Anurag Kashyap Curated

Indian Film Director

CURATED BY :      +44 others


  • Will we ever get to see you direct an epic large scale film like Baahubali?

  • How many pairs of shoes do you have? Do you buy shoes for its comfort or the jazzy look? 

  • Will you ever write and direct a film that will fit a ‘U’ certificate?

  • What is the reason of putting such distinctive soundtracks in your films?

  • How do you manage to engage in a number of stimuli at a time while on set?

  • If there’s one thing you could change about Gangs of Wasseypur or Bombay Velvet, What would it be?

  • What irks you so much about Mumbai that you choose to go abroad while writing?

  • Which genre in cinema do you like and dislike?

  • If you could make only one more film, what would it be about?

  • How did you got into movies?

  • After coming to Mumbai what kind of jobs did you do? 

  • How did you make money initially after coming to Mumbai?

  • When did you get your first break into movies?

  • How do you finish writing a film in three days?

  • What is that one thing that you would like to teach people?

  • How do you mange to write a movie script so fast?

  • When did you decide to work independently?

  • From where does the violence come into your movie?

  • Which was the most challenging movie you made?

  • What are the criteria for people to get into your films? 

  • What is your advice for people to help them be on the right track?

  • What is the background of the movie 'Ugly'?

  • What was your purpose behind the characterization of police in the film?

  • How has been your life till now ?

  • how did you feel when you were going through depression ?

  • How has your professional life affect your personal life ?

  • How are you as a person ?

  • Are you expressive in relationship ?

  • How an outsider boy broke into bollywood ?

  • What was the most difficult choice you have ever faced in your life ?

  • What have you learnt in while working on Satya for three years?

  • What are your views on political parties?

  • Why do you think about some of your film failures?

  • What are your views on the label "Showrunner" as it is new to the Indian Space?

  • How did you manage to have co-work with another director for "Sacred Games"?

  • What is the difference between directing a movie for a theatre and directing a series for an application?

  • Is there any difference between being anxious before the Friday-release of a film and a series releasing on an application?

  • What is an advantage to release something on an application?

  • How are you managing the self-isolation going on during the pandemic

  • What according to you would self-isolation be in the pre-internet era?

  • What would you recommend for emerging filmmakers to do during this pandemic?

  • What are your recommendations for others during self-isolation?

  • What according to you is a great education form?

  • What film best describes the pandemic situation according to you?

  • Are you ever planning to do a big masala film?

  • How much focus do you put in the songs of your movie?

  • Are you a multi-tasker?

  • If there's one thing you can change, both in GOW and Bombay Velvet, what would it be?

  • Why do you go abroad for writing a script?

  • Which is your favorite genre and which genre is that you hate?

  • Are you a forgiving person?

  • If you could make only one more film, what would be about?

  • What prompted you to make Choked: Paisa Bolta Hai?

    The script. I’d bought this script from the Script Bazar in 2015. It was about a married couple. One day the wife gets some money in the sink. I liked the idea. But there was something missing. The film didn’t seem relevant. Later, we rewrote the film and linked it with demonetisation. Then it became relevant.

  • What's your take on releasing films on OTT Platform?

    What to do? All theatres are shut. The producers are under pressure. One has to adapt to the changing times. There are about 100-150 people working for a film. If the film doesn’t release everyone is affected. Kuch log honge jinki financial taakat itni hai ki film ko hold kar sakte hian. Not everyone can do that. Some fear that their film will get lost in the rush. Because when the theatres reopen, there will be a rush to release the films. The big banners and the big budget films will get priority.

  • Will the coronavirus scare make filmmaking difficult?

    Filmmaking is teamwork with a lot of people – actors, assistant directors, cameramen etc. How do we make a film in solitude? And even if we do, how will we earn the revenue? Difficulties will be there. But we will have to deal with them in accordance to the situation.

  • Given the popularity of social media, anyone and everyone becomes a film critic. Is it annoying?

    I don’t worry about it. Because once a film is released, everyone has the right to talk about it. Some feel offended, some excited. Each person is right in his or her own way.

  • From Black Friday to Choked… how have you changed as a person and as a filmmaker?

