?

    Today, so many of us fall into the trap of sacrificing sleep in the name of productivity. But, ironically, our loss of sleep, despite the extra hours we put in at work, collectively adds up to more than eleven days of lost productivity per year per worker, or about $2,280. This results in a total annual cost of sleep deprivation to the US economy of more than $63 billion, in the form of absenteeism and presenteeism (when employees are present at work physically but not really mentally focused). So my advice to business owners and managers is to lead the way to redefining what we value, and changing workplace culture so that working till all hours and walking around exhausted become stigmatized instead of lauded.

    View Source:

  • What other lifestyle changes have helped you reduce stress, stay healthy and maintain productivity without burning out?

    Sleep-wise, developing a bedtime ritual has been one of the most beneficial changes I’ve made. I treat my transition to sleep as a sacrosanct ritual. Before bed, I take a hot bath with epsom salts and a candle flickering nearby—a bath that I prolong if I’m feeling anxious or worried about something. I don’t sleep in my workout clothes as I used to (think of the mixed message that sends to our brains) but have pajamas, nightdresses, even T-shirts dedicated to sleep. Sometimes I have a cup of chamomile or lavender tea if I want something warm and comforting before going to bed. And I have a specific time at night when I regularly turn off my devices — and gently escort them out of my bedroom.

    View Source:

  • In your research on sleep for your book "The Sleep Revolution", what’s one of the most surprising things you discovered?

    A lot of people in our culture— especially hard-charging men— like to think they don’t need much sleep and even brag about it. It usually goes something like this: “Sure, other people need a full night’s sleep in order to function and be healthy and alert. But I’m different.” One of the most surprising things I discovered, however, is that less than 1 percent of the population actually qualifies as “short sleepers”—those rare few able to get by on little sleep without experiencing negative consequences. Though many people would like to believe they can train themselves to gain admission to the short-sleeping 1 percent, the trait is actually the result of a genetic mutation. You either have it or you don’t.

    View Source:

  • What do you think is one of the main catalysts making people more receptive to learning about sleep and wellness ?

    The science. In the last four decades, science has validated much of the ancient wisdom about the importance of sleep. We’ve made incredible discoveries about all the things going on in our brains and our bodies while we’re sleeping, and these findings have fueled a sleep renaissance, in which the power of sleep to profoundly affect virtually every aspect of our lives is beginning to be recognized.

    View Source:

  • Can you tell us about what inspired you to attempt revolutionizing rest through your new book "The Sleep Revolution", and what that means?

    It started with my own painful wakeup call. On the morning of April 6, 2007, I was lying on the floor of my home office in a pool of blood. On my way down, my head had hit the corner of my desk, cutting my eye and breaking my cheekbone. I had collapsed from exhaustion and lack of sleep. In the wake of my collapse, I found myself going from doctor to doctor, from brain MRI to CAT scan to echocardiogram, to find out if there was any underlying medical problem beyond exhaustion. There wasn’t, but doctors’ waiting rooms, it turns out, were good places for me to ask myself a lot of questions about the kind of life I was living. I wrote about my wakeup call in my last book, Thrive, and as I went around the world talking about the book I found that the subject people wanted to discuss most—by far—was sleep: how difficult it is to get enough, how there are simply not enough hours in the day, how tough it is to wind down, how hard it is to fall asleep and stay asleep, even when we set aside enough time. And since my own transformation into a sleep evangelist, everywhere I go, someone will pull me aside and, often in hushed and conspiratorial tones, confess, “I’m just not getting enough sleep. I’m exhausted all the time.” Or, as one young woman told me after a talk in San Francisco, “I don’t remember the last time I wasn’t tired.” By the end of an evening, no matter where I am in the world or what the theme of the event is, I’ll have had that same conversation with any number of people in the room. And what everyone wants to know is, “What should I do to get more and better sleep?” So I decided I wanted to take a fuller look at the subject because it’s clear that if we’re going to truly thrive, we must begin with sleep. It’s the gateway through which a life of well-being must travel. The way I start my day is also, of course, hugely important in determining what follows. And a big part of my morning ritual is about what I don’t do: when I wake up, I don’t start the day by looking at my smartphone. Instead, once I’m awake, I take a minute to breathe deeply, be grateful, and set my intention for the day. Then I do 20 to 30 minutes of meditation and 30 minutes on my stationary bike, on days when I’m home. I also practice yoga most mornings.

