Akshay Kumar Curated

Actor, Producer, Martial Artist

CURATED BY :  


  • What according to you are the DOs and DON'Ts of fitness?

  • What do you have to say about girls taking up sports as their career?

  • Now you stated that you went to Bangkok to learn Martial Arts. Were you in other countries and cities as well and what did you learn from the experience?

  • You went on your Black belt journey inspired by someone. But where did the natural inclination towards sports come from?

  • Now in movies you have tackled a lot of different roles, did you face any challenges while preparing from them

  • Recently you are mostly into movie with social messages.Does a movie with a social message affect you personally?

    Yes, to a certain point, it does affect me. When you take up a film like Pad Man, you start learning about facts and real stories — this maid’s story, that villager’s story, some girl who committed suicide because somebody teased her about menstruation — and all of this makes you think. You feel so strongly about such things that you just want to push this film.

  • Now there are also Ups and Downs in an actors career , take Rajesh Khanna ji for example, you being his son-in-law may have observed certain changes in him as he stepped down from that super-star spotlight?

  • There are actors who take up such social films and work towards a cause only till their film’s release, do you also work like that?

    It’s not just a film or acting for me. Once the film releases, it doesn’t mean my job is over. In about four-five days, I will shoot a documentary for the Government about sanitation. Even Bhumi (Pednekar) has been asked to do it as a public service. I decided to take it up because I believed in it. I can’t even talk about what I’ve seen, read or heard about traditional menstruation practices. Around 42 crore women don’t use sanitary pads. Even if it changes three, five or 10 per cent, I would consider it great.

  • There are actors who take up such social films and work towards a cause only till their film’s release, do you follow the same?

    It’s not just a film or acting for me. Once the film releases, it doesn’t mean my job is over. In about four-five days, I will shoot a documentary for the Government about sanitation. Even Bhumi (Pednekar) has been asked to do it as a public service. I decided to take it up because I believed in it. I can’t even talk about what I’ve seen, read or heard about traditional menstruation practices. Around 42 crore women don’t use sanitary pads. Even if it changes three, five or 10 per cent, I would consider it great.

  • Initially, you were known for only action-oriented films. Now, that perception has changed and you are exploring new boundaries why is that so?

    That’s an achievement for me. When a filmmaker thinks about a film and feels that only I can do the role, it makes me happy. They won’t think that yeh toh comedy hai, tragedy hai, yeh villain ka role hai — they know they can come to me with all of it. I have done it with my hard work and my parents’ blessings. Earlier, there were so many films being made, but I would only get a small chunk of action flicks. The rest were taken up by other actors. I would never get them. That hunger got me to attempt different kind of movies.

  • Your films not only inspire but entertain, too. Is that the sole mission as an actor?

    Most of my films be it Padman (2018), Toilet: Ek Prem Katha (2017) or even (the upcoming) Mission Mangal, they have one more thing — women’s empowerment. But I’ve to do a Housefull, a Rowdy Rathore and a Good News also. So, it’s not that this [issue-based films] is the only thing I do. Whenever I get a chance and a good script, I’ll do it. I want to have all kinds of films in my kitty.

  • Your upcoming films belong to different genres. Is it exciting to juggle so many different roles?

    All these things have been taught to me by my own experience. I’ve learned that if I do different genres, I won’t be tagged. When I used to do a lot of action, everyone said, ‘He is an action hero and nothing else’. So, I tried comedy, and then everyone was talking about just that. Then I decided I’ve to do different kinds of films. So, I am thankful to people, and the media, for criticising me to that point and bringing out the best in me.

  • In terms of female co-stars, you’ve worked with leading heroines as well as fresh faces. How do you strike that balance?

    It doesn’t really matter because what’s important is that the person has to suit the role. It’s not about how big the actor is. And not just female co-stars, it applies to the male actors, too. A lot of times I’ve lost roles. Though I thought I’d be very good (for those roles), the makers felt I won’t be able to perform. When I signed Toilet..., I was told I wouldn’t be able to carry it off. But I took it as a challenge and said, ‘let me try’. Also, there were times when I myself didn’t feel I fit the part, and backed off.

  • Your films not only inspire but entertain, too. Is that the sole mission as an actor?

    Most of my films be it Padman (2018), Toilet: Ek Prem Katha (2017) or even (the upcoming) Mission Mangal, they have one more thing — women’s empowerment. But I’ve to do a Housefull, a Rowdy Rathore and a Good News also. So, it’s not that this [issue-based films] is the only thing I do. Whenever I get a chance and a good script, I’ll do it. I want to have all kinds of films in my kitty.

  • Your upcoming films belong to different genres. Is it exciting to juggle so many different roles?

    All these things have been taught to me by my own experience. I’ve learned that if I do different genres, I won’t be tagged. When I used to do a lot of action, everyone said, ‘He is an action hero and nothing else’. So, I tried comedy, and then everyone was talking about just that. Then I decided I’ve to do different kinds of films. So, I am thankful to people, and the media, for criticising me to that point and bringing out the best in me.

  • Many of your films have released globally. Does that give a sense of contentment?

    It’s great to see our films being accepted globally. I hope doors are opened in all countries. There are many brilliant films that should go all over the world. I personally feel what Indian cinema is doing, and the kind of scripts it’s bringing on to the screen, even Hollywood is not doing such kind of work.

  • Why haven’t we seen you take up a Hollywood film yet?

    I wouldn’t say I’ve not been offered Hollywood films, but whatever came wasn’t big enough or that great. And I’m very happy doing films here [in Bollywood]. If something very good and effective comes that lets me show my talent in a better way, I would love to do it.

  • What’s driven the change to make movies like that?

    It depends on how I'm feeling. When I heard Arunachalam Muruganantham's story, as well as the facts - 82 per cent of Indian women, that's about 42 crore women - don't wear pads because they don't have the money or because they've been told to use rags or ash or hay because they want to be "closer to nature" - I felt compelled to do this story. But now I'm doing Kesari, a war film. I'm also 50 now... How much time do I have left? How much can my body take? Realistically, I probably have another five years to do action, so I'd like to do as much of it while I can.

  • How have you managed to stay relevant for 25 years in such a brutal business?

    The only thing that attracts audiences is change, because it's intriguing. On my part, I keep myself alive by not settling for what's comfortable or easy.

  • Which decade of your movie-making career have you most enjoyed? How have they been different?

    The first decade was the Khiladi days. I was only doing action. In the second decade, I tried my hand at other things - comedy and romance - and tried to get the directors and producers to see me in another light, to listen, and understand, and give me different work.

  • Was the process of convincing the directors to look at you in a different light difficult?

    It was a huge struggle to change my image. Very few people trusted that I could do more. But I didn't want to do what I was doing any more because I was so bored - of getting up in the morning, going for shoots and being told: Do a flying kick, OK now a roundhouse kick. It became very monotonous. The first 10 years of my career, I wasn't acting at all; I was running a martial arts school on screen. I caught a lucky break with Priyadarshan's Hera Pheri, and then things began to change. This decade is about pushing my limits and changing with every film. Earlier, I'd experiment every 3 or 4 years. Now I want to do something entirely different with each film.

  • What do you and Twinkle fight most about?

    I like to pamper my family when we travel on holidays, but my wife doesn't like it. She prefers to keep things simple. She'll ask: Why do we have to travel on a private charter? Can't we fly commercial? We could have stayed in a two-bedroom villa. We don't need three... And so it goes.

  • Does your son accompany you for workouts?

  • You are also a person who likes to keep a fit , how has your fitness regimen evolved, your body changed with age?

    I train to have fun. I don't work out to smash reps. I like to compete during my sessions, and mix it up - repetition is for the braindead. I couldn't train on the same machines day in, day out. I like to climb stairs, shadow box, ensure my kung fu kicks are up to scratch, jump off boxes and rock climb. Hydrotherapy is my new favourite form of exercise... it offers high resistance with no impact.

  • We also know you are quit the practitioner of parkour , do you do it often?

    Parkour will always be a hobby, but you can only jump off so many rooftops until your life flashes before your eyes, so I prefer to save those moves for the big screen. Fitness is about balance. There's no need to push yourself so hard in the gym one day that you can't return the next. Listen to your body, and stay attuned to nature. Don't be the fool who takes substances to enhance muscles you'll never be able to maintain. Natural is sexy.

  • What’s a life lesson you’ve taken away from your martial arts training?

    Never fight in anger. When someone tries to hurt or humiliate me, I'm entirely capable of lashing out and retaliating twice as hard. But then I remember my three idols - my father, Gandhiji and Bruce Lee, who once said, "Flow like water, anger is only poison for the heart." In life, as in martial arts, do what you do out of love and passion, and if you've got to fight, do it only to protect your loved ones.

  • What’s a life lesson you’ve taken away from your martial arts training?

    Never fight in anger. When someone tries to hurt or humiliate me, I'm entirely capable of lashing out and retaliating twice as hard. But then I remember my three idols - my father, Gandhiji and Bruce Lee, who once said, "Flow like water, anger is only poison for the heart." In life, as in martial arts, do what you do out of love and passion, and if you've got to fight, do it only to protect your loved ones.

  • What was your initial reaction when you heard/read the script for “Mission Mangal”?

    When our director, Jagan, narrated the script, he told me astonishing facts that really opened my eyes. I was drawn to ‘Mission Mangal’ instantly because the fact that India launched a satellite mission to Mars in the quickest amount of time and with the smallest budget in comparison to NASA, China and Russia. It was certainly a story that needed to be told. As his sister works at ISRO as a scientist, Jagan had a clearer picture about the characters, their portrayal and the entire mission per say.

  • What drew you to the character of “Rakesh Dhawan in the movie”?

    I was extremely proud that I was chosen to play the character of Rakesh Dhawan and to represent one of the biggest moments on India’s space history on screens. What made me even more compelled to be a part of the film was the fact that this was a real story of ordinary people doing extraordinary things, achieving huge feats and inspiring generations to dream big.

  • What drew you to the character of “Rakesh Dhawan” in the movie?

    I was extremely proud that I was chosen to play the character of Rakesh Dhawan and to represent one of the biggest moments on India’s space history on screens. What made me even more compelled to be a part of the film was the fact that this was a real story of ordinary people doing extraordinary things, achieving huge feats and inspiring generations to dream big.

  • Can you describe the research you did for the role, regarding mission control and management, space missions, perhaps speaking with the scientists at ISRO, etc.?

    I got to learn a lot about space science thanks to this role, as I play the Mission Director. Besides updating my vocabulary with scientific terms like ‘trajectory,’ the meaning of which I still don’t understand (chuckles), there wasn’t really any special preparation required for the role as such. Like with all my films, I followed my director’s instructions as he’s the one person who understands the film better than any of us.

  • How long did it take to prepare for — and get in the headspace of — this role?

    I definitely didn’t know much about India’s Mars mission prior to the film. I didn’t realize just how magnificent the team at ISRO’s achievements were until I learned about the facts. It was a truly an overwhelming experience to sink into the character, even though I have done over 150 films. We were bringing to the screen one of the proudest moments in Indian space history, and we had to be extremely responsible in our portrayal of the scientists, as we wanted to do absolute justice to their achievement, innovation and genius. Jagan had immense clarity, and all my co-stars did their job so well that it inspired me to put my best foot forward, too.

  • You’re sharing the screen with so many powerful, outspoken females; do you think this will help to change Indian cinema’s male-centric views/priorities?

    In ‘Mission Mangal,’ we were one big team and learned so much. Being placed in the shoes of a space scientist allowed us to investigate a completely different profession, and a small glimpse at how hard-working the people in this industry are. ‘Mission Mangal’ is neither a male centric or woman centric film — central to the film is the focus of having an empowered mind, where every human being has the opportunity to think with unlimited possibilities to achieve unlimited feats.

  • Was there anything in the “Mission Mangal” story or anything from your real life that inspired you to help bring awareness to more women in strong, lead roles?

    I feel truly blessed to be surrounded by such incredible women in my life, be it my mother, my wife or my mother-in-law, and even my 6-year-old daughter. All of them have been of immense value addition to my life and their experiences have inspired me as each day they contribute to my growth on a personal and professional level.

  • Like in “Gold” and “Padman,” you’ve starred in multiple films that tell the inspiring true stories of Indian figures. Why was telling the “Mission Mangal” story important to you, and what did it mean to you as an actor and as an individual?

    I truly believe in the subject matters of the films I pursue and take on those projects hoping they will have an impact, which I believe they can. I have only been investing myself in projects that I am deeply passionate about, even when others may be skeptical about them. Films I have done with that mentality including ‘Toilet – Ek Prem Katha‘ and ‘Padman’ are a result of this mentality, and they were so worth the risk

  • Why tell this story now?

    Indian cinema has taken on a more serious tone in the past few years, and I believe it has been for the better, because we are focusing more on the reality of Indian life. We are a very high achieving nation, with so many amazing stories to tell. ‘Mission Mangal’ particularly focuses on a such an amazing true story that is timely and an inspiration.

  • How do you feel the film will impact people?

    The film, I believe, will strike a chord with the young and old alike. I would love for parents to take their young children to watch this film and maybe we will have more children aspiring to be scientists.

  • You’ve had a long and storied career in the Bollywood industry, what’s the main difference in Hindi cinema now versus 30 years ago?

    Cinema is a reflection of the society, and is bound to be influenced by the changes brought about in our society. Needless to say that Indian society has drastically evolved in a plethora of ways in the last three decades, which is also reflected in the ways our films are being produced and consumed. The content of our cinema has expanded to embrace new perspectives and fresh story ideas, which are broadening not only the appeal of our cinema to wider audiences but attempting to spotlight issues, themes and topics that have traditionally been deemed taboo, niche or more suited to parallel cinema. Our industry has certainly become more inclusive and progressive to reflect the zeitgeist.

  • Director Jagan Shakti was to make “Ikka” with you in place of this film, which is going to be made only now. Why did “Mission Mangal” get priority?

    One day, while we were working on “Ikka,” Jagan casually mentioned that his sister was a scientist and told me a one-line idea of the story. I told him to work on it, and within 20 days, he came up with a brief story that he had co-written with Balki. We decided to go ahead with this story first.

  • Was this done so that you could again plan an Independence Day release of a patriotic film?

    No, all that happened naturally. Our film is about our Mars Mission and the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO), and we did not even know that on our release date it celebrates 50 years of coming into existence! We came to know that just a few weeks ago! I have never even visited ISRO. Now I am also proud that my company has produced the first-ever Hindi film on Space Research. Did you know that this year, 18 percent of the budget has been allocated for Space Research as against just two or three percent earlier? Chandrayaan 2 is just one example of how important Space Research has become now.

  • You have kept doing a lot of films today that are nation-oriented. Don’t you miss the normal entertainers you are known for?

    But I keep doing them! I am doing “Housefull 4” and “Ikka.” “Sooryavanshi” and “Bachchan Pandey” are also very entertaining. I must just like the character and the script. I did not have too long a role in many of my films, like “Khakee” or “OMG - Oh My God!” and had just a cameo in “Dishoom.” I like to balance my work. There was a time, as I have been telling you guys over the years, that I was branded and did nothing but action, action and action. Then some truly good friends like Priyadarshan, Dharmesh Darshan and Tanuja Chandra made me do comedies, love stories and drama. I have enjoyed doing every kind of film.

  • Why isn’t there any in multi-hero films like “Sooryavanshi” at the present day and age?

    In that film, Ajay Devgn and Ranveer Singh are likely to play cameos. Look, I really do not see why we all cannot do two-, three- or four-hero films. It’s all insecurity, I think. Why can’t we make “Amar Akbar Anthony” today? (He does not mean a remake but a three-hero film with big stars). If you see the films in my early years, I have worked with almost every star. I have even done a 7-hero film in “Jaani Dushman - Ek Anokhi Kahani.” And “Mission Mangal” has five heroines!

  • When you first started doing unconventional roles, were you warned by well-wishers against doing some of them?

    Of course, I was advised against doing half my roles! “Dishoom,” the forthcoming “Laxmmi Bomb” and films like “Khakee” and “Hera Pheri” among others like “Toilet - Ek Prem Katha” and “Pad-Man.”

  • How are you maximizing the appeal of “Mission Mangal?”

    We have released the trailer also in Marathi, Gujarati and Punjabi. We also hope to get Tax-Free status, but over here, that is usually declared in the second or third week, whereas it is the first week that is actually important!

  • Do you ever take a pause and think that this has been your biggest moment with the roster of movies that you have or has it always been your time?

  • Now with movies like Airlift,Gold and even Kesari which have these patriotic feels to them will all these lead to a career in Pollitics?

  • Do you feel, as an artist, you are in that place where you can impact massive social change?

  • Do you still think of yourself as a stuntman and then an actor?

  • What is the biggest burden in being a Bollywood superstar?

  • Do you have any moments of insecurity?

  • So what according to you are some of the positive insecurities that you have?

  • Previously you had said you went into acting because of the money, but you are already one of the most wealthiest actors in the world, how has that relationship with money changed?

  • In an interview with Anupam Kher you had talked about your father , are you concerned how will you instill the same values on your children?

  • Do you believe your children can have the same drive, that you had as you were starting,considering they were born and bought up in more less tough situations ?

  • We see that most of your recent biopic and nation oriented movies were based on quite recent incidents ,but you also made “Gold’ and “Kesari” and such movies about incidents which people may not have heard of. So why make movies on those topics? lets begin with “Gold” why tell it’s story?

  • What are your personal views on history as a subject of movies, especially on that time in history (Pre-independant India) which most historicals focus on?

  • Now when it comes to the Pre-Independence topic related movies ,most movies made focus on the freedom struggle or the lives of freedom fighters ,this movie focuses on sports, so what makes Gold’s topic unique?

  • Coming back to the social message movies and biopics you made, what is one of the main reasons you feel as an actor pushes you to do these movies?

  • Coming back to the social message movies you made, what is one of best feedbacks you got for them?

  • You have been doing these particular style of movies based on patriotism and social messages for a couple of years and now you embark on projects like Sooryvanshi and Houseful 4 , what would you say to your fans who are concerned about this sudden abrupt change in your decision?

  • You were on the Forbes list of highest paid actors last year , how does it feel to be recognised for all the hard work?

  • You were on the Forbes list of highest paid actors last year , how does it feel to be recognised for all the hard work?

  • You also said you were planning movie on the dowry system ,is that still in works?

  • You have also been a keen supporter of sports, what fascinates you about it?

  • Being 52 years old ,you are one of the most fittest actors of Bollywood, so everyone does wonder what are the do’s and don’ts of Akshay Kumar’s fitness regime?

  • You have also tried to incorporate your fitness regime into your family, we have also seen videos of you working out with your son , so how have you been ale to bring about that habit into your life?

  • What are some of the strict rules of nutrition that you follow?

  • You were recently seen promoting the Hindustan Times Great Indian Football Action (HT Gifa) event , how do you feel as an avid sports and health fanatic does the cause help the Indian sports scenario?

  • You are also avid follower of the ministers “Fit India Movement”, how important do you think this initiative is?

  • You have done quite a number of versatile roles, and have covered nearly every genre of movie, so why go with a movie like “Houseful 4”?

  • Lookin back at your journey do you have any regrets you made in your movie career and also how if it has influenced your current stardom ,it has already been quit a phenominal year in your career?

  • Coming to your family , your wife Twinkle Khanna ji is an excellent writer, in fact “Pad Man” was based on her adaption of the story of Sri Muruganatham, Do you read or are ever curious about her work ?

  • You have worked with her (Twinkle Khanna) as a co-star in many films , did you ever think that she would become a writer and how did feel about it??

  • Is it because of your love for sports that attracted you to make a movie like “Gold” ?

  • You have played various kinds of characters ,from different cultural backgrounds, like in Gold you played a Bengali man, how do you go about to perfect the mannerisms and portrayal of the characters ?

  • A curious thing about Gold was that you actually play the manager of the hockey team rather than getting in on the action or playing any hockey yourself, did you feel as the lead actor that you were missing out on certain things?

  • A curious thing about Gold was that you actually play the manager of the hockey team rather than getting in on the action or playing any hockey yourself, did you feel as the lead actor that you were missing out on certain things?

  • You also recently said that you wanted to make a biopic of Hima Das the olympic sprinter , there were also some tweets following that stating that the character should be played by an Asamese actress, how important to you think a person’s ethnicity is when portraying a character?

  • While a section of the audience enjoyed Housefull 4, the hashtag #FakeHousefull4numbers was trending on social media. Did that bother you?

    It doesn’t bother me. I haven’t given out these figures na. Fox Star Studios has huge credibility. It’s a corporate based in Los Angeles. They make international films worth millions of dollars. Increasing the figures by a few crores won’t make any difference to them. So, let’s talk sense. When they mention the figures on their own handle, they don’t need to lie about anything. Also, Inox (multiplex chain) has explained the calculations. They won’t lie. They aren’t related to me. The heads of all the theatre chains have spoken. Why would they lie?

  • Housefull 4 is your 11th consecutive hit since Airlift. Yet certain sections question you. Why?

    I don’t know about that. I just know that I’ve signed my next four films. Having a job matters. Your company is running. That matters. I have another three films lined-up, which I have to give a go ahead to. (Smiles) So according to me, I’m doing pretty well.

  • How difficult is it to pull off a comedy?

    It’s difficult to pull off humour when you have to rely solely on physical comedy and keep logic away. Only Charlie Chaplin could do that. Without dialogue he could make people laugh. Or even Laurel And Hardy. We’ve grown up watching them. An actor can churn out dialogue and make people laugh. But to make people laugh without words is the toughest.

  • Do you feel comedy as a genre has been ignored?

    I’ve been trying to find the answer to this since the last 30 years. I still don’t have one. Everyone believes comedy’s easy. Ask anyone in Hollywood and they will tell you comedy is the most difficult genre.

  • Your transformation from action films to the comedy genre… was it a planned process?

    It’s not some thought out method. I just go with the flow. I didn’t go to any acting school. I just add what I’ve gained through my own experiences. Like just after Mission Mangal released, I started shooting for Laxmmi Bomb. After giving interviews about a scientist’s character, I jumped into another film. You take a full U-turn. I tend to hold the director’s hand because he knows the film a thousand times better than me. He leads me and that’s why he’s called the captain of the ship. (Laughs) You can only pray that that ship doesn’t turn out to be a Titanic.

  • Which have been your path-defining movies?

    A couple of them like Sangharsh (Tanuja Chandra, 2000), Jaanwar (Suneel Darshan, 1999) and Hera Pheri (Priyadarshan, 2000). Priyadarshan saab, Raj Kumar Santoshiji (Khakee, 2004) the late Neeraj Vohra (Phir Hera Pheri, 2006) … these three people contributed greatly in making me realise that I could attempt different genres and mold myself as an actor.

  • On an average you deliver four hits in a year. Are you always confident of the choices you make as an actor?

    No, I’m not confident ya. My team knows how scared I am before a release. You work hard for months. You have to consider whether the audience/critics will like your film. Gharwalon ka alag tension hota hai whether they’ll like it or not. You’ve got to handle the PR stress, the studio’s tension... To release one film, a person has to go through innumerable tensions.

  • What is your earliest memory of hockey?

    I used to play hockey in school. I remember my father getting me a hockey stick when I was around seven. I used to go to Sion-Koliwada to practise.I recall dribbling one winter morning with fog all around.

  • What made you take up Gold?

    It’s the story about our first Olympic gold medal, which we won in 1948. There was so much happening in the country that the gold medal wasn’t given priority and this news got submerged. I feel lucky to do a film like this. Also, it’s not just about hockey. What I want to say through this film is that every girl and boy in our country should pursue one sport. Croatia, which is such a small country, has made it compulsory for every child to play a sport. And maybe because of a culture or compulsion like that, the country made it to the Football World Cup final this year. Sports should be an important aspect in every individual’s life. It can keep you away from drugs and alcohol as your fitness-oriented mind will not allow such bad habits.

  • How different is it working with women directors?

    I’ve never thought about this. Every filmmaker, whether a man or a woman, has his own style and approach towards a film. If four individuals are given one scene to direct, each one will have their own way of directing it. Tanuja (Chandra) and Reema are more realistic in their approach while Farah (Khan) will consider commercial aspects.

  • Was your son, Aarav,always interested in sports or did you instil that passion in him?

    He’s most interested in martial arts and he’s got his black belt. Now he’s concentrating on studies.

  • You started out as an action hero and went on to do comedy and now thematic films. Which phase is closest to your heart?

    The phase I’m in right now. I was always wary of acquiring an image. The action hero tag stuck to me for long. No one offered me a romantic or a comedy film. It was frustrating to wake up every morning, go on the set, perform action scenes and come back home. Koft aagayee thi khudse (I was irritated with myself)! Now, I’m doing Kesari an actioner, Housefull 4 a comedy, and so many social films, where I get to play so many different characters.

  • Which directors have been instrumental in bringing a change in your career?

    I thank Priyadarshan sir for giving me a break (Hera Pheri). I wonder what made him believe I could do comedy. David Dhawan gave me Mr & Mrs Khiladi. Then I did Rajkumar Santoshi's Khakee. That’s how things started moving in other directions for me.

  • Would you be game for a biopic on yourself?

    I’d never make a biopic on myself. I’d be a fool to make one on a reel hero. I want to make biopics on real heroes. Neither will I write a book on myself. There are so many amazing people, whose stories are yet to be told. People who’ve taken India towards a positive direction in their own way. I don’t know where to hide my face when I hear that song, Seedhe saadhe Akshay (Khiladiyon Ka Khiladi). (Cringes) It’s painful to hear your own name even in a song.

  • Talking about songs, film music has lost its enduring quality.Why?

    Youngsters like new-age songs. Punjabi songs have become a rage even though most don’t understand the lyrics. Then there is South Indian music too. On radio, they don’t even play the full song. The audience doesn’t have the patience to listen. Things have changed. If a song works even for a month, great. Even films meet the same fate. Earlier, they would celebrate silver, golden jubilees. But now 50 days is good enough. There’s no breathing space between releases. At times, there are around nine releases per week including English films. Given this scenario, even the audiences expect a variety. that’s why you can never plan or guess what the audience will want in the next few months.

  • You have a release every three-four months. How do you maintain the work-life balance?

    Family comes first. I go on regular holidays with my family. At home, it’s mandatory to have at least one meal ñ either breakfast, lunch or dinner together. My children have to join us on the table and share a conversation or have a discussion on any topic. That bonding gives you the energy to face the world.

  • What is your daily diet plan?

  • What is your advice for staying fit?

  • How important is the Fit India movement according to you?

  • What do you have to say about your movie Housefull 4?

  • Would you call 2019 to be a phenomenal year for you?

  • What is on your bucket list now?

  • Did your past failures demotivate you?