    Main sahaj (natural) ho gaya hoon. That’s seen in my work. My films have become less dark. (Smiles) There’s humour, warmth… I guess it comes with age. I’ve started watching films of other filmmakers. I worked closely with Nihit Bhave (scriptwriter), while making Choked. He was with us during the shooting, the editing and post production. I began to rely on him for a perspective. Such a collaboration with the writer is essential to project the characters as you want to. I’ve realised the importance of collaborating with others. Earlier, I used to be concerned with my own viewpoint.

  • You have worked with Irrfan Khan as a producer (The lunchbox). Tell us something about him.

    Irrfan was an extremely good actor. His understanding about life was deep. I tried to work with him as a director but it didn’t happen. He was a true artiste. He made it in mainstream cinema as well and took it to another level. His films Piku, Hindi Medium, English Medium… were well-received. He left abruptly. No one can take his place. He has left a big vacuum in the industry.

  • How do you spend your time in the Lockdown?

    I read books, scripts… I am also writing. I do yoga and exercise. I’d put on a lot of weight sometime back. I try to control my diet. I try cooking. I’ve realised I can work magic with leftover food. But now it’s getting tiring. Mental health is most important. Some days pass well, while some days are bad. When there’s too much negativity, I pull out a rug and sleep off.

  • What’s your mantra for survival?

    Just keep doing your work. I don’t get into any kind of competition. Competition means you have to win against the others. I’ve no desire to win. I just want to keep on walking, keep on running. But I don’t want to come first. The race is over once you secure the first position.

  • How do you handle trolling on social media?

    I’ve kept myself away from social media. Sometimes I say whatever I have to say and leave. I’ve stopped reading what people say. I only read the news written by people, whose opinion matters to me.

  • What made you choose Saiyami Kher as the protagonist in Choked?

    I had locked Saiyami way back at the end of 2016. Atul Kasbekar (filmmaker/photographer) introduced her to me. I felt she was correct for the character. She’s extremely simple unlike how she was seen in Mirzya. But she appeared too young for the role. So she put on weight for the role. She got herself clicked in a saree with a child. Her character is the mother of an eight-year-old. We zeroed in on Roshan (Mathew) in 2018. We felt we were ready to make the film.

  • The Last time I saw you on-screen Anurag was in Ghoomketu, which was just about a couple of weeks ago where you are a cop. Why are you covering your face?

  • So, you haven't seen the film?

  • Is it true and I haven't seen those films, but only heard about it that the past few times you have been on screen as an actor you have played a cop?

  • Speaking of which Anurag, It came up in a conversation or interview I once did with Imtiaz and this is from back in the 90s, there was a TV Serial made at that time and someone approached him to sort of cast for that TV Show and the first time in his life that he ever saw a portfolio that contained a bunch of pictures that you gave him of you in various poses. That was a fascinating story.

  • What is that movie that nobody saw and both of you starred in?

  • There is some work to be done to look forward, you know the other thing that I saw because you know we are walking down memory lane is a picture that you posted on Twitter I think a couple of days ago which was from the Mahurat Shot of Paanch. Is that right?

  • Which is your first film as a director but the movie never released. In the photo I can see Vikramaditya Motwane. Was he a part of the movie?

  • If you look it in, in terms of collaboration, you and Vikram from there on would be a very strong collaboration in the sense that in Sacred Games, Vikram was the show-runner and Anurag was a director. Vikram's first film Udaan, Anurag was a producer. It is a pretty solid partnership. How did you Guys meet for the first time?

  • I know a lot of people and they rightly consider you, one of the finest that we have had but I think your greatest contribution outside of film-making which is obvious and that is there to be seen is how you created an ecosystem of writers, technicians, actors in Versova where you currently are. There wasn't much going on in terms of a scene. Is there any story that you remember of people who you bumped into in the street or anywhere else? Are there any favorite stories?

  • I know a lot of people and they rightly consider you, one of the finest that we have had but I think your greatest contribution outside of film-making which is obvious and that is there to be seen is how you created an ecosystem of writers, technicians, actors in Versova where you currently are. There wasn't much going on in terms of a scene. Is there any story that you remember about people who you bumped into in the street or anywhere else? Are there any favorite stories?

  • Have you made like this random cameos in films where we can spot you before you became a director?

  • Did you get paid for the role?

  • I mean, this is around the time you already had a mansion in Bandstand?

  • Personally for you Anurag, you have been around the film industry in a sense you are a film industry kid now because you were a kid when you moved to Bombay. There was a certain perception that people had in terms of you as a person because you were extremely vocal, you would blog, you would not care about what you are saying about whoever, the consequences be damned in all that time. That is the audacity of youth but that hasn't changed so much about you over years or has it?

  • You have been an increasingly accessible person despite the success that you have had. Is that something that you continue with?

  • I want to take you back to 2017, when you addressed a crowd at Thyagaraja Stadium. You said about Udaan: the people who loved Udaan, watched it on their laptops. That does not bring in revenue. 10 years later, we are sitting across a pair of laptops, in a world where this has become the only reality. How has your cinema changed, how have you adapted your filmmaking for this 4x6 inch audience?

    I think I was quite prepared for it. I have been trained for it. Earlier also, when films would come out, people would watch it more after downloading it or Torrenting it. So, I make a film like I am supposed to make a film and people have the choice whether they want to watch it or not. The main thing for me about Netflix is that, it has not just changed the way I make movies, it has allowed me to offer and share the dignity and self-worth with the people who work for me. For instance, in a film like Udaan, almost everyone worked for the film for film. I don't think Vikramaditya Motwane got paid for the film. Ronit Roy took absolute pay cut and crew members had minimum wage because the film was made under the cost of Rs 2 to Rs 3 crore. Or even a film like Gulaal, where nobody took any money. People did films for the love of the movie, for love of me, for love of the script, for the love of each other.

  • This pandemic, of course, has been the test of all kinds of filmmaking. Which side of this theatre vs OTT release debate do you find yourself on?

    I think both cinema and OTT will co-exist. My thing with the theatre owners is that, they think that the films that should have released in theatres and are coming out on OTT, and they are reacting to it. But the thing is when cinemas will open, there will be such a bottleneck of movies, that there will be struggle. I have suffered when Gangs of Wasseypur was nine days in cinemas and Ek Tha Tiger came out, and the film was doing well, but it was totally thrown out of cinemas. So when the discussion is happening, discussions are the reactions to movies like Gulabo Sitabo and Shakuntala Devi, who have big stars in them. I haven't heard that kind of discussion for a movie like Bamfaad Or Eeb Allay Ooo. Nobody is asking where are these films. That's also a very self-serving fight. If you are self-serving, then everybody else has the right to be self-serving. People have to look out for their own recoveries.

  • Your art has always been kind of unsettling. Black Friday, Ugly, Gulaal, Gangs, all of them. You have also said that you make films to disturb the audience. Do you think you sort of balanced that unsettling the audience with a, sort of, happy ending, in Choked?

    In the dynamics of the film, you need an ending to sum it up. The sequence when the raid happens, that's the point when you realise everybody was getting the money and the happy ending is the end of an actual process. I spoke to a lot of income-tax people, income-tax officers also, and somebody who points the tax department towards the money, they get the 10 per cent reward, they get that letter. So, we just wanted a normal ending. Some things have due process in our system and I cannot take away the due process to serve an end that I want them to disturb them and say that in the end nothing happens. It does happen, that one thing is in place. So, it needed to come to a natural end like that. If the film didn't have the demonetisation angle to it, the ending would have been different.

  • You have been a vocal critic of a lot of things that this government has been doing for the past six years now. And demonetisation was that rare occasion when you actually praised the government. But then, of course, everything sort of fell apart. The reports started coming out.

    Yes, yes, I did. But then you get a perspective on it. When your leader, your Prime Minister makes an announcement that affects all of us, the normal assumption, the normal reaction is that they have thought it through. It's not an impulsive decision. There is administrative services, there is a department, the whole ministry, that must have been planning it for 8-9 months, everything would be in place, before they implement a decision, right? But that wasn't so, we realised that he has given us 4 hours and then kept extending the deadline, changing the amount of money you can withdraw and you realise there was no plan. And since then, we have seen it happening non-stop. All the decisions are last moment. The lockdown, CAA-NRC, everything is just so impulsive and then and there. Announce it today, implement tomorrow and then force it on to people. I still remember when the day the lockdown was announced, my first tweet was what about the migrants. And I was trolled mercilessly for saying that.

  • This is also because when you are so isolated from the reality, from what is happening on the ground, that from your ivory tower, you can comment 'how does it matter'.

    You see, just 7 per cent people are on Twitter. I wonder if the migrants on the streets who are suffering are even aware if there is a Twitter, they probably don't have a smartphone. Hum log ghar par baithke baatein kar rahe hai, hum log sadak pe nahi hai.

  • I saw Choked is for Shubhra Shetty. What is the story there?

    She was the one who brought the script to me and this around 2015 and she didn't see a lot of my films because she says that she gets disturbed by them. And she said if you made this movie, I will watch it. So, I made this film, it was like a thank you. She has watched it now and she is very happy with it.

  • In the past, the Censor Board has tried 'choking' your work, so to say. If you were to release Choked in a theatre today, what all do you think the Censor Board would have objected to?

    I think Choked would have realised easily. My relationship with the Censor Board has been tumultuous but there has always been a process in place. So until Udta Punjab happened, until Pahlaj Nihalani was the head of the Censor Board, because none of films got censored before that, none of my films got cut. I had different kinds of battles - take the no smoking sign out of Ugly. But I have never had that kind of battle where my film eventually did not come out, but suddenly after that, in Udta Punjab the fight happened. If Mukkabaaz can be cleared by the censors... Choked is not a propaganda film or anti-something. It is a about an event, it is a very objective film. I don't see any reason why Choked would have had that kind of battle. I happy that it is coming out on Netflix. In my head, I was making the film and Netflix is the right platform because it will reach the right audience at the right time.

  • he tussle between Sarita and Sushant is essentially a lot of homes in the post-2014 India. Who is the believer in your family? How do you deal with them?

    I have a lot of people who are total believers. We disagree... we agree to disagree. Now they don't discuss things; earlier they would say that 'don't say this', 'don't say that', but now they have stopped. They are letting me be. A lot of them are still confused. A lot of them still feel like... their actual feelings are very different now. A lot of people still believe in Mr Modi, but they think Mr Amit Shah is making him look bad. Or someone else is making him look bad.

  • There's a sort of disillusionment...

    There is this disillusionment, but there is also somebody else to blame for this disillusionment. In many people's heads, the Prime Minister is incorruptible, but the people around him are making him look bad. When I see tweets also, they say the states are letting him down in handling the pandemic, but he's the one doing his best. So all those things happen. Everybody has their own opinion, and I don't like to force my opinion on people. I genuinely believe that only life experiences teach people the truth about everything. People always understand everything in retrospect. And I got it differently on demonetisation in retrospect. On the day of it, I was also one of those guys who were actually very happy.

  • Yes, but then, we all saw how it turned out, and then we have Choked as a summing up of whatever happened...

    Yes, Choked is a summing up of what happened.

  • All these complaints, these abuses, these 'you should die', this and that type of comments on Twitter that you get...

    I ignore it. I totally ignore it. When I tweet something, I don't read a reply. Sometimes people I follow, when they reply, that also comes on the other feed, very rarely I go and, you know... I don't read them.

  • And occasionally, you throw those missiles!

    Ya, occasionally, but abhi kam ho gaya hai. Abhi I spend even less time on it.

  • I want to take you back to 2017, when you addressed a crowd at Thyagaraja Stadium. You said about Udaan: the people who loved Udaan, watched it on their laptops. That does not bring in revenue. 10 years later, we are sitting across a pair of laptops, in a world where this has become the only reality. How has your cinema changed, how have you adapted your filmmaking for this 4x6 inch audience?

    I think I was quite prepared for it. I have been trained for it. Earlier also, when films would come out, people would watch it more after downloading it or Torrenting it. So, I make a film like I am supposed to make a film and people have the choice whether they want to watch it or not. The main thing for me about Netflix is that, it has not just changed the way I make movies, it has allowed me to offer and share the dignity and self-worth with the people who work for me. For instance, in a film like Udaan, almost everyone worked for the film for film. I don't think Vikramaditya Motwane got paid for the film. Ronit Roy took absolute pay cut and crew members had minimum wage because the film was made under the cost of Rs 2 to Rs 3 crore. Or even a film like Gulaal, where nobody took any money. People did films for the love of the movie, for love of me, for love of the script, for the love of each other. Today it is not the same. Today, I have the appropriate amount of money that I need to make a film, based on the script and content, not based on who is in it. And I can pay the actual wages and I can pay people money that allows them to live their life with dignity and self-worth, and they are not doing charity for me. And I am not under any obligation. So, that's the revenue that a film generates for me beforehand so I can share it with everyone, and then we have the right way of making a movie. Like, Choked is a very uncompromised film. We created the interior set of the house and shot on green screen to create the right atmosphere, and that shows in the film. Everybody talks about the technicality and how did we achieve it. Because we get the right amount, we aren't compromising, we aren't stealing shots, we are doing things the right way.

  • This pandemic, of course, has been the test of all kinds of filmmaking. Which side of this theatre vs OTT release debate do you find yourself on?

    I think both cinema and OTT will co-exist. My thing with the theatre owners is that, they think that the films that should have released in theatres and are coming out on OTT, and they are reacting to it. But the thing is when cinemas will open, there will be such a bottleneck of movies, that there will be struggle. I have suffered when Gangs of Wasseypur was nine days in cinemas and Ek Tha Tiger came out, and the film was doing well, but it was totally thrown out of cinemas. So when the discussion is happening, discussions are the reactions to movies like Gulabo Sitabo and Shakuntala Devi, who have big stars in them. I haven't heard that kind of discussion for a movie like Bamfaad Or Eeb Allay Ooo. Nobody is asking where are these films. That's also a very self-serving fight. If you are self-serving, then everybody else has the right to be self-serving. People have to look out for their own recoveries.

  • Your art has always been kind of unsettling. Black Friday, Ugly, Gulaal, Gangs, all of them. You have also said that you make films to disturb the audience. Do you think you sort of balanced that unsettling the audience with a, sort of, happy ending, in Choked?

    In the dynamics of the film, you need an ending to sum it up. The sequence when the raid happens, that's the point when you realise everybody was getting the money and the happy ending is the end of an actual process. I spoke to a lot of income-tax people, income-tax officers also, and somebody who points the tax department towards the money, they get the 10 per cent reward, they get that letter. So, we just wanted a normal ending. Some things have due process in our system and I cannot take away the due process to serve an end that I want them to disturb them and say that in the end nothing happens. It does happen, that one thing is in place. So, it needed to come to a natural end like that. If the film didn't have the demonetisation angle to it, the ending would have been different.

  • You have been a vocal critic of a lot of things that this government has been doing for the past six years now. And demonetisation was that rare occasion when you actually praised the government. But then, of course, everything sort of fell apart. The reports started coming out...

    Yes, yes, I did. But then you get a perspective on it. When your leader, your Prime Minister makes an announcement that affects all of us, the normal assumption, the normal reaction is that they have thought it through. It's not an impulsive decision. There is administrative services, there is a department, the whole ministry, that must have been planning it for 8-9 months, everything would be in place, before they implement a decision, right? But that wasn't so, we realised that he has given us 4 hours and then kept extending the deadline, changing the amount of money you can withdraw and you realise there was no plan. And since then, we have seen it happening non-stop. All the decisions are last moment. The lockdown, CAA-NRC, everything is just so impulsive and then and there. Announce it today, implement tomorrow and then force it on to people. I still remember when the day the lockdown was announced, my first tweet was what about the migrants. And I was trolled mercilessly for saying that.

  • This is also because when you are so isolated from the reality, from what is happening on the ground, that from your ivory tower, you can comment 'how does it matter'.

    You see, just 7 per cent people are on Twitter. I wonder if the migrants on the streets who are suffering are even aware if there is a Twitter, they probably don't have a smartphone. Hum log ghar par baithke baatein kar rahe hai, hum log sadak pe nahi hai.

  • How was it for you to meet Quentin Tarantino and Martin Scorsese for the first time?

  • Did you have a similar sort of experience when you moved to Bombay or was Bollywood something very different from how you perceived World Cinema in the first place?

  • On a personal front Anurag, you have two siblings who are into films. While you being a producer in so many films, we have never seen you collaborate with your siblings.

  • Three siblings, all the three of them into films. All of you clearly had the same upbringing to a huge extent. Was there someone in your family who had inspired you to come into cinema?

  • Personally for you Anurag, you are a writer, director and presuming the sense I get is that you actually got into films, or got into direction primarily first being a writer because that is what you had an inclination in from an early age. After all these years if you have to choose in between being a director or a writer, what would you choose?

  • Was it after Bombay Velvet if I am not mistaken that you actually put out a asocial media post saying "Hey Guys, if you have a script give it to me" before it was almost given that if you are writing is when you are directing, you hadn't worked on anyone else's script in any case. Is that correct?

  • Manmarziyaan, now when you got into that film, a good portion of the film had already been shot with a different director and actors. How was that for you, a creative professional to enter a scene so late in the day like completely as a professional director rather than a writer-director?

  • Anurag, a lot of people who have worked with you in the past as actors who have been on this show, have spoken about your direction process and unless they are really good actors, they would not even survive your process. You don't say cut or action apparently. Nobody knows when you are going to start or finish a particular scene. Is that template you've sort of developed over years or is somebody whose works you have admired and taken some elements of that from there?

  • There are certain aspects of your film that people do not understand. Here is one element where you wanted to communicate through your films and some people did not get it, you can ignore that fact while the other element is the artistic side of the sense, this is self-expression, where you can say some people got it while others didn't but I have communicated what I wanted to communicate. Where do you find yourself in this debate?

  • Did demonetization fall in your lap in that sense as an element in the story? Was there a story before demonetization or was it a starting point?

  • Your movie Bombay Velvet was very much similar to the Hollywood movie Scarface. Were you deeply inspired by Scarface when you were thinking, writing and filming Bombay Velvet?

  • Other things that the movie managed to achieve like most of your movies is it became a bunch of memes, it became a conversation piece. We are going to finish this conversation with a few things that became talking points and if you can remember if there are any stories behind those things. Number one, is the one thing that we all remember when we think of Dev D for instance is emotional atyachaar. Two words that defined that film in real sense, do you remember how you came up with those two words?

  • The other thing that everybody talks about is from Gangs of Wasseypur, there is the famous line of 'Tumse na ho payega', is there a story behind it?

  • And "Keh ke lunga"?

  • Talking of scenes because we are wrapping up, if I have to think of one of the greatest scenes that you have done would be from Black Friday and it would be the chase sequence. Is there a story behind the chase sequence in Black Friday?

  • Final Question Anurag, there is the film buff side of you and we are all in lockdown for a very long time, if you were stuck in a situation where you could have only one film to watch for sixty or seventy days that it has been, which one would you pick?

  • We are amongst the unfortunate ones who could watch only the first part of Gangs of Wasseypur. Why did you make this movie in two parts?

  • In the past 15 to 20 years, we can see that most of the new age directors are keen on making crime related movies like Satya, Company, Kaminey, Maqbool, etc. Is this somehow related to the current status of the society where crime has increased but is concealed or a new genre of movies is born that takes a reference from reality?

  • You just said that you wanted to show a change in the process of crime in this movie (Gangs of Wasseypur), was the voice-over that you had used as a means to explain the change your own decision?

  • Your films have a lot of violence and slang words used in it...

  • Do you accept that your movie has achieved a cult status in the genre of violence and slang words?

  • Black Friday was amongst the best of your films...

  • The Reviewers have been touched by the violence, language and the regions used in the film.

  • So are you agreeing that you haven't stereotyped anything in the film, especially in the case of Qureshi and Pathan?

  • You have stylized the acts of two assassins in this movie. While making this up, did you ever think of how it would impact the viewers?

  • There is a dialogue in the film, which goes like " I am alive and everybody else is dead because I don't watch movies. It makes you dumb", you are from the Film fraternity and yet you use disrespectful dialogues about movies. Why? What is your attitude towards Hindi Cinema?

  • In you movie Gangs of Wasseypur Part 1 & 2, we do not get to see the presence of media when everything else is present. The Newspaper had surely been present in the region. Why did you exclude the media?

  • All your movies have a regional effect on the dialect of the dialogues said by the actors. Like in Gangs of Wasseypur the bhojpuri accent had been used, in Dev D there was a Punjabi environment...

  • Do you think that you have defamed the City of Wasseypur?

  • What inspired you so much that it led you from a Zoology graduate into film-making?

  • When you moved to Bombay, how much money did you actually carry with yourself?

  • When you came to Bombay, there was a lot of people you met which shaped a whole lot of your career. Who were they?

  • Some films, like “Gulal” were shot over 8 years. How did you maintain the continuity?

  • In your career, one thing has stood beside you and that is writing. Also, your brother accepted writing orders on your behalf. Any childhood memories you want to share?

  • Even facing a number of struggles and non-stop drama in your life, what is that piece of advice that you want to give