    View Source:

  • How else can lack of sleep affect an individual’s performance?

    As well as the cognitive impact, there is an impact when it comes to empathy and creativity. If you’re managing a team, you’re going to be less empathetic and creative. It’s absolutely crucial to recognize the importance of the connection with sleep and recharging throughout the day, like the little breaks to recharge during the day. Even if somebody didn’t care about anything else in their lives—their health, happiness, and families—their performance is affected by how they take care of themselves. We see that with founders. We have a lot of founder stories where they buy into the founder myth that you need to be always on, and it’s affecting your performance. I wrote an open letter to Elon Musk who seems to think that he has to make every decision and be up at all times of the night Tweeting things that turned out to lead to SEC investigations and big huge distractions.`

    View Source:

  • How does modern work help people feel fulfilled or inhibit people’s jobs?

    Ever since the first industrial revolution, we started making the mistake of treating human beings like machines. The goal of a machine is to minimize downtime. Same with software. For some reason we bought into the delusion that it is also the goal for human beings. As a result, we now have this epidemic of burnout and stress, which the World Health Organization acknowledged as a real workplace syndrome that has a huge impact both on our mental health and our performance. All that has been compounded by a growing addiction to our phones. There is no end to our working day. Even when we end our working day, we’re addicted to other things like social media or games or simply checking our inbox and our texts at all times. That has created this real epidemic with huge impact on our health.

    View Source:

  • If you could tell your 18-year-old self one thing, what would it be?

    I wish I could go back and tell myself: “Arianna, your performance will actually improve if you can commit to not only working hard, but also unplugging, recharging and renewing yourself.” And then I’d introduce my 18-year-old self to a quotation by the writer Brian Andreas: “Everything changed the day she figured out there was exactly enough time for the important things in her life.”

    View Source:

  • Best piece of advice you've been given?

    “Don’t miss the moment.” This was one of my mother’s favorite sayings, and it embodied the philosophy of her life.

    View Source:

  • Do you think there’s a tech bubble?

    I don’t, but that doesn’t mean all unicorns are created equal. Some will live up to their promise and some will not, but that’s different from a tech bubble. We’re not even approaching the warning signs that defined the real estate and dotcom bubbles, like people going into crazy debt. And the price/earnings ratios of today’s tech stocks are around 20 -- well below the stratospheric heights of the dotcom days.

    View Source:

  • What are you reading right now?

    Hanya Yanagihara’s A Little Life, which comes highly recommended by my older daughter Christina.

    View Source:

  • What’s the most important company we’ve never heard of?

    Thorn’s Defenders Circle, cofounded by Ashton Kutcher, which uses the latest and most sophisticated tech tools in the service of protecting children from abuse and exploitation.

    View Source:

  • If you could be pitched to by one person, who would it be?

    I’d love to be pitched by someone who has a story to tell about how sleep has improved their life. Because these stories are out there, and there’s nothing like people sharing their own experiences and wakeup calls to help put a spotlight on sleep’s importance. As I’ve gone around the world, I’ve found that the subject people wanted to discuss most -- by far -- is sleep: how difficult it is to get enough, how there are simply not enough hours in the day, how hard it is to fall asleep and stay asleep, even when we set aside enough time. And since my own transformation into a sleep evangelist, everywhere I go, someone will pull me aside and, often in hushed and conspiratorial tones, confess, “I’m just not getting enough sleep. I’m exhausted all the time.” Or, as one young woman told me after a talk in San Francisco, “I don’t remember the last time I wasn’t tired.”

    View Source:

  • How many hours do you sleep?

    95% of the time I get eight hours of sleep a night. Once I started giving sleep the respect it deserves, my life improved in pretty much every way. Now, instead of waking up to the sense that I have to trudge through activities, I wake up feeling joyful about the day’s possibilities. And I’m also better able to recognize red flags and rebound from setbacks. It’s like being dialed into a different channel that has less static.

    View Source:

  • What about your job most excites you?

    At HuffPost, we have more than 800 journalists, editors and engineers. And the most exciting part of my job is getting to work with them every day -- sharing ideas, solving problems, coming up with new ways to fulfill our mission of informing, inspiring, entertaining and empowering audiences around the world. If you’d told be back when we founded HuffPost in 2005 that we’d be in 15 countries, with 100,000 bloggers, I wouldn’t have believed it.

    View Source: